Chevy Impala SS Forum banner

21 - 40 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Any one have any opinions? Not trying to start a converter war, i was about to order a converter for my impala and wanted to know which one to get
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
So now after reading this good thread im wondering do I need to change my Converter if I'm planning to change out my gears to 4:11
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,682 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
No, you do not have to change your converter after installing gears. Be aware though, that going to numerically higher gears (like 3.08 -> 3.73 or 3.08 -> 4.10) will make the stock torque converter feel tighter.

That said, to swap a torque converter requires partially removing the transmission, which is not a quick or easy job if you haven't done it before. It's not impossible, but it's not like changing brake pads either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Did it once when I finished a resto on a toy we have in the fam. but I would not think of doing it to my SS so your opinion is leave the stock one then or change it and if so in changing it what would you recommend for me to go with
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,682 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
My opinion doesn't matter. Change the gears and see how that feels. Decide what you want to do from there, then call several converter manufacturers, tell them all about your car and your plans, and see what they recommend.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,682 Posts
Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
moderator comment

Okay folks, no more requests for "which converter should I get?" on this thread.

If you have technical content to add, please feel free to add it. Otherwise I will be deleting any further questions posted to this thread.

There are already numerous "which converter should I get" threads in this section. Please feel free to read them and post questions to any of those threads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
I can read "no more questions" but this is not about "what should i choose"... he stated a list of places that could do true stall, and EDGE wasn't on the list, making it appear as if EDGE guesses the k-factor. I had asked if this was true of edge, someone else asked if this was true of edge, and no response.

I think it is fair to ask questions regarding clarification of his original post, but not to thread jack and ask random questions about "what tc should i get if im towing" etc etc... But a clarification question should be permitted.. IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,506 Posts
Andre stated to me when I bought my converter that he uses a detailed mathematical formula to create the stator that would provide the right stall for the application. My Edge stalled about 500-600 rpms higher than it should have.

It may not be a problem for many people because they order a converter with lower than optimal stall, and later happy with performance and driveability of a higher stall rating. However, there was a big difference in driveability when your converter flashes to 4400 instead of 3800 (roughly).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
For the not so stock guys it is almost impossible to get a new converter and it stall right at the RPM you wanted. Too many factors that will move a converters numbers. If you want it right than plan on putting the new converter in the car, run it at a track that the car hooks on and pull it back out with the info you now have. Most good companies will adjust the stall speed for free the first time.

The high HP stuff works better with a 10.5 or 11" converter because you don't need more torq. This also holds larger clutch packs if you are still locking it up.

Checking your pump clearence to the converter would be the only other thing I can think of but I have never seen one off. Precision Industries is all I have used and have never had one fail in my car or anyone elses cars in Indianapolis. The other companies may be just as good but have no first hand data.

Converters have always been a "black hole" but there are not as bad as it sounds. I agree that most converter companies can guess pretty good at what you need if you are honest telling them what you have. Fudging the numbers/info you tell them will only make you go slower than telling them the facts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,774 Posts
Maybe someone can post which converters have similar characteristics, like yank 3000 equals edge 3200 etc?
It's been explained before (good posts lost with the forum fiasco)..........but.....like Jeff said, IF you give the converter maker ALL of your vehicle info, Edge will tend to give you a converter that will stall quite a bit higher than what they label it, Vig will be pretty close to slightly high, and Yank will be pretty close to slightly low. And in my experience, the Yanks always drive the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
i was looking to do the s10 convereter. i founf rebuilt one for69.99 + 19.99 s&h no core they also have hd version wth reinforced fins for 99.99 +19.99 s&h. has anyone ever dealt with them before their name is www.torqueconverter1.com thanks for any imput
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
When I had the transmission 'improved' for my 96 RMW, the shop suggested the Corvette torque converter to provide better acceleration, considering the weight of the car. They stated the stall speed is now 2,100 instead of 1,400, as the original would be.

The impression is rather odd with this change. The car feels much less responsive off the line when accelerating lightly (same pedal pressure as before). The car will now also roll backwards down a sloped driveway in 1st at idle, while before it used to crawl slowly up the same driveway at 600 RPM. True enough, watching the tach now, it is necessary to rev the engine to at least 1,500 RPM to prevent the car from rolling backwards, and actually climb the driveway.

Just some things to consider when you switch to a higher stall speed. Not necessarily bad, just takes getting used to since it makes the car feel different.

I have not tried accelerating hard with the new torque converter since I want to give the transmission a fair chance to break-in without beating on it, but driving moderately, it actually seems slower. I know I will get a surprise when the day comes I stab the gas pedal. :)

Regarding lockup with the higher stall converter: driving on the highway, at 75 MPH, the converter is locked, and the engine is at 2,000 RPM (2.93:1 axle)


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
One of the big differences in what each person needs is what they want the car to do or what they want to use the car for. The higher the stall the more the car feels like "Mush" on the street. If you want a great street car then you want low end torque and a converter that applies that torque or lower stall speed. This will make the car feel great on the street and really jump if you give it any throttle or when you want to pass some one. This will not get you the best ET at the track but it rocks on the street. The 2.93 gears give it away that it's a wagon most likely and that gear is not friends with a high stall convertor either.

The higher stalls are better for your ET at the track and needed for larger cams but they will feel just tike your saying. It will roll back on hills and feel, well like mush unless you really floor it and get that convertor past it's stall speed.

It all depends on what you want as to what the right parts/combo is.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,774 Posts
Further to Jeff's point, I had been running a Yank SS3600 converter behind my stock LT1 engine, and although 3600 sounds high for a stock engine setup, it was what was required for optimum ET. And with the super tight feel/efficiency of the Yank SS series of converters, it really wasn't a compromise even in daily driver duty. Be careful though.....many 3600 converters would be downright miserable/sloppy/unacceptable in that application!
Fast forward to the heads/cam motor in the car now......with the same SS3600 converter, the car was very snappy on the road, more torque to the rear tires than available traction, and anyone driving the car would have sworn it was plenty of converter. But at the first track outing, I was not surprised to find sub-par snap off the line with a dead hook..........unacceptable 60' times in the low/mid 1.6's. Stepped up to a 4200 converter next time out, and it was just barely enough on a warm day to let this engine snap to its powerband at the hit (torque peak on this engine is about 4200 rpm), best 60' now is 1.53. A few more outings will tell if some fine tuning will liven things up sufficiently on the launch or if it really wants more stall.
BTW, I tried this same 4200 converter behind the stock engine and even though the 60' times were the same, it cost about 0.2 sec ET and 2 mph trap speed. The stock cam ran out of wind long before the rpm at which the converter needed to operate to achieve good fluid coupling.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,197 Posts
Priceless Torque Converter Information

I usually don't follow posts that directly refer me to a link and would not post a referral myself but for the valuable information contained and the length of the document in this link. I have been considering a spragless converter for my car. Any additional input would be appreciated: http://www.ustperformance.com/documents/RacingTorqueConverterTheory.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
so a corvette (94-94) will stall around 2000

the s10 4.3l (unknown years) will stall at what?
 
21 - 40 of 59 Posts
Top