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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would it be worth it & beneficial to install a shift kit in a stock wagon used as a daily driver & for towing?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Originally posted by MrBuick (Magnum):
because... the less amount of slipage you have, the less it wears the clutch packs... right?
Yep. The other thing is that replacing the boost valve and cleaning the EPC filter screen are what I consider to be key line-pressure-related maintenance items that otherwise would never get done.

You could go comparing - but it's not like anyone has 9 4L60Es and they've tried all the kits. Go with a recommendation from someone you trust.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Originally posted by sherlock9c1:
You could go comparing - but it's not like anyone has 9 4L60Es and they've tried all the kits. Go with a recommendation from someone you trust.
Definitely...I haven't checked yet, but I just thought I heard a couple different kits mentioned around here...no?

How difficult is it to install a kit on the driveway? I figured I'd do it while I did the fluid/filter change. The kits don't come with a main filter & seal, do they???...'cause I already bought an AC Delco filter & seal.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For all the "DIY in the driveway" guys, when you remove the valves (or some call them pistons), make sure you mark their orientation as to which end goes back in first. Most will slip in either way, but only one way works, the other way is trouble... very expensive trouble. If you drop it and don't know which end is which, you are screwed.

Mark them
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Never never do a shift kit just because you need to do a fluid/filter change (boost valve yes, shift kit no). They are orders of magnitude differences between the jobs - like saying I'm going to put a cam in because I've got an oil change coming up.

You can do a shift kit in the driveway (I did once), but beware of contamination via wind blowing things under the car and sticking to the underside of the exposed transmission. As soon as you get the valvebody off, put the pan back on (just a few bolts is fine).

Plan on a full weekend if you've never done it before.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Originally posted by sherlock9c1:
Never never do a shift kit just because you need to do a fluid/filter change (boost valve yes, shift kit no). They are orders of magnitude differences between the jobs - like saying I'm going to put a cam in because I've got an oil change coming up.

You can do a shift kit in the driveway (I did once), but beware of contamination via wind blowing things under the car and sticking to the underside of the exposed transmission. As soon as you get the valvebody off, put the pan back on (just a few bolts is fine).

Plan on a full weekend if you've never done it before.
Right, I understand it's a much more involved job....but the pan is already off. Thanx for the pointers.

Not to sound like a total noob, but what's a boost valve? Is this an upgrade? Something worth doing for a stock daily driver/tow vehicle '95 RM wagon?
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Originally posted by lakeffect:
For all the "DIY in the driveway" guys, when you remove the valves (or some call them pistons), make sure you mark their orientation as to which end goes back in first. Most will slip in either way, but only one way works, the other way is trouble... very expensive trouble. If you drop it and don't know which end is which, you are screwed.

Mark them
I appreciate that...yeah, when I was doing a shift kit on my 1st car, while I had the trans out, I made that very mistake.

It's been over 20 yrs tho...is the valve body encased when you pull it out or will it be a balancing act trying to pull it out on the driveway? How difficult will it be to pull it out w/o spilling valves, etc, everywhere before I can mark them?
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The way tranny works from the factory ,(with a goal of performing seamless shifts) is:
when is is time to upshift, say from 1st to 2d, the clutches of both gears start slipping, (while both set of gears are engaged)gradually releasing the 1st set of gears and grabbing more on the 2ds. Buy the time 2d is fully engaged, the 1st is fully released.
By altering the diameter of key passages in the sererator plate that is squeesed between valve body and tarns.case , + removing springs from 1-2 and 3-4 accumulators this prosess is shortened
As a result, the shifts are not seamless anymore. You feel a kick when tranny upshifts. (It's like a power shift on a manual tranny).The more you lean on the pedal the more pornounced the kick is. Give it 3/4 throttle from the start, and the kick results in tire spin and squeal when shifting from 1 to 2d. Car goes sideways for a split second.
If applying throttle moderatly, is it pretty civil.
The benefits are:
1)fast shifts improve ETs,
2)there is less heat generated from slipping clutches, (and heat kills the trannys!)- longer tranny life,
3)better gas milege.
The down side is for those with a heavy foot - rear end, universal joins and tires wear.
So, like any mod out there, if used proprly it is great to install a shift kit to have a sporty feel, prolong life of the tranny, it is also great for towing.
B&M kit is great, I installed it on 4 of my cars, no need to dig deep into your valve body, a weeked job easy.
BUT. Cleaningness is next to Godinness, have a manual handy, go by the book,good luck, it is worth the effort, man.

[ 06-12-2007, 04:36 AM: Message edited by: hellbrand ]
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, that was about half right. But I totally agree on the part about harsh shifts shocking the driveline. Not all shiftkits do that (the transGo HD2C kit doesn't if you install it as-instructed). As I said in a thread over in the drivetrain section, overly harsh part-throttle shifts is like kicking your dog for no reason - it's dumb and it needlessly causes harm.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Originally posted by sherlock9c1:
Well, that was about half right. But I totally agree on the part about harsh shifts shocking the driveline. Not all shiftkits do that (the transGo HD2C kit doesn't if you install it as-instructed). As I said in a thread over in the drivetrain section, overly harsh part-throttle shifts is like kicking your dog for no reason - it's dumb and it needlessly causes harm.
Just curious, which half are you familiar with and which are not? ;)
The three benefits (performance, longevity, gas milege) are common knowlege.
As far as how shift kits work, I tried three different kinds the B&M was simplest and works great - I bought my 95 wagon with 148K on it.Put on 90K since, 80K with a shift kit. Still no trouble.
Now some folks will tell you to dig deep into the valve body and what not. Alter the regulator to increase it line pressure. Some like to reprogramm.
I've learned, all that is not nesessary for street use.
Exellent results can be gained by a very simple mod - three holes were enlarged in the separator plate, one hole was blocked, springs removed from accumulators-aluminum tubes slide over the actuator's pins instead, a spring changed in the pressure reg. valve. B&M kit cost $45.
They offer two different levels of trim too, just depends on enlargement of the holes and length of the alum. tubes.
What I did next was cut my own tubes, drilled my own holes in the separator plate, and even without changing pressure reg. valve's spring, got the next car to shift nicely.
You can play and fine tune the harshness of them shifts,by altering the length of the tubes and size of holes. At least for me it works great.
On the shifting while driving, it only takes a day or less to get used to it. Instead of keeping the gas pedal steady throughout shifts, when you feel it's time to upshift, just lift the pedal and tranny slips into next gear, no spin no harm .
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The 4L60E doesn't use "1st clutch, 2nd clutch" although there are other transmissions that do. forward gear choice is determined by the 2-4 band and the 3-4 clutchpack.

I have seen the B&M kit and I'm not a big fan of it. I'm not trying to argue, but just sticking to my point that there is absolutely no reason for needlessly harsh part-throttle shifts.

This thread really should be in the drivetrain section. For more good reading, go see the top of the drivetrain section.
 
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