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Hello everyone, I'm new to this thread and hopefully someone can help me out. I recently purchased a 1996 impala ss. Okay so im trying to replace my fusible links. Not sure if I should repair them or run a new link from aux post to where they connect to.
I see its 2 wires connected togther at the ring terminal. Does one connect to the starter solenoid and the other to the alternator?
Should I just repair them by cutting the heat shrink tubing and connecting the new one from there or just run a new wire all the way to where they connect to?
 

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I just checked my 94 FSM and two online services for 96 diagrams. I am fairly sure there are no fusible links in the car anywhere.(94-96)

I have been thinking of adding them on the alternator wire and the line to the fuse box. It is common in other cars of this time period.

I would start by getting a factory service manual .
 

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If the factory did not put them there, you are making your car more complicated than necessary.
 

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Fusible links went the way of the dodo bird with introduction of high current under hood fuses. In our cases in the fuse box, often at the battery pos+ terminal. Plug and play installation vs cut and splice.
 

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Fusible links went the way of the dodo bird with introduction of high current under hood fuses. In our cases in the fuse box, often at the battery pos+ terminal. Plug and play installation vs cut and splice.
I have been poking around the panther car's diagrams and it looks like ford was using them in the 1992-2011 period. When they talk about upgrading alternators on line the fusible link is mentioned.
I agree with Fred's KISS (keep it simple) theory but either ford's engineers or lawyers thought a way to disconnect the alternator from a short, or disconnect the car from a shorting out alternator was a good idea.
 

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Fuse links are a massive pain,and doubt even Ford uses them anymore.
 

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I did a quick search. How about GM. 2019 Buick Regal Sportback Fusible Link - GM 84070948, 175 Amp.


If you do not know you would confuse it with a fuse. It is not a part that looks like the old piece of wire but looks like a big fuse module.

Circuit breakers, fuses, and fusible links are products that do different things different ways. When a circuit needs it it will be used.
 

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Hello everyone, I'm new to this thread and hopefully someone can help me out. I recently purchased a 1996 impala ss. Okay so im trying to replace my fusible links. Not sure if I should repair them or run a new link from aux post to where they connect to.
I see its 2 wires connected togther at the ring terminal. Does one connect to the starter solenoid and the other to the alternator?
Should I just repair them by cutting the heat shrink tubing and connecting the new one from there or just run a new wire all the way to where they connect to?
Can you put a photo in this post? It might help if we can see what you have.
 

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Why would anyone add them where none existed before? Just to mess with the next owner?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Okay fixed the problem. Right next to the aux post is a screw with 2 fusible links. Dont know if its stock or not. It was my dad's ss before it was mine and well I cant ask him about it anymore.
 

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Yes... they do have fusible links. My FSM shows 4 in the 91 and a 5th if you have a wagon. The 95 shows two, one feeds external lights circuits and the second feeds hydraulic modulator (ABS). An SEO optioned 95 would add two more links.
 

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Yes... they do have fusible links. My FSM shows 4 in the 91 and a 5th if you have a wagon. The 95 shows two, one feeds external lights circuits and the second feeds hydraulic modulator (ABS). An SEO optioned 95 would add two more links.
The OP has a 96 Impala SS. So no SEO.

Okay so im trying to replace my fusible links. Not sure if I should repair them or run a new link from aux post to where they connect to.
I see its 2 wires connected togther at the ring terminal. Does one connect to the starter solenoid and the other to the alternator?
All I can say is I was not the only one who without a picture assumed that the OP was talking about the alternator power cable and the starter cable.

Apologies to all. A 96 does have a fusible link to ABS and head light switch. The head light switch also has a self resetting circut braker inside it
 

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A fusible link is really just a short section of wire that is purposely under gauged so that it (that section) burns through before overheating and melting a long run of wire. Fusing is (as a function) responsible not for protecting a device, but for protecting the wiring. You always "fuse" a circuit according to the wire gauge size, not the load. So ... a fusible link is a few inches of say 12 gauge wire in an otherwise 10 gauge circuit. As the 10 gauge circuit heats up from a short or overload of some sort, the 12 gauge section melts through before the 10 gauge wire gets hot enough to do the same. This avoids a fire and saves wire and rewiring in a big way. If a starter blows a winding or an alternator shorts a diode, the fusible link can prevent a fire.

Better component designs have reduced the need for fusible links, but they are very common in large current circuits connected directly to very high current sources where fuses are impractical.

That said ... follow proper wiring techniques when replacing same. The length and gauge of the link is important.
 

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"Better component designs have reduced the need for fusible links, but they are very common in large current circuits connected directly to very high current sources where fuses are impractical."

Where would that be? Or is it just a cheap cop out for lazy engineering?
 

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I am really confused why anyone would object to a last chance safety system than could prevent a electrical fire.

Most drivers that maintain their vehicles will go their whole life without ever knowing where the fuses, breakers, and fusible links are or what they do. Ask some drivers in a parking lot where their fuses are, most will have no idea if the car is bone stock.
 

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Why install them why none were present initially is a better question. Maxi-Fuses along with other slow-blow,and circuit breakers that automatically reset are also far less likely to leave one stuck by the side of the road. I'm old enough to remember those fuse links down by the starter,and what a major pain they were.
 

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"Better component designs have reduced the need for fusible links, but they are very common in large current circuits connected directly to very high current sources where fuses are impractical."

Where would that be? Or is it just a cheap cop out for lazy engineering?
Sorry for the delay. What I meant was "failsafe" engineering. You design the component (like an alternator) to fail open, not short. There could be a fusible link inside by design. Believe it or not, some of this "more intelligent" engineering has nothing to do with better designs, but instead with the insurance companies. Alternator company does not want some smart lawyer deciding the fire and death were caused by a faulty alternator design ... so ... at 160A ... melt a link inside the alternator not the wiring to the battery.

In the old days, if you hooked something up backwards, you'd see smoke. Today ... most technology will simply not work, but it will also not melt itself. It costs a few extra bucks to design failsafe systems, but in the end ... all in, cheaper.
 
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