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Hello. I recently found rear end problems in my (not clone) 1995 Impala SS. The car has 135,000 miles on the odometer. I have a chewed up stock auburn, stock 3:08 gearing in there now. My car is on jackstands at the moment. I’m not planning to get this done over night. This car is parked. This post is continued from an ABS post problem that is seemingly being a bad rear sensor that was chewed up by rear end broken pieces. Note: The car drove fine when I parked it. Still will luckily. But who knows how long. So here is my introduction to my rear end rebuild. Feel free to tell me I’m on/ or not on the right Understanding track, plus picking up and quoting any bold questions I have in my post below. As I feel a need to know these things before I start. I’m still researching. Should be some good information and learning going on here for whoever. Probably going to buy a bearing press and torque meter for pinion preload torque

***Here is my quoted post from my ABS sensor problem turned rear end rebuild


First, I want to thank all of you for helping me on this post.

I’m starting a new post on my rear end rebuild soon. I will attempt to do it myself on my property. I am politely asking furthermore and would appreciate some input from people who know how it’s done while I do the rebuild. I’ve done hours of reading and watching trustful media on how rear ends are rebuilt. I worked as a lead man machinist in the past at a bearing manufacture. I used to finish machine (grind) bearings on all dimensions furthermore size matching raceway diameters to fit certain ball and roller diameter spreads to obtain correct radial play. After reading and watching video’s, I’m having a pretty clear understanding of:
1. Pinion depth
2. Ring gear backlash
3. The relationship of “pinion gear depth” to “position of healthy operational contact point of teeth on pinion and ring gear. (Brushed on yellow stuff)...Where it’s supposed to be
4. Spacing of shims on sides of differential carrier between carrier bearings and case to correct backlash of ring gear to pinion- to FSM spec. Need understanding of how tight the carrier should be between the shims though. No play obviously understood as backlash should not change or shift side to side (left right). I’m guessing the correct backlash and the shims that fit the tightest without exceeding preload is the ticket.
5. Test bearings vs depth guage for setup of pinion gear shim selection.
  • I know the honing of the inner diameter (bore) of the pinion gear bearings makes for a slide fit of the two bearings onto the pinion gear shaft. This all to position pinion depth and “remove bearings easily” if I need pinion depth change by a pinion shim change.
  • I know the pinion depth guage is used to obtain pinion depth without installing the carrier and testing with the gear tooth paint and dis assembling to add or subtract shims to achieve the sweet spot with the paint. (Heel, toe, peak, valley etc. if you will) note: Peak and valley moreso involves carrier spacing shims if pinion depth is correct.
Question: Using a pinion depth guage or not, “is it essential to use a pair of set up bearings (honed I.D)?”

I mean, I am figuring right now that even using a pinion depth guage the end result of pinion depth may need to be corrected and using a non pressed set of bearings will still benefit the builder. Unless there is a way of adding some sort of stack height (shim+ pinion gear width from face seats+ pinion depth to center line of carrier axis. <<<<let me know.

Question: If I purchase an Eaton posi differential or any “non stock” carrier differential, does the pinion depth still match the FSM spec?

Question: if I purchase a non factory gear set, for example a 3:42 or 3:73, does the new pinion gear depth change from the FSM?
I’m guessing that the diameter of the pinion gear itself gets smaller and the ring gear diameter gets larger so YES the pinion depth changes and a number needs to be added or subtracted to the FSM spec along with the number attached to any specific pinion gear. In other words, pinion depth consist of 1. The with of the shim, pinion gear, pinion depth AND the shift of the pinion itself that takes place when a larger carrier diff ring is installed? Is this true?? This is all what I need to know which way to set up my rear end will be better-using a depth guage or not.
*Im guessing using a depth guage would be easier with rebuilding my rear end with an identical auburn and stock size pinion gear and ring gear pair and starting with my old shim.
*Im guessing not using a depth guage would be easier in the sense of not having to add all those numbers up and formulating pinion depth with aftermarket ratio change to the 3:42 or 3:73 (whatever it is if you will). This being if pinion depth changes from the FSM drastically with new ratios. I’m guessing it does since a larger ring would be going in-this resulting in a larger number in the depth reading from the centerline of the carrier.


Finally the reluctor ring gear that interacts with the ABS sensor. I need to know what reluctor ring goes with what “pinion gear and carrier ring set”. And, of the same importance. If the reluctor ring that goes with any particular “pinion gear and carrier ring—set” fits with any chosen carrier differential being an Eaton for example.

