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Hello everyone. I've been way for a while. I posted a while back asking for answers to repair techniques or ways to restore my dash pad. I mentioned flocking it. Long story short, I did some research and found a product made my Polyvance. It's a plastic welding iron (oversized soldering iron with a small flat triangle clothes iron shaped presser melter at a slight angle if you will at the end of the iron (plastic welder). They sell a product called fiber flex. Fiber flex is the welding rod and resembles vehicle tire plug patches but longer and slimmer. Their method is to grind a valley through the crack with a die grinder and abrasive disc. I used a die grinder ( the one where the collet /spindle is linear to the grinder and the ON/SPIN lever with a 1 inch or so by 1 inch or so wide flap wheel. Packs of flap wheels are available on Amazon. My technique consisted of flapping the valley with the pneumatic grinder at a 45 degree angle about an inch wide or until the crack is flat meaning no raised up sun damage. Smaller cracks that caN be ground narrower meaning enough to comfortably fill the valley confidently (you be the judge). You will get good at it so no worries. Backing up a little bit, I chose to experiment with white/clear Gorilla glue substituting the Polyvance I'm always seeking budget friendly repairs. The welder is a little pricey for my pocket book so I decided to use gorilla glue. I decided to experiment Gorilla glue because it dries porous and in my eyes is very strong, sticky, flexible. Polyvance also sells the dash pad filler which is a flexible filler that smells and sand paper sands similar to body filler. I used a Black And Decker Mouse sander with 80 grit. 36 would knock it down faster. You may see my point. Note: Be careful applying pressure especially using heavy pneumatic sanders or hand sanding if you are not patient because I applied too much pressure no created some new hr line cracks as my dash pad is very brittle. Patients is the friend.
On with more technique: When grinding the valley/s, clearing the cracks, I found removing too much foam appeared soft mushy foam which resembled crumb doughnut texture (starts to fall apart which you do not want). I do not know if my dash has its own flaws in manufacturing or is it common on these Caprice/Impala dashes but it's not too much to worry about. My opinion is it's better maybe to stop removing foam with the flap wheel when or if you see the foam crumbling and losing its porous integrity. I found the dash frame or platform is made of ABS Plastic of some sort and maybe (now that I'm thinking about it) grinding down to the ABS May or not be a problem) I do not recommend it though as the crumbling foam pulls way from under the shoulders of the vinyl creating difficulty for the Gorilla glue to fill all space meaning no empty pockets underneith the surface synthetic vinyl. Also, after grinding the valley, its important to feather the vinyl at the shoulder of the valley-meaning the vinyl's edge. On my grey dash pad, feathering the edge of the crack reveals a dark brown color which is either the color of the synthetic vinyl or a first layer of the synthetic vinyl foam covering. This is all just my opinion. The feathering creates a surface for the Polyvance filler to *adhere. More technique: Before applying the Gorilla glue, I (as Gorilla glue says in their directions a small bit of water by dipping my index finger in a cup of water and if you will paint by pulling the water through and over all the foam revealed in the ground valley created by the grinder. The water is said to make the gorilla glue stick better if I'm correct. It's on the directions. More technique: After applying a conservative amount of water, The Gorilla glue was applied to the valley starting in the deepest point of the valley in long back and forth low motion carefully squeezing the glue bottle and careful hand motion as well helping to avoid any air pockets in the string of glue applied. After applying the glue, keeping watch , the Gorilla glue will swell up like construction foam. Gorilla glue dries pretty quick if you are patient. Can be pressed on within a half an hour if I remember correctly. This may be is a technique as well- pressing the gorilla glue results a more dense repair. I've also during this project/experiment let the gorilla swell (1/2 inch roughly) then using a razor blade against the dash, trim Ellen foam off. After this, I used a cordless drill with the same flap wheel to knock down the glue some more-enough to apply the filler-then sand flat. Note: I realily spent some time doing this, and it gets easier as you do it. It's not a one or two day project unless you do it every day. Final note: after applying the glue, pressing the glue, trimming the glue with a regular construction refill blade (the triangle shaped one that has the flat on the top) and sanding with the cordless drill and flap wheel, I carefully applied another light string pass of gorilla glue where the brown shoulder of vinyl reveal meets the Gorilla glue as to create bridge adhesion Preparing a strong urbane to apply filler. Anyway. I hope this is a decent explanation of how I am repaIring my dash pad. It's not totally finished but I'm very satisfied with the results so far. This is not a guarantee on any time my repair will last in summer heats, cold winters or any application of cleaners or dash oils. I'm here showing my repair and sharing how I applied some ideas and little searching the internet and forum. Thank you to all of you for replying to my previous questions about ideas on restoring my dash. And thank you to all the guys posting about SEM products and the techniques you all used. I used the same stuff. I used the soap, vinyl prep in a spray can and the SEM medium Grey 15393. Last note. As for the vinyl texture finish that resembles leather, the areas I filled are smooth and I have not experimented with recreating the texture. The only trick I can recommend at this point is to mask and fill as close to the crack as posssible which will protect the vinyl texture from being filled away. Im very happy with my results and feel like if some smooth finishes are here and there, it's just another mod. Feel free to ask questions and I will try to do the best I can to clarify those questions.
 

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Splendid write-up, and quite successful results! Your results show effectiveness with even extensive cracking.
 
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Now the real test...the test of time. Let us know how long this repair lasts.
 
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Thorough work, very nice results, and fingers crossed for long life. I'm probably being Captain Obvious here, but if you don't have a folding sunshade get one to protect your work. I use mine every time I park and it works.
 
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Nice work on the dash, I wouldn't worry about the smooth spots, looks way better than a cracked pad. There was a carpet dash pad on my wagon when I bought it, and though I'm not a big fan about the way it looks, my dash looks brand new.
 
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