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I found on FB marketplace22s I like that are 5X5 (5X127) I'm just looking for a little assurance that it will fit on my '92 RoadMaster before I try and swap my stock wheels for the 22 he has low profile tires on it looks like it will fit but hard to tell by pics. Anyone put some big wheels on a roadmaster and have any tips?

197089
RoadMaster.jpg

RoadMaster.jpg

22s.jpg
 

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The bolt pattern is correct, however you also need to know the width and offset (or back spacing) and what size tire you want to run.

What is the diameter/size of the tires on the stock rims in the above picture? They look bigger than stock...

You can go 22's (or bigger even) but at stock ~28" diameter, there's very little sidewall left for things like bumps, pot holes, etc. Ride comfort will be reduced (though there's a lot to give on these wagons :)).

If you plan to run all 4 tires/rims the same size, then the front is the main concern. Anything that fits on the front will fit on the back.

I've put 20 x 9 with 0mm offset on my RMW with 255/55/20 tires (31" diameter), but had to do some modifications to make them clear on the front (and it's still not 100% clearance at all possible steering/suspension combinations) as well as a ~1" body lift.

A 20x8 or 8.5" (also with 0 or a bit of + offset) would have been a lot better.

If you're going to daily drive this the recommendations will be different than if it's just a weekend cruiser or whatever. Also, think of the spare and cost of the tires/availability of tires in whatever size you pick. If it's your only car - pick something common that tire stores stock so when you damage the sidewall in a pothole, you're not down for days waiting for an oddball tire size to come in. Similar for winter tires/all season vs summer only.


 

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Discussion Starter #3
The bolt pattern is correct, however you also need to know the width and offset (or back spacing) and what size tire you want to run.

What is the diameter/size of the tires on the stock rims in the above picture? They look bigger than stock...

You can go 22's (or bigger even) but at stock ~28" diameter, there's very little sidewall left for things like bumps, pot holes, etc. Ride comfort will be reduced (though there's a lot to give on these wagons :)).

If you plan to run all 4 tires/rims the same size, then the front is the main concern. Anything that fits on the front will fit on the back.

I've put 20 x 9 with 0mm offset on my RMW with 255/55/20 tires (31" diameter), but had to do some modifications to make them clear on the front (and it's still not 100% clearance at all possible steering/suspension combinations) as well as a ~1" body lift.

A 20x8 or 8.5" (also with 0 or a bit of + offset) would have been a lot better.

If you're going to daily drive this the recommendations will be different than if it's just a weekend cruiser or whatever. Also, think of the spare and cost of the tires/availability of tires in whatever size you pick. If it's your only car - pick something common that tire stores stock so when you damage the sidewall in a pothole, you're not down for days waiting for an oddball tire size to come in. Similar for winter tires/all season vs summer only.


Love those wheels on that wagon, and this is gonna be a summer cruiser. Unfortunately the guy selling them is not to talkative so I have no idea what the offset is. I am giving him my stock wheels plus $250 cash cause I have to do everything on a tight budget
 

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What did the 22's come off of? Given your tight budget, you might be better off to keep what you have (and the $250). If they don't fit, it'll cost you a lot more than $250 to fix.
 

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What did the 22's come off of? Given your tight budget, you might be better off to keep what you have (and the $250). If they don't fit, it'll cost you a lot more than $250 to fix.
In the picture it looks like a 70s truck, I am gonna have them swap the wheels so if they dont fit on I wont buy them. All he knows is the Bolt Pattern which is the correct 5X5
 

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One challenge with checking front wheel/tire clearance is compressing the suspension and turning the steering at the same time.

If you jack up the rear of the car until the rear tires are off the ground, this puts a decent amount of additional weight on the front tires, thus compressing the suspension. Having people sit in the front seats helps too. With a hitch on the car, it's easy to put a jack in the middle of the car at the hitch and raise it up. This can be done with a couple jacks, or jack stands, etc.

With the rear jacked up and front wheels straight, make sure you can run your fingers between the tire and anything on the car. Turn the steering 1/2 turn of the steering wheel and check again, turn to full steering angle (slowly, while watching) and see what (if anything) hits. Same thing the other direction of the steering wheel.

Yes, it's a bit of a hassle

Yes, you want to know now if something is going to hit/rub before a sliced tire, damaged inner/outer fenders, etc
 
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