End note/s: My vehicle is going to be driven on the street as a regular driver. So, that being said, I hear Eaton differentials are for straight drag type driving and they can have cornering problems and make noise. I’m not saying they are not good parts. I’m saying I don’t want to pay for High performance parts to have my car making rear end noise because I went to Walmart. Further explanation is this. I hear just about everyone wanting a better than stock Auburn or recommending something other than an Auburn like an Eaton, Tru Trac, Locker, Yukon. Whatever it is... It don’t really matter. I may not be naming the correct names. What I’m saying is this. All I want is a reliable rear end with a gear change ratio. And no problems because I put something in my car that has no purpose as a daily tip driving city application. My example was an Eaton. I’ve read they are good but the reason is for the strip. My Auburn is 130k old I’m guessing. I don’t want any Eaton problems after 4 thousand miles because I don’t drag race and want to have an Eaton like everyone else. You see my point. Now if a performance carrier “differential” other than an Auburn is going to last longer than an 3:42 or 3:73 ratio with an new Auburn replacement, let me know and what it is. What I’m asking is this: Is it going to be a mistake rebuilding my rear end with a stock carrier and 3:42 or 3:72 ratio? If like what people say, “3:42 and 3:73 are easier on transmission life” wouldn’t a stock Auburn have a longer life with the gear ratio change also? Let me know.

So what combo of parts should I buy? I know there is a whole bunch of information out there but I’m skeptical about asking questions on post that are so old as people may not respond wasting my time and putting extra stress on me. Although I am utilizing that information, anyone can’t be mad at me For wanting answers to my specific case.

Sorry for the long post. But this is where I needed to start. As of now, my car is jacked up on stands with the wheels removed. I’m just waiting for the right time to remove the rear end. I want to find out what I can put into my rear end and also keep ABS working. Thanks.
 

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I just completed a 3.42 rear. I am going to just state what I needed, and I did, instead of answering questions, because some of the questions are not the right questions.

You need these tools; yoke wrench https://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS/555/81656/10002/-1, magnetic stand and adjustable arm, dial indicator, ft lb torque wrench, in lb torque wrench (dial or pointer style), breaker bar with socket for pinion nut, assorted sockets, micrometer or caliper, 6 ft. long 1 inch diameter steel bar/tube for removing the axle bearings, BFH for removing/installing bearing & races, 2, 2 ft 1/8 in. wall steel tubes to fit the yoke wrench handle, and breaker bar, bearing/seal installation tool (borrow from parts store), pry bar to remove the gear carrier (you can beat it out by with the pinion if you are discarding them), grease paint.


Get the best parts you can afford...premuim grade Richmond gears (there are 2 lines), SKF, or Timkin bearings, Felpro seals, Moser axles, Eaton posi, or Truetrac.

Parts you need; proper bearings for the gear carrier/posi/differential, correct reluctor for the gear ratio, , silicone sealer, axle bearings and seals, pinion bearings, crush sleve, and seal, Gear set with provision for the reluctor, axles, pinion and carrier shims, cover gasket (optional), new studs (optional).

Swap: Remove cover, remove brake backing plates (and ancillary parts), remove pinion nut, remove spider gear shaft, push axles in, and remove C clips (save if good), pull axles out, mark differential bearing caps (they must go back on in the same orientation), remove bearing cap bolts and caps (keep together), remove carrier, remove pinion (use BFH, and steel bar on the shaft inside of the yoke), Measure the seal depths and record. Use BFH, and long steel tube through the housing to tap out the races from both sides, use a shorter steel tube to tap out the pinion bearing races. Clean everything.

install; Grease all bearings and seals lightly. Use tool, and BFH to install axle bearings until they bottom (the sound will change), and axle seals to their original depth. Put the front pinion bearing (greased), crush sleeve and tone ring in the front of the housing in proper sequence (I disconnected my ABS). Install the pinion seal (greased).

