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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ordered a wideband O2 setup recently and it arrived the other day. It came from Tech Edge and with the options I chose, came to $258 and change. This isn’t an easy way to go, but it sounded like a fun project. Is there any interest in seeing this kit put together? I’d be happy to document it here if anyone would like to see it.

A couple photos of what I’m working with. The first photo shows the parts of the controller kit. The second photo shows the controller kit still packaged up with the O2 sensor and cable components.
 

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Jim, Get it on Bud. I don't know much about them. I have been reading at times though. I would like the info. Always good to learn something new. I'm sure others would be interested too.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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Looks like fun, but I'm weird like that and enjoy assembling my own electronics. What kind of soldering setup do you use?

I did a 14point7 slc controller several years ago...worked very well.
Never heard of or seen tech edge before
 

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You Made Me Look

I searched the topic a bit and appears an alternate to pc datalogging??? Interesting that you picked the more interesting old 'Heathkit' approach to plug in brands carried by the speed shops. I'd be interested tracking your build and install - and benefits with it.
 

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I searched the topic a bit and appears an alternate to pc datalogging??? Interesting that you picked the more interesting old 'Heathkit' approach to plug in brands carried by the speed shops. I'd be interested tracking your build and install - and benefits with it.
I know this is a recent post and hasn't gotten any legs yet, however I see mostly us old fudds showing interest so far. Hmmmmmm.. I wonder if that means something.:nerd: I need a pocket protector to go with my new suspenders.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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....Hmmmmmm.. I wonder if that means something.:nerd: I need a pocket protector to go with my new suspenders.

Mark: Snowman-33

Yah, 2 things. For folks that get out it means it's NYE and they all like preparing to consume mass fluid ounces and suffer system poisoning and hopeful recovery tomorrow. Plus, I think it means us old fudds get interested with new stuff (well, new to me anyway) that takes a little tinkering and aforethought v. one-click Amazon Prime life. lol And your new pocket protector sounds easy - unless it has to fit a circular slide-rule.



Interested in 'ol Jim's progress - seems like decent return on effort for fuel monitoring. But from what I read don't you need two sensors to read both banks?
 

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Hey Bob, no more alckyhaul for me. It does seem as if we, you and I, find interest in a another new shiny object. I've wondered also about the 2 sensors. I now have to ask if it would work with my LO5 9C1 ECU and an EBL. Lots more research for the new year. It makes my head ache without imbibing.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, I’ll post it up as I go. This won’t likely be a high speed build. I have to finish up a head gasket and injection pump install on my truck first (which of course snowballed into several other little upgrades). I also just stuck my hand in the lathe chuck, so that is going to slow me down... and make typing darn tough.

Looks like fun, but I'm weird like that and enjoy assembling my own electronics. What kind of soldering setup do you use?
My soldering equipment? Ha! No temp control or any of that. Just a simple radio shack soldering iron with a very fine tip. Not the best tool for the job, but it has worked well for me for a couple other projects like this.

Interested in 'ol Jim's progress - seems like decent return on effort for fuel monitoring. But from what I read don't you need two sensors to read both banks?
Yeah, surely will need 2 to monitor both banks. I'm not sure that I care to monitor both banks at the same time. We'll have to see where this goes. The controller has a simulated NB output. I think this output is also programmable so that I might be able to use this as part of a lean burn strategy. I'm not sure yet exactly how I'll use this. I'll just learn as I go.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A little update:

I didn’t provide a lot of detail in my first post, so I thought I could clarify things a bit more. I went with the 2Y2 kit. There is also a 2Y1 kit listed on the site that is an older version and is a couple dollars cheaper, but it was out of stock when I ordered. For only a couple dollars difference, I’d probably go with the 2Y2 kit again since it supposedly fixes a couple problems with the 2Y1 kit and it is updated to accept a built-in display. I am not going to use a display at this point, but it might be nice to add one later.

I ordered the kit with the LSU 4.9 sensor. I haven’t done any other research, but the wbo2 site indicates this is the latest and greatest sensor to use and is as cheap or cheaper than the previous options.

I also ordered a kit to build a harness to connect the sensor to the 2Y2 along with the correct connector for the LSU 4.9 sensor. I saw somewhere in the instructions that building the harness may be the hardest part. I’m not sure why this would be, but I guess I’ll find out. I was thinking about building the harness first, but I’m not sure how much length I’ll need and I don’t really want a lot of extra that I’ll have to bundle up somewhere. So it looks like the cable will get put off.

