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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I looked around for a thread discussing out-of-the-box repair parts that were bad and didn't find one, so I'm starting one. If you know of one, post a link and I'll merge it with this. Here's a new one for me: This particular SKP harmonic damper 594017, listed for B-bodies and F-bodies, purchased mid 2019, was drilled backwards at the factory. The LT1 damper is different from the Gen1 small block Chevy in that the damper and hub are separate. The bolts are not uniformly spaced so the damper only goes on one way. In this case, the fat lip side was inboard and the pulley ribs weren't lining up. The only way I could get the pulleys to line up was to flip the damper 180 degrees, but then I couldn't bolt the damper to the hub.

Pictured are two SKP 594017 dampers. The incorrectly drilled one is on the left. The one on the right was bought in early 2020 and is correctly drilled. It becomes obvious once you look at the bolt offsets, but I had tossed the original damper since the rubber was shot after 24 years / 170k miles so I had no reference until I bought the second one (for another LT1). One last note - resist the urge to open up the center to make assembly/removal easier. The damper MUST be very tight on the hub in order to properly dampen crankshaft harmonics.
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Discussion Starter #2
Next discussion should be about the 2018-2020 Delphi replacement sending units with a new design that have a rubber hose between the pump and bulkhead instead of the original corrugated plastic hose. The rubber hose lasts about 300 miles and splits. You can replace that hose with a Goodies Speed 75114, available from Amazon.
 

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Not a b body review but worth mentioning. The last Standard Motor Poroducts multifunction switches I bought were for a crown vic. My 83 year old mother broke her SMP, then I broke my SMP. These cars get maybe 3000 miles a year. Her's was from the "economy line" mine I paid nearly double. When I took them apart I could not see any difference between them. Both had plastic parts break, and I believe it was a production molding problem(injection speed or cooling). Hard to recommend SMP when the two I installed break in under one year with little use. She got a new ford one, and I rebuilt her old ford one (internal cleaning and new dielectric grease) which is now 16 years old and still working in my car.
 

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Next discussion should be about the 2018-2020 Delphi replacement sending units with a new design that have a rubber hose between the pump and bulkhead instead of the original corrugated plastic hose. The rubber hose lasts about 300 miles and splits. You can replace that hose with a Goodies Speed 75114, available from Amazon.
Having LOTS of experience with these I can say it will fail long before that 300 miles.

My first one blew off under 100 miles. It exploded 20 miles later. Next one split open in 50 or so.

The hose isn’t rated for fuel submersion and quickly swells and begins to break down.

Still, even after installing the proper hose on mine the sending unit itself is a piece of junk.
 

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Not a b body review but worth mentioning. The last Standard Motor Poroducts multifunction switches I bought were for a crown vic. ....
Same with GM apparently. I treated my Cady driver to a new opti harness after rebuilding the opti. The clip 'exploded' clean off when first putting it on. No crack, no 'one side broke', just popped clean off. I ended up doing the old '2 miniature tie-wraps capture' method, but clearly the plastic was too rigid in that production run as it sounds is the common case.
 

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I had a post or added to one many years ago. The Moog inner tierods i received had only the outer body drilled for the grease fitting but not the inner 'race'? or the holes weren't aligned if done in two steps. Rockauto exchanged the set but the replacements had the same issue. Basically the grease fitting went into a blind hole.
 

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I couldn't deal with the quality of aftermarket replacement parts anymore, I sold my 94 impala daily driver back in 2012 and began leasing Silverados. I know it's not cost effective, but saves me a whole lot of aggravation in never having to work on it/maintain it beyond oil changes. Turn it in before anything gives me a headache.

I couldn't deal with having to replace defective parts two or three times, stuff that would last 100k miles from the factory would only last 5k after you replaced it. Doing the same job over and over again. Water pumps, optisparks, all the brands that were supposedly the reliable ones all ended up becoming outsourced garbage. I once had to swap water pumps 3 times in a row when the first two leaked out of the weep hole upon startup,

My 96 project is painful because just about every mechanical aspect of the car has now been replaced with some aftermarket performance part (entire brake system, fuel system, engine, trans, rear etc...).
I didn't want to do all of this and leave a 120k mile AC condenser or heater core or evaporator core to take a dump on me 6 months after getting the car all back together and driving so I just went ahead and replaced everything. Haven't fired the car up yet, but one of my worries is that I replaced some 120k mile part that still worked with something that's not going to work. It's sad when the only parts you could have faith in are NOS parts from the 90's lol
 
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Discussion Starter #10
SSandman, I saved my original AC compressor for that exact reason. They are easy to rebuild and rebuild kits are cheap on Ebay.
I actually just finished rebuilding the CS144 140-amp alternators for both of my cars and once you figure out how to get the bearings in and out, they were dog easy as well. In fact, you can replace the regulator, capacitor, diodes (rectifier) and brushes just by pulling the back off. If the bearings would last longer, you wouldn't even need to mess with the front part at all.
 

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@sherlock9c1 , do you have a link for a compressor rebuild kit? I saved my factory original compressor when it failed in the hope of rebuilding it someday. Maybe I wasn't looking in the right places, but I couldn't find a kit or a rebuilder when I looked a few months ago.
 

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I second these:

Aforementioned Delphi fuel pump with the black hose from my buddy's car...
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Dorman oil cooler line mounting tab on backwards...

