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This is my daily-driver 96 RMW which I got from Fred in 2006. It is now at 150,000 miles.
Some folks here asked me to post some pictures after the car had spent 3 or 4 long, cold winters in Northern Ontario. So, here they are.
Starts very well in the cold weather, but I always have the block heater plugged in whenever possible. (The RMW is never garaged)
Even though it is 2,93 open differential, the traction is very good with the studded tires.


Some pictures of the inside (November, 2009):









Underside (December, 2009):



















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Discussion Starter #2


Under the hood:














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Looks well maintained underneath. Wish mine looked like that.
 

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Nice one! The underside looks like my 91. I use rust-prevention grease you have to heat up on a stove to spray or brush it. It just looks like that on the pics.
 

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Nice one! The underside looks like my 91. I use rust-prevention grease you have to heat up on a stove to spray or brush it. It just looks like that on the pics.
Looks like the bottom of my 93 as well.

I used excessive blow-by that lead to numerous oil leaks. The replacement motor with more miles doesn't have that problem though. I havent been under the car in a while, I hope the rain hasnt washed it all away...
 

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Ha I promised myself never to fix another leak when I saw the side of the floor of my truck that's had ATF slung against it for 10 years vs the side that didn't.

What's your secret, Northern Classics?
 

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Ha I promised myself never to fix another leak when I saw the side of the floor of my truck that's had ATF slung against it for 10 years vs the side that didn't.

What's your secret, Northern Classics?

Old ATF and a pump sprayer is a good DIY redneck winter salt rust saver. Soak it and park the car on some cardboard..
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
What do you do for rust protection?
What's your secret, Northern Classics?
No secrets, just chemistry! :) Corrosion is a chemical reaction between metals, oxygen and electrolytes, so you only have to prevent the reaction from taking place and your car can last forever.

There are different ways to achieve this. One common way is to seal the metal with primers, paints, waxes, tars, oils, in an attempt to prevent water (electrolyte) from making contact with the metal. This works until the sealing medium cracks and electrolyte gets trapped between the seal and the metal surface, causing significant damage to the metal, which is often hidden, in a short time.

Another method is to use a chemical inhibitor which mixes with water to prevent water from becoming electrolytic. This is the method I use for my cars. The application facility uses a variety of different length wands with several nozzle spray patterns to fog the inside of doors, quarter panels, rockers, tailgate, pillars, frames, and then exterior surfaces: floor pan, suspension components, underhood, window edges, roof rack, around trim etc. The facility has hoists for proper access to the underside of the vehicle. It takes about an hour, costs about 100$, and lasts for one year until the inhibitor wears out and becomes ineffective. Both Krown and Rust Check are very good inhibitors and use the same application methods. I happen to use Rust Check, because the people at the shop I deal with are very thorough with the application, and the product is only as good as it is appplied.

Yet another method uses sacrificial anodes such as magnesium or zinc plates attached to the steel to donate electrons for the reaction instead of the steel. This is seen on boat motor outdrives, and even large ships for hull protection, to supplement electrical cathodic protection systems. Sacrifical anode plates really work best when submerged in the electrolyte with the metal, so unless you store your car at the bottom of a lake, there is little to gain. If it was that easy, we would all have a big block of zinc behind our bumpers and be rust-free for the life of the zinc block!

Note: What the corrosion inhibitor cannot protect against is surface rust caused by breaks in the exterior paint surfaces. So if you live in an area like I do, where they use tons of coarse, abrasive sand on the roads in the winter, then you have to expect to touch up the inside of the wheel wells, rocker panel bottoms etc. as they get sand-blasted from driving. Even the front edge of the hood if you follow other vehicles too close!

The 96 RMW on the hoist at the application facility after inhibitor has been applied to the undercarriage.
There is a lot of inhibitor mist in the air, so the photos are hazy:






These pictures show the inhibitor in the rear floor area.
This would also be applied in a similar fashion to the spare wheel well, dog legs, left rear quarter:




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nice shape

is that Krown or Rust Check???
I've always used Krown , Fall and Spring applications.
Looking good up there in the 'Nord!
 

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Wow, that chemical rust inhibitor stuff works really well! I've heard about that stuff, but I never knew they put in on the sheet metal on the inside of the car too.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
is that Krown or Rust Check???
I've always used Krown , Fall and Spring applications.
Looking good up there in the 'Nord!
I use Rust Check, but both Krown and Rust Check are good products. It would be better to go by which local shop has a better reputation for thorough application of the chemical, than to say Coke is better than Pepsi.

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