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Discussion Starter #1
I just picked up a 95 RMS. The driver door was replaced and they cut the wiring harness inside the car behind the hood release. Looking for a way to fix this. Is there any way better than splicing all these wires? Ugh.
 

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Geesh, what a hack job. The only thing that struck me to fix this would be to get some male & female connectors(maybe weatherpac) and start lining everything up. You may have to pull the wires out of the door and then put the connector back in to plug them together. It may also take several connectors to fit in the opening. At least with this way it would look clean and be secure.
I just reread your post and looked at the pic. I thought it was inside the door. Just get some connectors to be able to plug the wire together. Hope this helps you out.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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IMHO I would solder each wire back together using heat shrink over the soldered connection.

It may be easier to pull the door panel so you can unplug the various connectors and "back feed the harness through the door so you have some wiggle room for all the solder connections you need to do

Sucks that all of this will be somewhat "under dash" work. Maybe pull the DS seat for more room for you to work in

Once all wires are soldered back together wrap up all with electrical tape as a bundle. Pull harness back into door and plug n door connections and check every switch function before you button up the door.

It is all fixable, just sucks someone did a hack job but salvage yards are "cut & pull" for parts

Don't do crimp connections
 

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Use "solder sleeves". That will be easier than trying to crimp each wire, or soldering each one and then covering with shrink-tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That’s what I was afraid of. Wasn’t a junk yard thing. The guy who started the work just didn’t know I guess. The door panel is off. This is a project car - and more than I realized. I’m learning body adjustment (or trying) and now electrical. If I solder and shrink tube them are they long enough as is or do I need to splice extensions? As long as there’s an inch of play I should have enough.
 

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I don't know if information is in the FSM, but I'd want to confirm that there's no 'master connector' joining all the door wiring as an assembly back into the main wiring loom somewhere further inboard under there.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I pulled back the carpet and checked back to about the middle of the front seat. I’m pretty sure there isn’t. I think I’m going to be wrestling on my back in a tight spot.
 

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IMHO I would solder each wire back together using heat shrink over the soldered connection.

It may be easier to pull the door panel so you can unplug the various connectors and "back feed the harness through the door so you have some wiggle room for all the solder connections you need to do

Sucks that all of this will be somewhat "under dash" work. Maybe pull the DS seat for more room for you to work in

Once all wires are soldered back together wrap up all with electrical tape as a bundle. Pull harness back into door and plug n door connections and check every switch function before you button up the door.

It is all fixable, just sucks someone did a hack job but salvage yards are "cut & pull" for parts
BALLSS


Normally I would recommend exactly the same thing, but with so little extra wire and such a restricted position crimped splices might be the way to go. To do a proper solder splice the wire should be mechanically connected first.(Search western union splice) and this will use up your limited wire length. For those new to soldering just connecting wire with a solder blob does not work well. A crimp splice has two advantages for your project: Less stripped wire is needed, and you can use the crimp tool with one hand while controlling the spliced wire with the other. Trust me it will be hard to properly solder these wires. As the work progresses it will get harder to spice the wires together then apply the heat then the solder.


Before the whole forum expresses their opinion I would like to remind all that both land vehicles, water vehicles, and aircraft are assembled with crimp connectors. If you are willing to buy a quality ratcheting crimp tool and all sizes of some high quality crimp splices you can make a proper crimp connection that will pass a "tug of war" or pull test where the wire will fail before the crimp to wire connection fails.



Crimp splices with silicone inside them would be best, and heat shrink over them for extra protection.


Normally I would solder and heat shrink a splice. Do not try to do this with crimping pliers, it is too hard to make a proper crimp with them. If you use a ratcheting crimp tool and connector try some test crimps before going to the car.


Good luck with a project that is very physically challenging.
 

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Z, I have been told in the past by a friend who attended a session about automotive wiring and solder vs crimping was part of it. He said that the crimp was superior to the solder. Look at the ground connections on our cars. Then too Fred has stated in the past about soldering GM wire. Now. The reason I mentioned the connectors. I saw how limited the space was and trying to get in there and crimp two wires together and the bundle making things tighter and tighter with each splice. Add to that trying to heat shrink individual connections. It becomes almost impossible in that location. If he crimps in connectors it just seems as if it would be easier. Do one side then the other and plug it in. Yes the tool to crimp weatherpac would add to the cost but then it's another tool for possible later repairs. Just my thought on all this.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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If he crimps in connectors it just seems as if it would be easier. Do one side then the other and plug it in. Yes the tool to crimp weatherpac would add to the cost but then it's another tool for possible later repairs. Just my thought on all this.
gbhs72


This way would work well, if cost was not a issue I would do it. But if you do not have access to a wholesale source for the weatherpac parts and tool the cost can be stunning(at least where I am). The crimp pins are not expensive but the shells seem costly.



