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Discussion Starter #1
I have run into several very bad remote starter installs in a row. Bad enough to make me want to take pictures and post.


First I recommend heat shrink(double wall outside the cabin area), or self vulcanizing patching tape, or high temperature electrical tape with something to stop it from unwinding.


These pictures are the main high current wires of a ignition switch circuit, I saw worse work in the engine compartment and took the time to check this area. As luck had it there was no fire, burnt wiring, or burnt out fuseible links. Just bare wires about to touch each other. Despite this wire group being taped together the electrical tape had started to come off.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
No surprise the door remote was malfunctioning and no remote trunk opening. So I followed the door trigger wires to the door "boot". But the wires were not in the door? What I found was that the lock wires were patched inside the door "boot". The worst place to do it as these wires move with every opening of the driver's door. Worse because the solder adds two more flex points without any protection to them.


When exposed one patch was only connected by two wire strands that had flexed and broken off. Both were cold soldered, with flux left on the joint. The OEM wires had several strands cut. A proper fix involves patching in new wire between the door and kick panel.
 

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I've yet to see a good application for electrical tape - can't stand the stuff - always makes a sticky, gooey mess, unwraps, etc.

I know I'll get some flack for this, but solder is for components that don't move (resistors or diodes on a circuit board for example). Crimps are for things that do move (wires).

Good job on identifying the problems, fixing it right and sharing with others!
 

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To make a good solder joint you must have good mechanical contact between the wires. This is where the power flows. Tight smooth connections will also reduce the risk of your insulating cover wearing off. Solder should be used to hold wires together not be a blob encasing the wires.

When enough heat is applied to a solder joint the result will be a shiny solder connection not the dull lead look of a cold solder. Any flux left over should at least be brushed off and or washed off.


From a different remote starter here are some cold solder joints. If measured these joints would show a voltage drop.
 

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Crimps are for things that do move (wires).

Any joining of wires should be secured, solder or crimped or you just made a new fail point.


You have made a point for another thread. Aircraft and ground vehicles are manufactured with crimped connections for the most part. They are done in very well controlled conditions. Carefully done crimps should be fine. If your crimp tool is also a wire stripper you are doing things the hard way and the result may not be good. The ratchet crimpers with different dies for different crimps work so much better and are easier to use. Rule of thumb is most 22-16 ga crimps should take a 25-50 LB pull. The wire should break without coming out of a crimp. If it is not mechanically solid it is a fail.
 

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Thanks for posting this. Car fires are almost always instant totals so this is very important. I would add that good heat shrink tubing is also easy and well worth it.
 
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