I used a 0.038" shim on the pinion (you can use up to a 0.042" according to another post on the forum), and got a beautiful pattern on the ring gear). oil the shaft, and install the pinion bearing. Lightly grease the bearing, and insert into the housing without pushing the pinion seal out. Clean the pinion shaft splines, and put some silicone sealer on the splines (it will leak out of the splines without the silicone). Place the yoke over the pinion shaft, and start the pinion nut (you may get a new nut, but the new one will be larger, and the larger socket will not work as well). Attach the yoke tool to the yoke with the drive shaft bolts, and start tightening the nut. You will need to put the extensions on the yoke tool, and the breaker bar after a couple of turns. I do not suggest using an impact driver at this time. Continue to tighten it until the pinion has no more bearing play. Go a little slow as you near the point of no play. Once you get to that point, you must measure the rotational torque of the pinion shaft. The reading must be between 18 and 30 in lbs for correct preload. Tighten a little at a time (1/8 turn) and check for preload torque. If you go too far, you need a new crush sleeve, and you will have to replace the pinion seal as well as silicone on the pinion splines.

Once you have the pinion installed, install the ring gear on the gear carrier. The bolts are left handed, and need to be torqued to spec. Your gearset will probably have the specs with it. Install the bearing races on the differential/posi/gear carrier. Place the gear carrier with gears in the housing. Install a couple of thick shims on each side. Mic all of your shims, and push the gear carrier to fully engage the gears. Place a few different size shims on the left (same side as the driven gear) until it is fairly snug. Put a few different shims in the other side until it is snug. Attach the magnetic stand with the gauge on the housing, and position the plunger on the tip of one ring gear tooth so it measures in the direction of rotation, without hitting anything. "0" the gauge, and rock the ring gear back and forth while watching the gauge. A good lash will be about 0.009". Adjust the shims while keeping the packs tight until you get the proper lash. At this point, it is easier to pull one of the thick shims out, put the thin shims in, then put the thick one back in. Always measure the thin shims, and keep a record of what your are installing on each side. Once you have the gear lash properly set, and the shim packs are tight, put the grease paint on a couple of teeth, and rotate the gears through one whole revolution of the ring gear. Check the "print" on the teeth, and compare it with the diagrams of proper mesh. If the pinion is a tiny bit high it will not cause any issues, but the pinion shim mentioned above should be excellent. Once you have the lash right, you need to add 0.006" shim on each side. I arranged my shims so that I could replace one of the shims with one that is 0.006 thicker on each side. I had to buy more shims than I liked to find what I needed. I pulled one of the thick shims, and exchanged the two shims, then I had to help the thick shim back in with a small hammer. Keep the thick shims next to each other, and insert the last shim between the housing and another thick shim, so you do not bend the thin shims. I used one of the bearing caps so that I did not have to hit the shim with flat hammer and ding up the edge. There is a tool to install the last shim, but I did not need it. Once you have the shims in, check the lash again to make sure it did not change more than 0.001~0,002". You can always dig the shims out, and adjust them if you recorded what you put in. Now install the bearing caps in their original positions. The rest is pretty much basic reassembly, and if you get the Truetrac, you need an inside circlip pliers. I have extra circlips if you shoot it across the room, and can not find it. Eaton does not sell them separately.

If you are doing this with the rear in the car, you will have to install the carrier bearing caps when checking/adjusting the lash.

If you have any further questions, you now have a basis to ask them.
 

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The friction/clutch posi will eventually wear out. The gear posi (Truetrac) will last for a long time, because it does not have any clutches to wear out. The Eaton clutch posi can be rebuilt, the Auburn can not be rebuilt. Either one will eventually wear out. A truetrac will lock up in a straight line, and will release when going around a corner. I have yet to install the rear in my car, so I am only quoting the manufacturer.

Someone on the forum makes reluctors for 3.42 and 3.73 ratios, but I do not know who it is. You need a computer tune for the different ratio as well.

The aftermarket gearsets require about the same shim as the stock gears, no matter what the ratio is. A shim too far out of range will cause the gears to sing, and if it is too thin, it will also make the gears susceptible to breakage because of insufficient contact surface.

If you are going to play around with pinion shims, make a set of set up bearings. I used a 0.028 shim, and it was too thin. The 0.038 was perfect. You can also try the shim on the original pinion as a starting point, but you must get the bearing off to get it. I do not know if you can get a feeler gauge in between the gear, and the bearing race.

You can get a kit that will allow you to put the shim under the bearing race instead of under the bearing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Someone on the forum makes reluctors for 3.42 and 3.73 ratios, but I do not know who it is. You need a computer tune for the different ratio as well.
*Is the computer re tune for the ABS light to remain off and the odometer to read correctly as well? One or both?
*What happens if I don’t get the tune? Will I have an intermittent ABS light? Will my car run good though? Thanks.
 

