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Discussion Starter #1
So I needed to give me '91 LO5 9C1 a boost with a power pack.......and the engine barely turned over.......I had to hold the key in the crank position awhile for the engine to turn over....weird since the battery, an 800 AMP one, which is barely 2 months old,

While cranking it holding the key, it started to smell like some electrical components were heating up

The car finally started...


While driving, looks like the battery or alternator was struggling, the lights in the dash board were flickering, and getting stringer every time I accelerated.

Less than a mile later, the car died, and would not start or crank.

I removed the battery, charged it at slow rate at home.......put the battery back in, and while the dash comes on, the engine wont turn over or crank at all when I put the key in start/crank mode.



Did I fry the starter??? Or maybe killed the battery?

The power pack died too.

On another note, while going through the fuses, found the 25 AMP fuse (slot 15) melted. Apparently, this is the fuse for the rear defogger.
Coincidence? or related?
 

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"So I needed to give me '91 LO5 9C1 a boost with a power pack......."Why? Considering the battery just 2 months old, need to know what else happened before that to get a dead batt. Left lights on overnight?

"While driving, looks like the battery or alternator was struggling, the lights in the dash board were flickering,...."

Sounds like battery dead, the car barely got running with just that powerpack, and then expired finally running out of just battery juice. That new battery could have shot craps, but if you manage to get the car started it should run fine despite that. I'ma go with bad or incorrectly wired alt until hearing alot more.



Curious, - did the charger show the battery took a good charge? If so, you may in fact have a broke starter or something binding it up (cracked flexplate, loose bolt(s)).
 

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On another note, while going through the fuses, found the 25 AMP fuse (slot 15) melted. Apparently, this is the fuse for the rear defogger.
Coincidence? or related?
Sounds to me like you have a direct short in the rear defroster that is draining the battery and melting the fuse. I would spend more time looking into that issue.


Mike--94MSP9C1
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well everything was fine with this car , never had any issues, it just sat a for a few weeks since it got the battery in early June, I did find it odd that a battery would go low sitting for a few weeks in the middle of summer,,,,,,,

I did remove the fuse for the defogger, but I need to get the car started, I pretty much abandoned it where it stopped, luckily there was a parking spot close by, but I need to move it soon, would rather start it , than tow it.

So going to try to swap the battery, in case the battery itself was the problem.

On slow trickle, the battery took almost a day to re charge, yet when I hooked up the battery to the charge, the needle indicated that the battery was almost %100 charged,
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I checked the fuse box, except for the defogger fuse, every other fuse is OK. Are there other fusible links to the starter?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Problem solved

Well, I changed out the battery and installed an old battery, a 700 CCA INTERSTATE to replace the 2 month old over 800 CCA WALMART battery.....

SO with the older INTERSTATE battery, the car started up right away.........

SO either the car had a very bad battery, or the boost fried the battery......
 

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Well, I changed out the battery and installed an old battery, a 700 CCA INTERSTATE to replace the 2 month old over 800 CCA WALMART battery.....

SO with the older INTERSTATE battery, the car started up right away.........

SO either the car had a very bad battery, or the boost fried the battery......

OR the direct short in the rear defroster drained the battery to the point of damaging it before the fuse melted?????
 

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OP

as noted the defogger short likely drained the 2 month old Walmart battery to death before melting the fuse. You need to resolve the defogger issue, or just leave the fuse out and go without a RW defogger.

Walmart battery's are made by Johnson Controls which makes most of the battery's branded under various chain auto part stores. I have a Walmart 78 in my 67 Camaro (swapped to side post battery) and a AZ one in the SS...both are Johnson Control battery's but Walmart is 1/2 the $ for the same battery

If you probe the defogger fuse terminals (without fuse) for +12vdc without the defogger being turned on and you get +12vdc....you have a dead short from the defogger. Maybe somewhere in the wires to the fuse block or defogger/window area/connection itself

BTW if the battery was a AGM type that fully drained....those kind of batteries do not come back very well on a charge
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yepp,

I have not dismissed the defogger yet. Just have not had time to race that issue. Unless boosting it somehow caused that short...

For now, I have the fuse out of the defogger slot.

Thanks
 

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Yepp,

I have not dismissed the defogger yet. Just have not had time to race that issue. Unless boosting it somehow caused that short...

For now, I have the fuse out of the defogger slot.

Thanks

I honestly believe that you are going to find that the defroster issue is the reason the battery went dead in the first place and it was a direct short that drained the battery to the point of doing permanet damage to the battery. The fact that the jump pack had issues tells me that your battery was damaged and the jump pack could not overcome this issue. Find that short and I fully expect your battery issues will resolve themselves. PLEASE keep us informed on what you find. Thank You.


