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does anyone know if i can connect an ipod adaptor to the aux on a factory 96 cd player?
 

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i tried to do the above methods, and the inside of my radio was different. probly still possible to do, but i think it might have been a ribbon cable i'd have to solder into.

i ran wires from the audio out on my ipod with the radio on to try to test which wires carried the audio signal... don't do what i did... i'm a dumbass and now my ipod doesnt have sound out of the left channel anymore. you could probly use a cheap pair of headphones that you dont care about though to test though

i thought somebody made an adapter kit that just plugs into the aux port on the back, but i dont remember who. i think i remember it being kinda pricey

theres guys on ebay that sell delco radios with the jack already installed too
 

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don't do what i did... i'm a dumbass and now my ipod doesnt have sound out of the left channel anymore.
Same here! except its my iphone !

DOH!

Had to get a replacement headphone jack for it but havent gotten around to putting it in. Hope that will fix it for me.
 

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Same here! except its my iphone !

DOH!

Had to get a replacement headphone jack for it but havent gotten around to putting it in. Hope that will fix it for me.
hahaha it's good to know i'm not the only one that didn't think that through


I used a FM Direct Adapter (Wired FM Modulator Relay) from Sirius Radio company's line up of products. You'll need to run a GM FM Antenna Adaptor Cable (like this: http://www.gosiriusxm.com/GM-FM-Antenna-Adapter-Cable-Kit_p_179.html ) for it to be plug and play.

how's the sound quality with that? any interference?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
any hissing or ground noises w/ the adapter?
 

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None for me, even at low levels. I went in not expecting much, and was suprised with the results.
 

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I do it

There is a guy on the forum here that doses it.. but i forgot his screenname
Yeah I've posted on this mod. The first link is similar to what I do- but I've tapped into the FM pre-amp circuit NOT the CD circuit. Doing it through the FM pre-amp does ensures that you do NOT need to have a CD in the unit. Plus IF your head unit's CD does not work (which is typical after 13 years) you can still have the Ipod work.

No hiss, no searching for FM channels - any and ALL work for the IPOD once plugged into the jack. I mount the jack on the front just below the volume knob.

http://www.impalassforum.com/vBulletin/showthread.php?t=236513


I've got to do another one of the radio's in our fleet so I'll post the pictures within the next month or so.

Dave
Dave
 

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Sorry guys - off season has had me working on the "honey do" job jar ... no car stuff. I will stay tuned... - Dave
 

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Okay here is how I've done it .. proceed at own risk

I'll be posting multiple posts to provide the complete process (have kids and this will take sometime ..so to allow readers the ability to see all the steps in a row, please for now, refrain posting to this thread till I've posted all the steps. Thanx, Dave


1)
Here is my suggestion to add a 1/8" stereo jack that any MP3 player, cell phone, etc can be connected to in order to play music through your STOCK AM/FM/CD head unit.

The radio HAS to work ... CD operation is not required - in fact the CD can be broken and this mod still works. No blank CDs are needed to play via the1/8" jack. When nothing is plugged into the jack the radio operates normally. When the plug is used the volume control of the stock head unit regulates the volume (Set the volume level on the input device (ipod) to about 80%).

Okay first the parts list:

1/8" Stereo jack - closed circuit -RadioShack # 274-246
Wire (I used 4 conductor single strand intercom wire RadioShack # 278-0858
Rosin Core Solder
Solder gun
Shrink Wrap tubing or electrical tape
Heat gun or hair dryer (for shrinking heat shrink tubing)
Glue gun (for mounting jack onto faceplate) - Optional you can use the mounting nut that comes with the jack or glue I've done both and prefer the look of the radio without the ring nut)
Exacto knife
Drill & bits
socket set
torx driver (T-10)
Stock 94-96 AM/FM/CD Head Unit (RADIO)
Tester (optional)
Pigtails to connect to stock radio (optional - I used the first time to ensure I had the right wires and was getting sound out of the radio - but now you gain from my experimentation).
12volt power supply (optional - to power radio - again not needed unless you want to validate this mod as/before you do it)

Attached is the picture of the parts.
 

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Step 2 The wiring plan

Knowing how a stereo plug is wired helps:

Tip of plug is Left channel
next metal band is Right channel
and last large metal band is the ground.

See the attached image of the plug as reference

Knowing how the closed circuit jack is wired in crucial. The reason a closed circuit jack is needed is that when there is no plug in it, it creates a closed circuit (or path) that allows the signal to flow from the PCB FM pre-amp board to the amp section of the radio, allowing normal operation.

Inserting a plug into the jack, interrupts the normal signal (opening the circuit) and "replaces" it with whatever signal your Ipod or device you've plugged in is providing. Unplug an all goes back to normal.

The radio shack part has a wiring diagram on the package the attached photo has my labeling.

In the wiring process, two wires from the FM pre-amp board leading into the amp section of the radio will be cut.

Knowing where each end is wired to on the jack is important. For example if wire 5 is the left channel, when you cut it you'll have two ends, one end going to the FM pre-amp and the other end to the amp section.

For this example, those two wires are considered a "pair" and when connected to the jack they must be wired to be a complete circuit with no plug in the jack - this allows normal radio operation. This may seem complex but it's simple if you keep in mind that what you cut must be reconnected at the jack and to do this you just need to keep the wires ordered.

For our install:

Terminals 3 & 2 of the jack are paired (they connect internally inside the jack to complete the circuit with no plug inserted).

Terminal 4 & 5 of the jack are are paired (they connect internally inside the jack to complete the circuit with no plug inserted).

In these pictures and instructions, I wired terminals 4 & 3 to the ends of the cut wires going to the FM pre-amp board and 5 & 2 wired to the cut wires going to the main amp section of the radio.

In later pictures the FM pre-amp board can be identified as the side that the wires disconnect via a socket and the wires going to main amp section of the radio are identified by the fact that the wires are soldered to the board.
 

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3 - Radio disassmbly ..

Start with the stock AM/FM/CD radio & remove the volume knobs and the tuning knob.

Remove the nut and washer from the volume knob (see attached picture).

Flip the radio over and place it on it's top (CD side on the table) so you can access the bottom cover of the radio.

Remove the four screws that attach the bottom cover to the radio chassis. Three are on the sides and one is a torx head screw near the large finned heat sinks (see attached picture it shows most of them).

Removing the cover exposes the bottom of the FM pre-amp board.
 

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Step 4 remove FM pre-amp board & face plate

With the FM pre-amp board exposed remove the three screws attaching it to the radio chassis (see picture).

Pivot the FM pre-amp board over to the right - heat sink side (like opening a trap door).

Locate the gang of wires connected to the pre-amp board to the main amp circuit board (In my picture they are on the left side).

Carefully remove the wire connector from the socket and place the FM pre-amp board off to the side- you won't need it till re-assembly.

Locate two gangs of wire attached to the main amp circuit board that lead to the front face plate. Carefully unplug these wire gangs from their sockets (green in the picture).

Now you can start removing the face plate by using a flat blade screwdriver to release the face plate tabs from the radio chassis (see picture). I found that if the knobs for base, balance, fade, etc are pushed in the cover slips over them. When removing the face place be careful with the wires as the metal chassis is sharp and can cut the wires (bad).
 

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Step 5 tap into wires and attach wire "patch cable"

Now we'll tap into the FM pre-amp wires leading into the main amp circuit board.


First, Using the 4 conductor wire from Radioshack - cut off a 5 inch or so length to make a "patch cable" and prepare it by stripping the insulation off each wire and then separating the ends so you have room to manipulate them and solder them individually.

Now, locate the gang of wires that went to the FM pre-amp board that you unplugged in the previous step. It has one end soldered onto the main amp circuit board the other end has a connector and there are 15 wires total.