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And I'll raise you these. Get AC Delco if you can! (and nowadays they are crap shoots too!):

  • All aftermarket heater cores are junk (Delphi used to be decent so I grabbed one years ago).
  • Aftermarket Optisparks (as we all know).
  • Aftermarket ICMs (as we all should know).
  • Aftermarket ign coils (even name brands like Crane and MSD have failed me).
  • Aftermarket fuel injectors (send originals out to be cleaned and tested).
  • Aftermarket direct-replacement cat converters (excluding high perf ones).
  • Any stock exhaust parts, reuse existing pipes or replace with full stainless.
  • Dorman exhaust manifolds (passenger side... went through 3 before one fit correctly).
  • O2 sensors (Bosch do not work well IMO, Denso works fine, Delphi and Delco work best).
  • Reman water pumps (leak out weep hole).
  • New Gates water pumps (leak out weep hole -- a paper came with it that says this is normal and not a failure! LOL!).

I'm sure there are others that I'll add later.

Successes with disclaimer:
  • Spectra Premium fuel pump/sending unit combos are decent. The wiring harnesses leave more to be desired, so I usually upgrade them before dropping them in. Keep in mind that even though the wires look thin, the insulation is a special gasoline resistant coating and very thin, almost like an enamel coating, so it gives the illusion that the wires are ridiculously thin. Granted they are still too thin IMO, but I've used them both out of the box AND with upgraded wiring and both are holding up fine to this day (5+ years). So the panic over the crappy wires might be unfounded. Then again, we'll see next time I need to drop the tank. They may assume that keeping the thin wires submerged in gasoline will keep them cool... assuming you keep tank at least half full, which I try to do anyways to ensure the fuel pump is properly cooled. Over 10 years ago, I did get a miswired one. So always check the wires on these.

  • Reman Corvette Starters. While these usually work quite well, I have had one bad reman over years, so it depends. If you want new, go for the Remy. Or better yet, the Powermaster Nippon-Denso starters are great.
 

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It might have someone looking for the factory type tube .
While they are well renowned for not being "warm and fuzzy" they have a lot of good stuff.
 

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Successes with disclaimer:
  • Spectra Premium fuel pump/sending unit combos are decent. The wiring harnesses leave more to be desired, so I usually upgrade them before dropping them in. Keep in mind that even though the wires look thin, the insulation is a special gasoline resistant coating and very thin, almost like an enamel coating, so it gives the illusion that the wires are ridiculously thin. Granted they are still too thin IMO, but I've used them both out of the box AND with upgraded wiring and both are holding up fine to this day (5+ years). So the panic over the crappy wires might be unfounded. Then again, we'll see next time I need to drop the tank. They may assume that keeping the thin wires submerged in gasoline will keep them cool... assuming you keep tank at least half full, which I try to do anyways to ensure the fuel pump is properly cooled. Over 10 years ago, I did get a miswired one. So always check the wires on these.

  • Reman Corvette Starters. While these usually work quite well, I have had one bad reman over years, so it depends. If you want new, go for the Remy. Or better yet, the Powermaster Nippon-Denso starters are great.
Nope, lol. My nightmare started with a Spectra sending unit/pump setup. So many people talked about how awesome it was and that I would be happy with it. So I bought one and installed it and began having problems with prolonged engine starts. Pulled the unit and the plastic line had a pinhole in it, SMH. So, I installed the DELPHI unit and spent weeks dealing with the BS that came along with it.
 

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I won't say the Spectra Premium unit is awesome. An original quality AC Delco unit would be much better. And even the AC Delco unit would only be "awesome" if it came with a corrected linear sweep sending unit so the gas gauge was actually correct for a change. Now that would be awesome.

Otherwise... we have what we have. My disclaimer for Spectra units is that one needs to look it over carefully, including the wires, hoses, and metal tubes BEFORE installation. In your case though, a pinhole would have been hard or impossible to see. A friend did get a bad unit that had burrs and leaked at the quick disconnect. I can't recall if that was a Spectra or not. I guess it's a crapshoot no matter what. But I've had more good experiences with these Spectra Premium units than bad, and I've done a few over the years.
 

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That was the same info I based my purchase on. "I've installed dozens and NEVER had a problem". lol.

Hindsight I should have just left the original SU the &^$# alone. It had a new Delco pump but was off a bit and moved around a lot when driving. Spectra unit did the same and both of my DELPHI units were wonky. Current one is a complete mess but I fill the car up every Saturday and drive the same distance every week so I don't care how much it thinks is in the tank.
 

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Yeah, it can be a crapshoot. But I don't think you would have been better off with the original SU to be honest if it was an OEM Delco original.

FWIW, all of the original Delco units were WAYYYYYY off the gauge readings. Every OEM stock unit I encountered would stay on F for like 200 miles and then drop like a rock after that. It was a real thing... back in the 90s, at Impalapalooza (now pretty much replaced by the ISS Nationals), there was a vendor selling electronic calibration kits that got wired inline to "correct" this known problem. I vividly remember this.

Keeping a used 25 year-old original Delco in the car is of little benefit. In fact, usually the Delco wiring harness has burned up by now too. You can maybe try to R&R the Delco unit, but the replacement parts to swap in will be modern junk anyways. And as I just mentioned, the sender is crap when these cars were new.

FWIW, after I got the Spectra units, the gauge seems to drop more linearly, not perfect, but better and the rod can be bent for calibration. I've done enough of these that I can drop it in an empty tank and eyeball the curve, and determine if I need to bend it more one way or the other. I do have a spare tank that I've used for practice. I tend to prefer a calibration bend in the rod that takes me to 19-20 gallons on a fill-up as soon as the light turns on.

One thing to note: If anybody notices more bounce on the gauge, that is not due to the sender. The gauge is worn out. GM put a drop of tacky oil on the gauge pivot to dampen the movements. That tacky oil dries up after all these years. Once that dries up, all of the gauges begin to bounce more. Oil pressure (if you have a 9C1 sender) bounces around, temp sensor bangs wildly to H when you crank the key, etc. I have yet to find a source for this tacky oil to restore the dampening effect. In this state, it does make the gas gauge seem a bit insane.
 
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