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Hello all,

My Roadmaster has always been a little slow to start. The car has only 60K miles and runs great otherwise.

I recently put in a new starter, so now the engine turns over quickly, which it didn't do before.

Still, I have noticed occasionally that even though the engine is turning over quickly, the car wouldn't always start right away. I have NEVER smelled gas when this happened.

Other times, the car would start very weakly, sputter and almost die. I would coax it to higher RPMs. Usually once it got going it would keep running.

More recently, it wouldn't start at all until after a few tries. This would happen anytime, but most often after the car had been driven on a hot day and was still warm. Again, NEVER a smell of fuel. All the symptoms of no fuel.

So TODAY, I was driving along just after filling the tank (%^#^^*€€!!!) it burped and died. I tried many times to start it with no luck. Kicked a few times but that was it. I was ready to call AAA. (I think a AAA membership is a great thing when you daily drive a B-body!)

A guy nearby who was smarter than me got under the car while I turned on the ignition and said he couldn't hear the pump. I tried listening for it from inside the car before he showed up and I couldn't hear it either.

He suggested that he beat on the underside if the fuel tank while I tried starting the car. Started right up.

So here I am. The car has started a few times since at my house with no problem. I think I should replace the fuel pump so I don't get left somewhere else. The problem is intermittent, so I'm thinking checking the fuel pressure while running won't help.

I got under the car while a friend turned on the ignition at my house. Now I CAN hear the pump, but it doesn't sound really healthy. By this I mean weak compared to my impala, which I can hear easily from inside the car.

Of course I'm going to replace the filter while I'm at it.

Am I right, or am I missing something? Should I just put in a new pump?

Thanks


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Many times they do behave this way,when they're (fuel-pumps) on the way out. Sometimes,they'll work for a while. Usually,the clock is ticking.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!

That's enough for me. I can't think of a better place or time to change the fuel pump than in MY garage on a weekend.


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Changing a fuel pump on these cars is easy. Consider updating with a Walbro 255 and new in tank pump harness.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Changing a fuel pump on these cars is easy. Consider updating with a Walbro 255 and new in tank pump harness.
I'll definitely do that on the impala, but this Roadmaster I'm thinking to keep mostly stock.

Can I get a performance improvement from this with no other mods?

I do have a set of SS wheels for it as soon as I wear out the tires on the stock wheels... :)




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Fuel punp is on its way out and check the harnnes at the pump to I bet its burnt
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks EVERYONE for the help!

The fuel pump is in, and I can definitely see a difference in how the car starts.

The advise provided by you all made this job much easier.


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Discussion Starter #11
hopefully you replaced the in tank harness, or be prepared to do the job over again soon.

9 times out of 10, the harness is the reason for the failure.
No I didn't. I bought one the replacement for the harness inside if the tank, and when I put it next to the OEM u decided to keep the OEM. It was double the gauge of the replacement China POS that was all I could find.

As far as the external harness, the one I have on the car looks perfect, and again, I tried but couldn't find one here in the booming metropolis of Ocala FL.

The car stranded me for a while on Friday. It's a daily driver and I had to fix it over the weekend. I didn't even think about calling the dealership until it was too late.

So at this point it's all in and the only reason it'll come back out is if you're right and I get stranded again.

I hope you're wrong, but I'll let everyone know if I get stranded somewhere.

My Impala WILL get all new stuff though, including the Walbro pump. I have time to wait for stuff for the Impala, but the Roadmaster has to be on the road!

Thanks for the advice, you're the second here to suggest that. It's too late for the Roadmaster, but the Impala will be better for it!


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If you inspected the harness and it looked good, no melted wires, no signs of over-heated connections you will probably be fine. Mine has been fine for years.
 

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No I didn't. I bought one the replacement for the harness inside if the tank, and when I put it next to the OEM u decided to keep the OEM. It was double the gauge of the replacement China POS that was all I could find.....





....My Impala WILL get all new stuff though, including the Walbro pump...
next time look into soldering the intank wiring harness to the pump and the sender passthru, its in the sender refurbishing thread in the stickies.

my personal opinion, unless youre running a power adder or something pushing past 500 hp then the stock pump is adequate.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you inspected the harness and it looked good, no melted wires, no signs of over-heated connections you will probably be fine. Mine has been fine for years.
No problems so far, ran great today. Thanks.