The 2Y2 kit does not have a complete set of instructions on the website. The 2Y1 kit does. The kits are very similar, so I plan to just use the 2Y1 instructions while referencing the drawings and photos they provide for the 2Y2.
I might get a chance to do a little assembly today. If so I’ll get some photos posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
1st day of building:

I spent around 4 hours or so today laying parts out, looking over instructions, and starting to build. It went fairly smoothly. The first photo shows the info for the soldering iron and solder I’m using. The iron has worked well for most of what I’ve done so far. It was a little small for the large legs on one of the diodes.

Below is a photo of the empty board. This is how it is delivered – as you would expect, completely empty. One very nice surprise was that many of the resistors are labelled already. This saves a lot of time trying to read color codes or measuring them. I still verified each resistor with the multimeter before I installed it, but there was no searching. The labels weren’t perfect: Some resistors labelled 1k were actually 1.5k, which had me scratching my head for a while. But overall a big time saver.

The resistors pretty much all lay flat on the board so they are a good place to start. They won’t be in the way much for the larger, taller components. Locate the correct resistor, bend the legs to fit the holes in the board, stick it through, and solder it on the back side. Here are a few photos of the process, but I’m not going to bore you all with photos of every step.

The last photo is where I left off for the day. There are about 36 resistors, 9 diodes, and an inductor installed.

***** NOTE*****
I got ahead of myself a little bit and forgot about a couple of changes required to the circuit board. Tech Edge warns of this on their site and shows the modifications. I should not have installed R19. See the next post for correction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Don't forget the board modifications!

I edited the post above to warn of an error I made. Here are some more details.

The R19 resistor should not get soldered into the board like the rest. Only the left leg gets soldered in. The right leg gets connected to another pin with wire that is supplied in the kit.

This wire is also used to make a jumper for 2 pins of U7.

I took a few photos of the modifications. I don't have a solder sucker or a braid to pull the solder out, so I just heated the leg of the resistor and pushed it back through the board. A little more heating on the other side and it popped right out. Then I bent it up and soldered it to the wire. I included a photo of the U7 jumper wire on my finger for scale. Some of this stuff is pretty small.

Also note that these modifications are different if you are using the display.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cappy day

I worked on the capacitor installation today. There were 33 capacitors included in the kit, but 34 on the parts list. Hmm. How do I install more capacitors than they give me?? Not only that, but the quantities are wrong as well. I’m actually 2 short on the 104 caps and have an extra 102.

I guess I have some searching to do on the website to see if there have been changes to the kits that aren’t documented on the main pages.

At any rate, here is a picture of the current progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I sent an email off to Tech Edge and got a reply within a half hour. He basically said "Are you sure you're not looking for capacitors on the display part of the board?" Derp. Sure enough. C38 and C40 (as labelled on the board and parts list) are both part of the display option. They are not needed for my build and not included in my kit. In my defense, the resistor section of the parts list was broken up to indicate which resistors were for the display option. The capacitor section of the list was not.

I have one more capacitor to install now and I'll move on the the semiconductors.
 

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So what's the end result? The ability to monitor air/fuel rations in true time?

I'm not clear on what the objective is of the kit?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm not sure if I understand exactly what you are asking, so I'm not sure if this will answer your question or not. But here are some of my thoughts:

With the ability to program the outputs and configure the kit in different ways, there is quite a bit of flexibility. I can't speak to what others may shoot for as an end result - I suspect some guys just like to have numbers flash at them or another gauge to look at. That's not really my thing. I don't have a lot of interest in watching the AFR while driving. Perhaps it would be helpful for troubleshooting or early problem detection. I can always add a gauge down the road if I change my mind.

I’m going to run the wide band (WB) output to an unused pin of the PCM so that I have the WB reading in my EEHack logs. I'll initially use the WB readings to get close on WOT tuning. Beyond that, I'm not sure how I'll use it. Since it has a simulated narrow band output (NBsim), I could use it to eliminate a standard O2 sensor - though I'm not sure I see much benefit in that. The NBsim output is programmable, so I could also set it up to simulate an O2 sensor "switching" at 16 or 17:1. Then set up a switch to automatically flip back and forth between the standard O2 sensor and the NBsim at a particular throttle percent or intake pressure range. With some careful tuning, I think this would allow a computer controlled, closed loop lean cruise mode. This would of course require a second WB setup for the second bank.

