Radiators - Chevy Impala SS Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By 1slow96
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 11:11 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 9
 
Radiators

Whats up everybody!! I hope im putting this in the right place.. My name is Mario from Hayward NorCal Bay Area and proud owner of a 1996 Impala SS and 1964 Impala.. When it comes to radiators stock or high performance engines, especially high performance engines.. If you have an aluminum radiator or high flow radiator 1,2,3,4 row tubes whatever and you're wondering why your engine is still overheating.. Its cuz all that i mentioned is making it worse and overheating your engine even more.. Now aluminum radiators are grounded cuz they're mounted to the radiator support and that creates electrolysis that clogs it all up.. High flow radiators do just that, they flow coolant thru the radiators core/tubes too fast and going back in the engine just as hot as it was coming out meaning not staying in the the radiator long enough to cool down.. The only way and only type of radiator that will cool any engine down is the same exact radiator the car came with from the factory.. Just a LOW FLOW DIMPLED TUBE radiator core.. That will slowly flow coolant thru radiator giving coolant plenty of time to cool down and never overheat.. Plus drilling a hole in your thermostat straight across from that thing that moves around about the same size and never have to bleed your cooling system again
JoonBugz510 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 05:59 AM
Senior Member
 
4DoorSS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Beautiful Chester County, PA
Posts: 7,032
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoonBugz510 View Post
Now aluminum radiators are grounded cuz they're mounted to the radiator support and that creates electrolysis that clogs it all up..

Not sure I agree with much you stated here but will let others respond on what really is the cause of our crud build up and high flow vs time to cool the fluid. A lot of the crud is from the iron block/rust. But in particular, I don't agree with the above part of your quote.

While it is true the rad is installed in the rad support, absolutely NO part of it whether it be a stock rad or All Aluminum touches any metal of the rad support. So there could be no Electrolysis as you described since the radiator is ISOLATED from touching any metal by the upper and lower rubber cushions on each corner. At least that's my thought on how I'm reading that statement.

================================================== =============


'95 Caprice SS conversion - Bonny Buckets - 96 Column, Shifter and Console - 3.73 Gear and Herter tune - Z/28 Cluster - Blazer OH Console - Green/Pink bushings - Chromed Impala Wheels - Eibach Springs and Bilstein Shocks - Corvette Engine Dress - the list goes on and still more to do...it never ends.
4DoorSS is offline  
post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 09:07 AM
Senior Member
 
1slow96's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Dayton , Ohio
Posts: 6,012
 
Garage
Also incorrect regarding "drilled" thermostats eliminating the need to bleed the system. Nothing could be further from the truth regarding the LT1. The increased cooling offered by aftermarket radiators such as BeCool is also due to their increased coolant capacity. The result is the ability to cool more volume in the same amount of time.
smelonas likes this.

Winner 2001 Road Course (prep. class) Detroit,MI
Winner 2006 Drag race (SS class) Indianapolis,IN
quickest event reaction time .017sec. (final-round)
1slow96 is offline  
 
post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 11:43 AM
Senior Member
 
4x4high's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Pleasanton, Ca.
Posts: 1,251
 
Garage
Send a message via Yahoo to 4x4high
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4DoorSS View Post
Not sure I agree with much you stated here but will let others respond on what really is the cause of our crud build up and high flow vs time to cool the fluid. A lot of the crud is from the iron block/rust. But in particular, I don't agree with the above part of your quote.

While it is true the rad is installed in the rad support, absolutely NO part of it whether it be a stock rad or All Aluminum touches any metal of the rad support. So there could be no Electrolysis as you described since the radiator is ISOLATED from touching any metal by the upper and lower rubber cushions on each corner. At least that's my thought on how I'm reading that statement.
As long as there is dissimilar materials in a cooling system you WILL get electrolysis IF the proper amount of antifreeze is not added. Water transfers electricity and then add the dissimilar metals and electrolysis happens if not maintaining the proper mixture of coolant to water. http://freeasestudyguides.com/electrolysis.html

1996 DGGM Impala SS

Last edited by 4x4high; 01-10-2017 at 11:45 AM.
4x4high is offline  
post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 01:16 PM
Senior Member
 
4DoorSS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Beautiful Chester County, PA
Posts: 7,032
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4x4high View Post
As long as there is dissimilar materials in a cooling system you WILL get electrolysis IF the proper amount of antifreeze is not added. Water transfers electricity and then add the dissimilar metals and electrolysis happens if not maintaining the proper mixture of coolant to water. Electrolysis in the Cooling System


I agree with the whole Dissimilar Metals as the cause of this and not the fact that the Aluminum Rad is in contact with the Steel Rad Support. There is no metal to metal contact there and no coolant (fortunately) on the outside of most peoples rads.


While I also think of Electrolysis in this manner, the correct term for what we are talking here is "Galvanic Corrosion" at least based on this article.


Galvanic corrosion


Todays word is.... "Galvanic"...

================================================== =============


'95 Caprice SS conversion - Bonny Buckets - 96 Column, Shifter and Console - 3.73 Gear and Herter tune - Z/28 Cluster - Blazer OH Console - Green/Pink bushings - Chromed Impala Wheels - Eibach Springs and Bilstein Shocks - Corvette Engine Dress - the list goes on and still more to do...it never ends.
4DoorSS is offline  
post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 10:15 PM
Senior Member
 
Fred Kiehl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Largo, FL 33774
Posts: 9,840
 
I did some research on electrolysis in the cooling system, and there is a product called Hyperkuhl (no-rosion.com) that will stop all electrolysis except for a little for solder (all aluminum/steel/iron/brass systems have little, or no solder). It takes 2 pints to treat the system at $13 per pint plus shipping, and it also makes the water wetter for better conductivity. The company suggests using antifreeze with either distilled or reverse osmosis filtered water for the best results. If you are in a non freezing area, you can use just reverse osmosis filtered water, and no antifreeze (mid Florida where I live). They do not recommend straight distilled water, because it is too aggressive.


A larger capacity radiator, if designed correctly, will always cool better than a smaller one. The higher flow rate through it will only make the water temp more even in the system. A similar construction radiator of "more" cores (2 vs. 4) will always cool better. The air going through it will have more surface area to pick up heat, and the water will have more surface area to dissipate heat. If the air flow rate is the same, the "more cores" radiator will pass more heat from the water to the air in a given period of time at the same air flow rate. It will not be twice as much, but it will be substantially more. If your engine is overheating, and you have all good components, your radiator is not sufficient for the heat output of the engine. If the radiator is sufficient for the amount of heat produced by the engine, it is more likely that a hose is collapsed, the fan is not turning at the proper speed, or the pump impeller blades are eroded.

1991 OCC 461 (.030 over 454) BBC, 3.23 posi, flash to pass, drop spindles & springs, custom fender skirts, Impala rims, Recaros, Blazer console, MOMO/wood SW w/QR, custom wood shift knob, Pioneer DEH P77DH
1992 OCC now with 5.7 tbi, DEH P77DH
For a parts list, check http://www.impalassforum.com/vBullet...1#post11691762
Fred Kiehl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Chevy Impala SS Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome