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1995 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham
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Discussion Starter · #141 ·
When you get there you will find it easy.

There are gasket kits like this one available. Some have the foam for the TB sensor.
GP Sorensen Fuel Injector Throttlebody Gasket 96-3008
Good to know.

I may go buy some oven cleaner for the underside of this intake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #142 ·
I just had to say:

The flat black Rustoleum "High Heat" stuff that is intended for painting BBQ grills is turning into my new best friend. It makes a great all-purpose paint in situations where heat is a concern. I used it on the steam pipe, for example. It works, it dries fast, it's cheap, and you can buy it anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #144 ·
I have a memory that there are different formulations and one will eat aluminum.
The one that was recommended to me by a friend was Easy-Off. I honestly don't know how safe it is on aluminum, but anecdotally I know he has used it on aluminum engines and hasn't noticed any issues.

In my case, I am ceramic coating the intake after cleaning, so I will not necessarily care about the finish the same way that others may. If this cleaner causes any issues, I will surely document them here.
 

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This bears repeating , while it is important to remove the large lower pipe plugs when ever the intake is being cleaned, any coating being done it is ABSOLUTELY mandatory.
One guy here blamed his engine failure on poor assembly of his long block on his builder.
To this day, I think the owner bolted his shiny ceramic intake on full of glass beads and ceramic powder.
Personaly I pulled the plugs on one the guy I was building for after he got it back ported and powder coated by one of the recognized top head shops .
Full of media blast medium .
 

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Discussion Starter · #146 ·
This bears repeating , while it is important to remove the large lower pipe plugs when ever the intake is being cleaned, any coating being done it is ABSOLUTELY mandatory.
One guy here blamed his engine failure on poor assembly of his long block on his builder.
To this day, I think the owner bolted his shiny ceramic intake on full of glass beads and ceramic powder.
Personaly I pulled the plugs on one the guy I was building for after he got it back ported and powder coated by one of the recognized top head shops .
Full of media blast medium .
I appreciate the info, but this might not apply in my case.

I will be using the DIY product from Mastercoat that will be painted onto the exterior with a small foam brush. No sand blasting or ceramic on the inside. I am interested in using this stuff on headers in the future, so I decided to test it out on an intake first.
 

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I just assumed as this is in Mastercoat(R) literature

Surface MUST be sandblasted and oils bled from the substrate before applying this coating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #148 ·
I just assumed as this is in Mastercoat(R) literature

Surface MUST be sandblasted and oils bled from the substrate before applying this coating.
When they say MUST, they mean in order to validate warranty claims. Not in order for the stuff to "work".
On the bottle, it says the surface must be degreased with a torch. I'm using oven cleaner that appears to be eating the aluminum. To put it simply, I'm just not taking it that seriously.

For all I know, this engine is going to throw a rod 3 weeks after I register the car. This isn't a frame-off resto or a show car... Needless to say, I'm skipping a lot of steps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #149 ·
After the oven cleaner, wire brushing, and brake cleaner... I decided to go over the surface with my propane torch.

The underside of the manifold got about 75% clean before I ran out of patience. As I said, this just ain't that kinda car.

The ceramic stuff needs to cure for 48 hours, then the bottle says to buff with steel wool and polish with metal polish. I did booger the ceramic in a couple of places by trying to apply to spots that had already started drying. I am hoping I will be able to smooth these imperfections after curing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #150 ·
Oh, damn you! :grin2:


From what I have gathered, the "locker" style differentials such as the Truetrac are far superior than the clutch style as far as durability. In theory, they should pretty much last forever. The issue is that the clutch style differentials are king when it comes to road racing. If you like to take corners at speed, you probably don't want an "on/off" type of differential.
I just wanted to correct myself for anybody who may happen to read this...

The True-trac is NOT a "locker" style diff. The Detroit True-trac uses worm gears, and the Detroit Locker is, surprisingly, an actual locker. I got them mixed up.

The True-trac is perfectly suitable for road racing, and some may even prefer it to a clutch-style diff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #151 · (Edited)
Okay, this intake manifold looks like a fail and a massive waste of time. I guess I chalk it up as learning experience.

The punchline is that this ceramic stuff didn't adhere to the manifold entirely. There are some areas that look really nice, but there are other areas where the ceramic buffed right off like it was powder just sitting on the surface. I certainly don't blame the product, as there are obvious user error issues.

First of all, I should have taken 95wagon's warning about prep more seriously. I just didn't really know what to expect from this product, and I expected it to be a bit more paint-like. It is nothing like paint, and is definitely more like ceramic powder suspended in water. Sandblasting is likely very important, but I think the bit about bleeding all oils from the substrate using heat is the real issue. The porosity of metal never ceases to amaze, am I right?

Second, the temp just happened to randomly drop below freezing the night that I applied the product. It's possible that the cold temps messed up the curing process.

Third and finally, I had an issue with the consistency of the product, but one that is likely my own fault. I bought the bottle probably a year or so ago, and it had been sitting on a closet shelf ever since. I shook the living **** out of the bottle before use. I started to apply the product, and was concerned at how thin the product seemed to be. It was a watery clear liquid that didn't seem to be covering at all. At some point, I realized that the bottom of the bottle seemed heavier than the top, so I had the idea to stick a screwdriver in the bottle. I immediately realized I screwed up (no pun intended) badly. At the bottom of the bottle was a solid mass of ceramic goo. It had completely separated from the water it should have been suspended in. I added a bit of tap water and then stirred the ceramic vigorously with the screwdriver. Eventually, I got the consistency to where it should be, but the damage had already been done. I had already applied a bunch of watery crap that was beginning to dry. So, I applied the rest of the bottle and hoped for the best.

Some areas were too thin, some too thick, and some areas were bare after the ceramic buffed right off. I'm a bit frustrated with the amount of time I spent on this. But, with that said, this intake manifold was supposed to be a practice run. I didn't want to try coating a set of headers until I had some experience with the product. So, in that sense, I succeeded. At this point I think I will just sand the manifold, spray it with aluminum-colored high heat paint, and pretend none of this ever happened. The cruel irony is that after all of this buffing and sanding, the manifold is going to need to be deep-cleaned even further, just to ensure there is no ceramic dust or debri inside the intake.

I have some mixed feelings about this product, although I should be clear that the quality of the product is not in question. This is one of the only legit DIY ceramic products on the market, and it certainly has its place. My issue is that there is apparently a pretty extreme amount of prep involved, and this prep is required. Most people don't own a media blaster, and most people don't have the capability to degrease using heat. A propane torch is not sufficient.

Considering the amount of labor required to get a decent result, I'm not sure that I would buy this product again. I was excited at the idea of being able to do my own ceramic coating, but I can't spend an entire work week trying to make my intake manifold shinier. I feel like I would be better off paying a shop $300 to do a set of headers, getting a warranty, and spending my time doing something more productive.

Also worth mentioning is the fact that uncoated headers are always going to have some sort of paint on them to keep them from rusting before install. I can't even imagine trying to strip the paint and degrease a set of long tubes down to raw metal, before even beginning the process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #152 ·
I have one exhaust manifold stud snapped off in each head. I think only one of them matters, as the one on the passenger side is the very front most stud, the one that is not used by headers.

The one on the driver's side has turned into an issue. One of the tricks I saw on the glorious internet was to drill a hole in the center of the stud and then hammer a torx bit into the hole. This sounded like fun, but I botched the operation by using a random cheap torx bit from my box of "junk" bits. I'm not sure why that seemed like a good idea. I was afraid to damage a nicer bit, but the reality is that you shouldn't even attempt something like this unless you are using a super-hardened bit that you know for sure isn't going to do what mine did.

Mine obviously snapped right off as soon as I tried to turn it, leaving me with a really cool star shape in the middle of this stud. The issue now is that I can't seem to drill this piece of torx bit with any drill bit that I own. I'm not sure what kind of drill bit would be required.

Several of you guys have cautioned me against disturbing the factory head gaskets, but I'm starting to get anxious about my ability to extract this stud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #154 ·
If I don't have a welder 5 years from now, I'm going to kill myself. I constantly need one, yet convince myself I need the money for other things.

I have a friend who welds, and a few weeks ago I gave him a rear sway bar for his birthday. I might be able to ask for a well-timed favor.
 

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I have one exhaust manifold stud snapped off in each head. I think only one of them matters, as the one on the passenger side is the very front most stud, the one that is not used by headers.

The one on the driver's side has turned into an issue. One of the tricks I saw on the glorious internet was to drill a hole in the center of the stud and then hammer a torx bit into the hole. This sounded like fun, but I botched the operation by using a random cheap torx bit from my box of "junk" bits. I'm not sure why that seemed like a good idea. I was afraid to damage a nicer bit, but the reality is that you shouldn't even attempt something like this unless you are using a super-hardened bit that you know for sure isn't going to do what mine did.

Mine obviously snapped right off as soon as I tried to turn it, leaving me with a really cool star shape in the middle of this stud. The issue now is that I can't seem to drill this piece of torx bit with any drill bit that I own. I'm not sure what kind of drill bit would be required.

Several of you guys have cautioned me against disturbing the factory head gaskets, but I'm starting to get anxious about my ability to extract this stud.

I also have that same exhaust bolt broke off on the drivers side. I know it is easily extracted if you have the tools to do so-------BUT when i put my headers on over 10 years ago--taken them off at least 5 times, with out geting the broken bolt out-----my headers have NEVER leaked. But if I was in your shoes I would get it out.
 
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....................And I had forgotten all about the O-rings in addition to the umbrellas. Old Zimers.
The Fel-Pros were recommended to me by other members, and they are dirt cheap on Rock Auto. I'm super happy with them. It was my first time doing stem seals, and they damn near put themselves in. ........
It turns out a classic case of 'You can't remember what didn't happen." I didn't recall the little o-ring seals because the Canfield heads have no second groove. And you're right. The reason I don't remember much about installing the seals at all is because they quote, "damn near put themselves in. ........" :cool:
 
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Discussion Starter · #157 ·
Still kinda stuck on this broken stud. Hopefully not for long. I picked up an extractor kit from Home Depot. I'm going to try drilling again, but with proper stuff.

I had a couple of minor personal scores at the junkyard today. I got a cool trunk battery box from a 2013 PPV. Also found a factory 10" sub box from a Cobalt that is exactly what I've been looking for. I have been planning to stick a single small sub in the side of the trunk, and this will work perfectly. I will have to figure out an appropriate sub/amp combo to go with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #158 ·
I still haven't made an attempt at the broken stud. I've just been spending my energy on other stuff lately. I will get back in Fleetwood mode soon.

My friend gave me a gift today... Some brand new center caps that are blank. I know someone who can make decals, so I am trying to decide on something "custom". Considering CADDY in all caps.

I've been looking into some aero and brake cooling stuff for my red 94, which will eventually be a full-blown race car.
 

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Before you attempt the bolt extraction, spray with a good penetrating oil off and on for a few days. I’ve extracted lots of bolts before with no problems by doing that but I recently broke a few old timing cover bolts and on the last extraction ( being in a rush) I broke the easy out inside! So now a $40 job just got really expensive.HTH
 
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