Alternatively, the NBsim could be programmed to switch at 13.4:1. Then perhaps I could leave closed loop enabled but switch to NBsim at high loads. Then I would have computer controlled PE.

What will I end up doing? I don't know. We'll see. For now I'm just enjoying putting the kit together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I put in a few more hours on this project on Sunday. I got the last capacitor installed. It actually goes on the back of the board. A test fit after install revealed that the cap was hitting the case, so I laid it over. Looking back at it now: Since I’m not using the display part of the board, I could have put that capacitor on the top side with everything else. There is no display component there to interfere. Hind sight.

Then I moved on to the IC sockets, LED’s, fuse and holders, connectors, potentiometer, switch – basically everything else to finish up the board. This all went pretty well. I just followed the instructions for the 2Y1 board. I included a photo showing that the installation of the largest IC socket is less than ideal. I did not have the socket held tight to the board when I soldered it. All of the pins came through and are all soldered well, but the socket is floating above the board at one end. It should work fine, but it is sloppy construction.

The 8 pin round socket to plug in the O2 sensor was probably the most challenging part. Soldering the connector to the transition circuit board was easy enough, but getting the transition board properly positioned relative to the main board and getting 8 tiny wires lined up and soldered took a lot of test fitting and trial and error.

At this point I should be ready to give it some power and perform the initial 5 volt checks. Then I can install the IC's and the Lambda module. Then I guess I'm going to have to go out in the cold and put in an O2 sensor bung.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I’ve been reading and researching how to connect the WBO2 controller to the PCM so that I can log it with EEHack. I’m going to run the WBlin+ output to pin D27 of the PCM. This is an unused pin. The PCM will not be able to use the WBO2 data, but it will be able to broadcast it so that EEHack can log it. Deciding on D27 was the easy decision. Deciding how to use WBlin- and the “differential output” feature of the WB02 controller for improved accuracy is proving more difficult.

If the WBO2 controller ground is slightly different than the PCM ground, the indicated AFR/Lambda will lose accuracy. The WBO2 controller may be trying to output 3.5 volts (for example), but the PCM may read it as 3.6 or 3.4 or whatever due to slight differences in ground voltage. The WBlin- connection can be used to tie the WBO2 controller to the PCM ground which should improve accuracy. At a minimum, I will run the WBlin- to a PCM ground pin such as A2, A18, C32, or D1.

However, I wonder if there is a better pin to use as a ground reference? The WBO2 controller is basically acting like a sensor for the PCM. So, I looked at how the other sensors connect: The trans temp, coolant temp, and MAP sensors use pin B16 as a ground. The intake air temp, throttle position, and AC pressure sensors use pin B6 as a ground. Would one of these pins be better to use? This is only a guess, but right now I’m leaning towards using B16. Anyone out there more versed in electronics willing to give me any pointers? Or perhaps someone knows more about the PCM and can tell me which sensor ground was intended for use with pin D27?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
What is it, like 3.5 years later and I finally pulled this project back off of the shelf?
I originally expected that this would be permanently or at least semi-permanently installed on the wagon. But then I bought the 2011 and then I put a cam in it and then I started tuning it with narrowband and NOW I want wideband feedback to better dial in speed density. So, this wideband O2 project is turning into just a tuning aid. At least for now.
Since this is now likely to get moved between vehicles, I decided to just do a short power cable. I keep weatherpack connectors on hand so I can make up vehicle specific power harnesses to connect to this as I need them.
Wood Textile Electronic device Wire Font

Circuit component Wood Electrical wiring Cable Gas

Wood Tool Musical instrument accessory Hardwood Cable

I connected 12v and got a green light! Happy to see I did something right!
Passive circuit component Circuit component Hardware programmer Microcontroller Electronic engineering

Tomorrow I’ll plan to check out the 5v busses and figure out the next steps.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The 5v busses checked out at 5.03 and 5.04 volts. Well within the acceptable 4.9 to 5.1v range.
Instructions indicate the RS232 cable is only partially assembled, but they must have made a change. The cable shipped in my kit is assembled and appears ready to use. Next up is installing the IC's into all of their sockets.
 
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