Chevy Impala SS Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
At 146k miles I installed a brand new acdelco sending unit and pump. I managed to squeeze 32k out of the pump before it just up and died.

What is the word on the street for most reliable pump these days? I searched and read for about an hour on here and never came to a real conclusion on this subject.

I read that acdelco was best, walbro was best, spectra was fine, etc...

I guess I could put another ACD in it and go another 30k, but thats actually not acceptable at all....

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,456 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
My previous experience with Delphi was a good for 20 minute pump. Needless to say I took it back and just ordered the acdelco.

Reading on here that was the one brand, next to Bosch, people said not to use. Nothing but terrible quality. I think one guys only lasted 10 minutes IIRC!

Wanted to mention that Delphi was not an option in the original post, but I forgot to.

I appreciate the input however!

Sending unit seems fine too. Just looking for a new pump.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
can you explain the reason the why pump failed ? motor burned up / wiring on pump /pickup seals / pick up tube ?

do you keep the fuel tank fuel level at/below 1/4 ....? these tank designs are not for electric fuel pumps so keep the fuel level above 1/3 or the motor will burn up...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Yesterday replaced the original (or so I believe) pump with Spectra. We will see how long it will last. The wiring inside of the tank and outside was almost perfect. The Here is the picture of the motor I have replaced. 123,000 miles.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
The general decline in quality of replacement parts, is one of the reasons, that, after a lifetime as a "Hands On" Car Guy, I am selling ALL my older vehicles.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
The general decline in quality of replacement parts, is one of the reasons, that, after a lifetime as a "Hands On" Car Guy, I am selling ALL my older vehicles.
the purchase of new vehicle like 2018 models are fabricated with the decline of parts quality. if you get 100K on a 2018 with out a $3K repair or higher that is rare .

the electrical drive train systems are extremely expensive and many times only the manufacturer can do the repairs.

the vehicles are designed to fail after the warranty ends GM has many customers that will never buy another GM vehicle with the expensive repair costs shortly after the warranty is over.. one person 2 weeks ago bought a used 2012 GM truck after a week noticed engine noise . brought to dealership they said the engine noise is normal ... LOL.. 2 weeks later its in limp mode .. brings it back they said it will cost $9K to replace the engine ..
vehicle had less than 100K miles on it..

many did have this type problem under warranty 70K miles and under .. not good when they stated I have to wait 3 weeks for the GM dealership to fix it and no truck LOL..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I usually kept the tank above 1/4. Maybe a few times it fell below because of reasons, but I was aware to keep it from the E.

I havent taken it apart yet to find out the issue/cause for failure.

All I know is that when I last drove it, it was idling funny/rough. Didn't think much of it. Maybe a sensor was acting up or something.

The fuel pump was dying actually. I'm sure if I checked the pressure it would have been very low.

The vehicles I currently own are readily serviceable and have a wealth of aftermarket. Although i wonder about getting rid of the worst part of this car. Either swap in a carbureated motor or a small Cummins would be the cure all for these cars. Then run a FMVB 4L80.

I love my car but I'm not in love with a few select parts of it.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,739 Posts
Running low on fuel definitely kills them quick. There's what the gauge says,and the amount of fuel (usually much less) which doesn't help. Personally,I seldom allow less than half a tank of actual fuel on board. Replaced one pump around 10-12 years ago,and that's it....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
It's true, the fuel pump is like a fish except that it swims in petrol.
If you tend to take on- and offramps really enthusiastically, and you do so with the tank under 1/3 full, your fuel pump is breathing air.
Anyway, point is, don't let your fuel pump breathe air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I usually drive fairly mellow.

It appears as though the few times I let it run low are probably what killed it. I'm going to order another acdelco pump. This one did well for 30k, maybe the next one will go a little longer if I treat it better.

It's funny because my dad usually runs his 09 hatchback down until there is about a quart left(no joke, 12 gallon tank and it's not uncommon to put 11.8 in it) Hes done it since day one and it just ticked 140k. Changes can be good I guess haha

This also gives me a chance to service the evap system line at the SU. Yay.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
I drove my previous Caddy for nine years and 100,000 miles. I ALWAYS refilled after the tank was almost empty and had no problem with the fuel pump, which had 175,000 miles on it (75,000 from original owner plus my 100,000).

To completely submerge your fuel pump you should have almost full tank, by the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I'm actually going to measure the depth of the tank and to the top of the pump from the sender mount. That should allow me to calculate with high precision what level the tank needs to be to have the pump submerged.

I remember the SU is fairly tall and the pump sits up high, so It wouldnt surprise me if anything below 5/8 means the top of the pump is right at fuel level. Keeping the pump about halfway high in fuel should provide enough heatsink to keep it from overheating in theory. Also, it pumps fuel through itself so that has a slight cooling effect as well. Submersion is best as pointed out.

It's funny because the pump on my truck is not submerged. Different kinds of pumps I guess. Still find it interesting. However we do ask for a lot out of these very small pumps. 40 psi and a lot of GPH.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
this tank is not designed for the in tank fuel pump ... this design was and is on my carburetor GM engines..like my 84 Camaro ..



this type vehicle you have , fuel pump requires fuel to cool the pump motor then you should KNOW that fuel is returned back into the fuel tank so low fuel will also increase fuel temps new vehicles have one way fuel supply system NO return line .. this is to reduce fuel temps and create less gas vapors..if you read the fuel pump install instructions it should state do not run low on fuel or the pump will die..


ON gm trucks the owners that have run out of fuel do replace the fuel pumps if they have this happen two or three times...the truck tanks do have a good fuel setup to aid in pump cooling but you go too low then those as well will burn up .. and you will see it as the connections will get hot and discolored..


on my Impala I did install a 400 ohm resister across the sender so that the reading does indicate the proper amount .. the resistor will drop the reading down so on my vehicle it is pretty accurate..common issue as these age , reading shows less fuel in tank , than gauge indicates..


when its at 1/2 tank I can fill it with a little over 10 gallons..so it is indicating less fuel in the tank which is good..



if it indicates more fuel that is bad...



400 ohm resistor works for me but others may have to use other resistances to have it more accurate..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,739 Posts
Not sure why not just take our word for it,but measure away. You want fuel pump to live a long life. Concentrate on keeping it full,or near full most all the time. Running a wire to ground with variable resistance in-line to the sender wire for experimenting with gauge display over time will narrow down the accuracy somewhat. Doesn't change the fact the tank is best kept at 3/4 full,or better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
My gauge is exactly correct. At half full, I put right around 12 gallons in. 23 gallon tank.

This should be fun.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,739 Posts
I would not assume the gauge is accurate over it's entire range based on the half tank display. These gauges are notoriously sketchy. Even a busted clock is right twice a day....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
I would not assume the gauge is accurate over it's entire range based on the half tank display. These gauges are notoriously sketchy. Even a busted clock is right twice a day....

you are very correct on this as the gauge on these, it is sketchy..


with my resistor it does work more accurate.... I noticed that when the gauge dropped to 1/3 area it did indicate more gas in tank than was in it .... the gauge before resistor install would stay too long around the 1/2--1/3 gauge indication..so the tank had too little gas in it.. I never ran out of gas before , but I did over all the years keep it always 1/3 to 3/4 sometimes fill it up to the max if going on a longer than normal run ..put too much in these and not run it the gas will blow out the gas cap ..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
115 Posts
My gauge went wonky last year. 1/2 tanks means empty. Found out the hard way, ran out of gas. I felt like a dunce sitting on the side of the road.
Like I was 16 all over again when I ran out of gas in my 68 Fairlane- vowed that wouldn’t happen again. Still love my land yacht though.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top