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*Is the computer re tune for the ABS light to remain off and the odometer to read correctly as well? One or both?
*What happens if I don’t get the tune? Will I have an intermittent ABS light? Will my car run good though? Thanks.
The correct reluctor will take care of the ABS light, assuming you have no other ABS issues. The tune would take care of the odometer. Been debates on the rest. Logically, the engine and trans doesn't really know or care what it's pushing. You would hit the speed limiter faster since the computer will think you are going faster than you are. There are nuances too. It's been discuss here if you do some searching.
 

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I'm currently in this process and Fred's infor mation has helped me a lot. Heed his advice. I posted some of my work in the Caprice section. https://www.impalassforum.com/threads/what-did-you-do-to-your-caprice-today.275844/page-10 Post #196. I have my rear out and I have bought all the parts. I have a Detroit Tru Trac,( No need for an additive) Moser axles, ARP studs, I bought Summit gears(Reviews were good and I had seen online more than one satisfied user in articles and videos). I also got a Ratech installation kit. This kit has the proper size bearings & races for the Tru Trac. It includes all the bearings, races, seals ring gear bolts & shims. https://www.summitracing.com/parts/rat-10004 It also has the crush sleeve but I got a crush sleeve eliminator.
Get lots of brake cleaner. Wal Mart brand is ok and about a $1 a can less than other store brands. Clean, clean and then clean again. Your rear looks as if it will need lots of cleaning. Taking it out is much easier for that. I also took mine to the car wash and then used a needle scaler to get the built up gunk off. I had a pinion seal seeping and the dirt built up.
You can get a puller for the axle bearings at Auto Zone in Loaner Tools. I bought one for $12 on Amazon. I appears to be the same quality. You need a slide hammer for the puller. I think AZ has that too.
I got a Ratech pinion depth setting tool. https://www.summitracing.com/parts/rat-10004 There are more expensive ones with a dial gauge but I think this will do for me. Just be sure you get the one I posted, if you get this one, because there are different ones for different rears.
Watch as many videos as you can stand. I like these:
There are more but I found these to be most helpful. Be sure to keep the bearing caps in order. I put mine in zip lock bags and marked them. Along with the shims.
I welded up a tool to hold the pinion out of some 1 inch square tube and some flat stock I have here.
While you're at this point be sure to replace the upper control arm bushings.
One last thing for now, and this seems tacky to me, but what the hey. https://www.impalassforum.com/threads/3-42s-for-sale.1317804/#post-12115583 If you go with the 3.42s and need the reluctor. I'm just trying to save you some money. I know what reluctors cost.
Best of luck on this. I had my apprehensions on doing some of the work on my car but I'm learning as I go and I enjoy the time spent on my car.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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I found it easier to just use a long tube to take the axle bearings out of the housing, and it works for the pinion bearing races too.

I tried the Ratec tool, and eventually went with someone else's experience, and that worked out for me with the .038 shim.

It took me three tries to get it right. I hate doing things over, especially the third time.

Check this thread; https://www.impalassforum.com/threads/pretty-gear-pattern.252173/
 

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I found it easier to just use a long tube to take the axle bearings out of the housing, and it works for the pinion bearing races too.

I tried the Ratec tool, and eventually went with someone else's experience, and that worked out for me with the .038 shim.

It took me three tries to get it right. I hate doing things over, especially the third time.

Check this thread; https://www.impalassforum.com/threads/pretty-gear-pattern.252173/
Fred, I was only giving options on removing the axle bearings. What I used worked just fine for me. About 5 pulls on the slide hammer and it was out. I used a punch to remove the pinion races. Putting those back in was a chore though. I had to freeze the races and heat the housing with a propane torch. A little lube and they went a lot easier.

Only three tries? I hope that's all it take me. I'm prepared to do it as much as needed. I don't have anyone here that is experienced in this so I'm on my own. About the Ratech tool. If I have to I will get the more expensive tool with the inserts that sit in the race saddles and dial indicator. But right now I'll try this.

Fred, I appreciate your experience on many things. In this case in a previous post you were made aware of the RTV and very seriously endorsed putting it on the splines since. I would have future trouble had I not done that. I didn't see anything about it in vids or articles I had read.

To sum all this up: helpthe95 and anyone else doing any new, to you, project. Research all you can & collect all your supplies and tools. This includes expendables.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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Don't know if it's in the videos, but for the pressed-on pinion bearing, it's wise to get two identical ones. And hone out one of them slightly so it slides on and off easily. You use it for setting your depth, and then switch to the other one for assembly. Been said you can do that with the old set, but there's no guarantee they would be identical to the new one.
 