Mike--94MSP9C1
 

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OP

as noted the defogger short likely drained the 2 month old Walmart battery to death before melting the fuse. You need to resolve the defogger issue, or just leave the fuse out and go without a RW defogger.

If you probe the defogger fuse terminals (without fuse) for +12vdc without the defogger being turned on and you get +12vdc....you have a dead short from the defogger. Maybe somewhere in the wires to the fuse block or defogger/window area/connection itself

BTW if the battery was a AGM type that fully drained....those kind of batteries do not come back very well on a charge
There are a few threads dealing with the unique issues of charging of an AGM battery that has been completely discharged.
It involves putting a good battery in parallel with the discharged AGM, putting the battery charger on so it sees the good battery and will provide a charging current that will charge the dead AGM...
There’s a little more to it.
Do a search on “Charging Dead AGM batteries” and I’m sure several threads and posts will come up for you to do some research on the topic.
Your new battery might not be totally ruined and in fact may be revitalized and recoverable.
I accidentally drained my Optima AGM before, and just putting a charger on it, wouldn’t do anything to charge the battery, until I used the two batteries in parallel trick and brought my AGM back to full life and cranking abilities.
It has something to do with how a standard battery charger “sees” a dead AGM battery and will not supply a charging current to it.
Check it out before you toss out a $200+ AGM battery...
That’s ‘IF’ it’s an AGM battery...
 

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AGM battery's are not ideal for cars that are not used often as they don't take recharging well especially if they have drained to the point the starter will not crank. IDK about doing a parallel charge and if that is the work around to bring a drained one back but if it worked for you great

They are good for DD, off road (they can take more vibrations than a lead/acid battery and don't "spill") and fiberglass body cars where battery acid can damage the fiberglass (Vettes have them)

I have the 96 SS and a 67 Camaro. Both "pleasure" cars that can go weeks without use so I use regular sealed lead/acid 78's (side post) battery's in both. I will put them on a charger to bring them back to 12.5+ vdc if the car has been sitting for a month or so unused. That rarely happens
 

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AGM battery's are not ideal for cars that are not used often as they don't take recharging well especially if they have drained to the point the starter will not crank. IDK about doing a parallel charge and if that is the work around to bring a drained one back but if it worked for you great
It’s worked for me and many others who have used this method.
Definitely not just some off the wall hit and miss “I hope it works” fix. It absolutely works...
Do a search, as I did, and there are several threads and posts that discuss the reasons the AGM’s won’t take a charge when completely drained or close to it, and the types of battery chargers best suited for the different types of batteries being charged.
It’s been over a year or I would list the info myself on exactly how to go about it, and why to do it, but I don’t want to make a mistake due to a memory lapse.
But I guarantee that as long as none of the cells are shorted out, the posts are not broken, and the battery isn’t total junk, the parallel battery charging method DOES work, and will revive an undercharged AGM that seems like it won’t take a charge.
Any of my vehicles or bikes that don’t get driven or ridden at least once or twice a month get put on trickle charge using my multi bank auto shut off trickle charger.
 

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I believe the process is to disconnect the undercharged AGM battery from the vehicle.
Connect it using jumper cables to a good wet cell battery, positive terminal to positive, negative terminal to negative.
Then put the battery charger on the good fully charged wet cell battery, it’s a little tricky to get the clamps on with the cables in place but it’s easily enough done.
Then turn on the battery charger to a standard 10 amp charge and give it a couple hours.
Turn off the charger, remove charger clamps, and disconnect the jumper cables.
At that point, you should have enough of a charge in the AGM (if not a full charge) that when connected, the voltage detected by the charger will now allow it to apply a charge current to the previously unchargeable AGM as if it was regular battery needing a charge.
Most chargers out there will not allow themselves to produce the initial current required to bring an AGM back to a full charge. It’s a safety circuit designed to not produce charging current in excess of the normally needed amount and sees it as a shorted circuit of sorts and keeps itself from actually producing any current that would charge the dead AGM battery.
The wet cell tricks the charger into thinking the current and voltage needed is within normal expected limits and will then allow itself to produce a charging current, which will go mostly into the AGM (why it’s connected in parallel) and charges it.

I took an almost brand new Optima Red Top AGM I accidentally ran almost completely dead when my alternator wire came loose, so dead that it wouldn’t take a charge, and was about to go into Autozone and try to return it (which may not have gone well, buyer stupidity isn’t covered by the warranty).
I hit up the ISSF members of this forum and within minutes had this information coming in from several members.
I did exactly what I described above and have had a perfectly like new working AGM battery since.
That was over a year ago...
I wonder how many AGM batteries that cost hundreds of dollars, that were still perfectly fine have been tossed and replaced when it wasn’t absolutely necessary.
 
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