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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trying to remove timing cover and can't get the crank snout off!
The harmonic balancer came off fine - but I striped the center rod of the puller I rented and the snout didn't budge.

I've removed the center bolt and I had to get longer 7/16 bolts to mate up the puller to the snout as the ones in the kit were too short (haynes manual also suggested that). I've threaded a headless bolt into the center of the snout as a contact point for the center rod of the puller.

Any thoughts?

Thanks - Dave
 

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I forget if the bolt in the center is supposed to be threaded in or not when pulling. If its not moving, it might just be pulling against itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Nice write-up

Thanks that write w/ pics is nice.- I thought that's what I had done by cutting the head of the bolt of - but it still had the threads on - so will try again with a new bolt - head left on and threads ground down. - Thanks.

Thanks that worked
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Getting snout back on ...

so what's the best way to get the snout (part that the damper mounts to) back on the crank?
 

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I probably do it wrong somehow, but i always just use a lil longer bolt to get it started on, then just use the connecting bolt to pull it the rest of the way onto the crank. I also run a couple of the outer balancer bolts into the hub so a large screwdriver can be used to help hold the crank still.
 

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so what's the best way to get the snout (part that the damper mounts to) back on the crank?
It has to be pressed back onto the crank with a hub installer. When doing this, you will thread into the center bolt hole and press the hub back onto the crank.
 

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Originally from Gerry (95Wagon):

As for install get yourself a piece of quality-threaded rod. Turn it fully into the crank then put a plate across the front of the hub. Next a stack of greased washers (I use an actual bearing) followed by a nut. By doing it this way the threads in the crank are not in a position to be damaged because all the winding-cranking is going on between the nut and threaded rod.
The threaded rod should be 7/16 -20.

Works like a charm and inexpensive.


 

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I'll second (third?) the procedure that Erik quoted from Gerry. It's exactly what I use. Just a few bucks worth of hardware. My setup is slightly different in that I use a 1/2" drive socket along with the stack of greased washers. Easy as pie.
 

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I don't know why, but Gerry's post that was quoted does NOT show up in this thread for me, so I cant see it. My harmonic balancer puller kit came with an installer as well, so I didn;t need to fabricate one. But it is essentially what Gerry described (as quoted by Erik). It is basically a threaded rod to go into the center hole of the crank, with a large thick flat washer to go over the hub opening, and a bearing between the washer and nut to reduce friction when pressing it on via turning the nut with a wrench.

The threaded rod should work fine as long as you can reduce the friction between the washer over the hub opening and the nut.
 

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I don't know why, but Gerry's post that was quoted does NOT show up in this thread for me, so I cant see it.
That's because I didn't quote a post. I put quote tags around text I had saved from several years back. It's the real deal, though. I'm just giving appropriate credit for the technique (which I've used several times to great effect).
 

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That's because I didn't quote a post. I put quote tags around text I had saved from several years back. It's the real deal, though. I'm just giving appropriate credit for the technique (which I've used several times to great effect).
OK, now I feel better. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That did the trick- thanks!
 
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