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next time look into soldering the intank wiring harness to the pump and the sender passthru, its in the sender refurbishing thread in the stickies.

my personal opinion, unless youre running a power adder or something pushing past 500 hp then the stock pump is adequate.
Will do on the soldering, great suggestion, thanks Mr pogo!

As far as HP vs pump, my build will be a 396 with AI ported LT4 heads with AI recommend Manley 650" Lift Nextek springs etc., AI custom cam 234/241-108+4 (.613/.597 w/1.6 rocker), AI ported intake, Superdamper, Callies Forged crankshaft, 58mm throttle body, Mezeire WP, Crower stainless shaft rockers, and coated pistons at 11.2 to 1 CR. Not sure yet about the injector size.

I have 1 3/4 primary long tube headers to 3" collectors, followed by 3" clear image exhaust.

NO power adders!!!

I'm THINKING I should get 500HP or better at the flywheel. I'm I delusional on this one? Where do you think I could end up at based on these specs? Really curious on this one, don't be afraid to hurt my feelings!


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that's the way i did mine, chucked the plastic connectors and soldered everything together.

works extremely well, been doing this for years on all the GM vehicles we've worked on, and never had a problem.
 

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I do not get why modern cars require a tank drop to do this! Older cars have an access hole in the truck to change the sending units, which would work for fuel pumps too. One should never have to drop a fuel tank unless they are replacing it.
 

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The access hole would have to be quite large to clear the fuel lines. There would be no way to secure the spare tire. Very few new car purchasers work on their own cars. The complaints from the access panel allowing water to enter the compartment. Those are a few reasons that come to mind,I'm sure there are others.
 

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I never had a water problem with any of my dozens of GM 64-72 A-bodies. But I guess some people did not reseal the access hole properly.

I think I could design a solution to all the problems you mention. However, had I an access panel I would be FAR more likely to change a fuel pump myself.

But a even BETTER solution would be an inline electric fuel pump that is very easy to replace! This in-tank fuel pump is a horrendous idea.
 

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I used to live in WI until 1979, now I am in AZ. While in WI, I would NEVER drive my baby as a daily driver, especially in the winter. My 1957 Thunderbird (and later my 1956 Thunderbird) were my fair weather cars. My 64 and then 66 Thunderbirds were my summer daily drivers.

For the winters, I would buy something out of the junk yard intended to last only one season (a few lasted 2-3 seasons) and typically it would be a $35-$80 Ford Falcon 4dr or a 4dr Plymouth Valiant or Dodge Dart. One time it was a 63 Ford Fairlane 4dr with a 260 V8 and 3 on the tree. That one was so rusted out you could see the road racing under you. I called it my Flintstone car (you could drive it with your feet).

It is beyond me why anyone would drive their baby in the salted-road winters. And why would anyone pay $25-100K or more for a NEW car just to do this?

I would never drive a car I liked in the salt-road winters.

Here in AZ cars from the 40s and 50s (and up) can be found in the junk yards with NO RUST, except for surface rust on the panels where the sun has burned off all the paint.

A "no rust" car from WI would not pass muster in AZ. Here "no rust" really means just that. You can still easily take off exhaust pipe clamps with no help from "Liquid Wrench" from a 40 year old car.

So when I read about people driving their beloved Impalas, Caprices, Roadmasts and ESPECIALLY Fleetwoods, that they spend all kinds of money improving them and making them nice, IN THE SALT ROAD WINTERS, I just have to wonder the economics of the matter.

Buy some rusted out Nissan or Honda for the winter, throw it away in April and be money ahead keeping your baby in the garage until summer.

I would NEVER repair my winter cars, I would take them back to the junk yard and buy another beater, cheaper that way.

I suppose instead of costing $35-$80 they would cost $500-$1000 now, but that is okay.

I also belong to the Aurora club, and it seems they are less likely to drive their cars in the winter than the membership here. Heck some of you guys use your wagons as lumber trucks! Breaks my heart.
 
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