One side of the connector starts with a black wire - go to the opposite side of the connector - now count in from that side, five wires, you've located the Right channel wire. I marked it with red marker to make sure I cut the correct wire (see attached picture).

Cut the wire (See attached picture).

Slip a length of heat shrink tubing on both ends of the cut wires
Solder the red lead from the Radioshack patch cable to the wire leading to the FM pre-amp side connector and solder the green wire to the wire gong to the main amp circuit board (soldered to board)- see attached picture. Slip the heat shrink tubing over the solder joints and using a heat gun or hair dryer shrink tubing to seal the joints.

Now you'll repeat the above process using the two remaining wires in the Radioshack "patch" cable for the left channel.

Go back to the connector again locate the black wire - go to the opposite side of the connector - now count in from that side, four wires, you've located the Left channel wire. I marked it with black marker in one of the attached pictures.

Cut the fourth wire.

Slip a length of heat shrink tubing on both ends of the cut wires
Solder the black lead from the Radioshack patch cable to the wire leading to the FM pre-amp side connector and solder the white wire to the wire gong to the main amp circuit board (soldered to board) Slip the heat shrink tubing over the solder joints and using a heat gun or hair dryer shrink tubing to seal the joints. - see attached picture showing all wires soldered and sealed with heat shrink tubing.
 

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Step six prepare faceplate for jack

This is the part of the mod that is NOT reversible - you're going to drill a hole through the face plate for the jack.

Depending where you place the jack and how particular you are will determine how hard this step is.

On my first conversion I positioned the hole/jack a bit too low in relationship to the tuning knob and when the radio was installed the part of the dash surround that covers the radio was in the way - about an 1/16 of an inch - my son said for his car that would be fine and he'll shave a bit off the dash surround for the plug to fit. For me I said no way and I positioned the jack closer to the tuning knob on my second radio (I think I went too close to the tuning knob!!). Moving it closer to the knob, caused me more modification of the faceplate, as I had to relocate a light bulb and cut a "light spreader" (my term for a clear acrylic piece that spreads the light of a single bulb across the face plate).

I've realized that I have no pictures of my last install of the jack itself and the hot gluing it to the face plate - but I've included internal pics from my son's -which is why on close-ups in the next post of the jack the wires connected to it are all black- but my instructions will be for the 4 color coded RadioShack wires to get you a working radio.


First the PCB board must be separated from the face plate- remove the 7 or so screws (i didn't have the right socket -I think it is 3mm my set only went down to 4mm- so I used a long nose vice-grip wrench) see attached picture of loosened screws.

Separate the PCB board and set aside (See picture).

Locate and remove the "light spreader" so you can test fit the position of the jack. I shortened my "light spreader" to make room for the jack (see picture comparing the lengths). Continue to modify the faceplate to position the jack- I used an Exacto knife to remove a small plastic ridge to allow the jack to lay flat on the face plate. When test fitting the jack remember to test fit the PCB board that lays on top of the jack for clearance - it will bulge a bit but that's okay AND ensure you have enough space for the wires.

Once satisfied that the jack will fit, and the hole's position when drilled will not interfere with any front controls - Drill the hole.

The pictures attached show a hole and a red dot. The red dot is the spot I used on my son's radio which did not require any lamp moving (no PCB modification).

If you need to move the lamp it requires un-soldering the lamp from the PCB board, extending the lamps leads with wire, re-soldering, repositioning, test fitting etc. hey you're modding here !!!

Design idea: I believe it could be possible to make a patch cable routed to a remote location under the dash or to the console. It would require a shielded 4 conductor cable w/shield (ground) to keep the cable from acting as an antenna and causing cross-talk. I couldn't find that cable locally, nor an inline jack that was normally closed - plus I decided not to to go that route - but you might want to for a mod that could be completely reversible.
 

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