A good ratcheting crimping tool will have changeable dies. One could get the weatherpac dies later when there is no option but to use them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Wow. Great feedback everyone. I’ve been thinking about which method to use and considered how difficult soldering in there would be, specially with only two hands and laying at an odd angle. Crimps will be difficult due to the space as well, but at least if I put on connectors I’ll have a little more room to work.

I’m not familiar with the tools or connectors I’d use. Can someone recommend some specific parts or name them so I can find them? If I’m going to do the job, I’d like to do it once with good connectors.

I’m still open to the other ways if I can get in there without cursing my decision at every moment.
 

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I generally use Sta-Kon Non-Insulated Splices for my automotive wiring.
Strip the wires in preparation for splicing according to the Butt Type instructions. Slide a piece of heat shrink over one of the wires. Now crimp the two wire together using the Sta-Kon crimping tool. Now use your soldering iron and add a little solder to the connection as well. Finish the connection by sliding the heat shrink over the butt splice and heat with a Heat Shrink Gun.
 

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I have been using a Ideal 30-500 for nearly 20 years. The new ones are prettier. You can get dies for cable, internet, weatherpac, and more. The ratchet system will grab the crimp splice and will not let go until it is completely crimped or you hit a emergency release. They are a poor man's version of the aircraft and manufacturing plant tools.



The better crimp connectors have a nylon plastic cover. As mentioned before some have silicone grease inside and may have built in heat shrink. The three different colors will span 22ga to 10ga



I keep saying crimp connector but the industrial parts guy may understand butt splice.
 

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madamorr, I have some like you're picture but they are Kline. Shoot HF even sells some now. I like the ones Z showed also. I was thinking some more about this situation and maybe I got folks onto the idea of only using weatherpac. Even some 4 wire trailer flat connectors would work. They would be a little bulky and would have to be clearly marked, The price wouldn't be too bad using those. It's just so much easier to work down under there when you have the wires in separate bundles. Then all you do is line up the correct connector and he's done. (PC correctness, I didn't say she's done) I've wired more than one patrol car and working in some ungodly position is rough on the back and attitude. Makes me say words I shouldn't say.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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10 window wires
3 lock wires
8 mirror wires
8 power seat wires
2 door light


31 connections to be made. This is one of the reasons I suggest a one circuit at a time splice. The best of us would lose a lot of time to double checking the connectors in a plug shell. Make a mistake or two and you have to do a lot of diagnostic work.


I also think a plug would be the "best way" but it chews up time and money.


Special ratcheting crimp tools are mandated by aircraft manufactures for legal repair of their aircraft because the ratcheting crimp tools will repeat a correct crimp every time and are not dependent on human feelings of force or on hand strength. You get the same crimp even when your hand is tired or sore. Because they hold the crimp you can not drop the crimp while you adjust the wire. You can use them right or left handed.
 

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Uncle!!!!
I counted 17 wires but I trust you. To me the Best way would be to buy the correct color & gauge wire with any trace and then replace it all the way. I think we have beat this to death and now it's up to Beengone to make his decision on time and money he want's to invest.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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The wiring for the door should be part of the cross car harness. Check to see how much of it continues to the cross car harness. You may be able to pull the cross car harness, and the door harness, and do the work in a much more pleasant position.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The wiring for the door should be part of the cross car harness. Check to see how much of it continues to the cross car harness. You may be able to pull the cross car harness, and the door harness, and do the work in a much more pleasant position.
I’m intrigued. By name is it safe to assume there may in fact be another plug somewhere under the carpet. If so, where would this magical item be, and would it require a lot of tear out to get to it?
 

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Uncle!!!!
I counted 17 wires but I trust you. To me the Best way would be to buy the correct color & gauge wire with any trace and then replace it all the way. I think we have beat this to death and now it's up to Beengone to make his decision on time and money he want's to invest.

Mark: Snowman-33
I assume this would mean running new wires to all four doors (windows and locks) the seat, and possibly a couple locations I’ve forgotten. Is that true? The carpet is pretty bad, so I could possibly replace it while doing so depending on price. (I’m deciding whether this is a long-term or short-term car.) the interior is in pretty good shape but does have a few seams coming apart (grey leather). It has just over 100k and some frame rust, but no body rust. Head liner has some issues.

All that to say, If I can do it really right for a little more money and a few more hours, I will. Otherwise, if it can all work for less of both, I’ll just fix and drive.

I’ve not done much body or electrical work on any car, but am willing and able to learn.
 
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