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The suggestion for a honed out pinion bearing was already suggested twice.

When installing the pinion races I oiled them, put the install tool on them, and they slid right in with the help of an 8 lb sledge hammer (AKA BFH).
 

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Fred said: When installing the pinion races I oiled them, put the install tool on them, and they slid right in with the help of an 8 lb sledge hammer (AKA BFH).

I guess that was the problem. I was 5 lbs. shy.

91ss said:Don't know if it's in the videos, but for the pressed-on pinion bearing, it's wise to get two identical ones. And hone out one of them slightly so it slides on and off easily. You use it for setting your depth, and then switch to the other one for assembly. Been said you can do that with the old set, but there's no guarantee they would be identical to the new one.

I got lucky. Although I have different brand bearings I put a micrometer on the inner race and they measured the same. The old Timkins became my set-up bearing.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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It is amazing what an 8 lb sledge hammer will do. You can even hold it near the head, and the affect is incredible. I used a 2.5 lb one, and it did not move the races. Three taps with the 8 lb, and it was in.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Pulled my rear end out of the vehicle and disassembled it. The only things left to remove from the case is the two pinion bearing outer races and the axle bearings. I been busy doing a lot of cleaning and more cleaning ahead.

Here are photos of my chewed up ABS reluctor gear that was spinning on the pinion (frozen to the case) because chunks of the rear end and one of my pinion gear teeth (photo of pinion gear and tooth provided) were tossed up into the reluctor gear area doing its thing while jamming it still. I think the reluctor was jammed still towards the end of my driving my car because I could not move it with a stick and mirror the other day when I tried. Who knows how long. The other photos show the chunks lined up. Only the two largest chunks were stuck to the magnet and the rest of everything was up in the reluctor. Also is a photo of the pinion gear seal. I provided it to ask why sealant is on the face of the housing. Is there any “special out of ordinary” reason why it’s applied on the face of the housing? Is it normal for mechanics to put sealant on the seal/case face to ensure the pinion seal is doing its job?
 

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The silicone on the face of the pinion seal is a sign that someone has been there before you (and possibly screwed things up). A little around the metal OD of the seal is normal to help prevent seeps, but it shouldn't squeeze out that much - another indication that the last person who did the work didn't know/care what they were doing. Having encountered a rearend like this myself in the past I have two suggestions.

1) Find a known good used rear end and bolt it in - you'll be way ahead in time and $$ (I think there's one in the classifieds from caddylack maybe?).
2) If you choose not to do #1, completely disassemble the housing and take it to a car wash or use a hot power washer and clean it inside, outside until you think it can't get any cleaner, then do it again. Use hot water and soap. The fine material that's been getting ground up in there is EVERYWHERE and will cause damage to all your new parts unless you get it all cleaned out.

Remember, there's no filter in these so any contamination stays in there and recirculates. I'd suggest a magnetic fill plug (https://goldplug.com/) and another one on the cover too.

Good luck!
 

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I am surprised that the rear was not really noisy.

There should be a magnet on the bottom of the housing. A magnetic plug will only help if you put a cover on it with a drain plug. The fill plug is normally the only access, and it is high on the housing.

I do not think a mechanic did the silicone job. I would say that it was a neophyte shade tree mechanic, The pinion nut was probably retightened improperly, at best.

Remember to put silicone sealer on the pinion splines, or you will be chasing a leak.
 

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Hello. I recently found rear end problems in my (not clone) 1995 Impala SS. The car has 135,000 miles on the odometer. I have a chewed up stock auburn, stock 3:08 gearing in there now. My car is on jackstands at the moment. I’m not planning to get this done over night. This car is parked. This post is continued from an ABS post problem that is seemingly being a bad rear sensor that was chewed up by rear end broken pieces. Note: The car drove fine when I parked it. Still will luckily. But who knows how long. So here is my introduction to my rear end rebuild. Feel free to tell me I’m on/ or not on the right Understanding track, plus picking up and quoting any bold questions I have in my post below. As I feel a need to know these things before I start. I’m still researching. Should be some good information and learning going on here for whoever. Probably going to buy a bearing press and torque meter for pinion preload torque

***Here is my quoted post from my ABS sensor problem turned rear end rebuild


First, I want to thank all of you for helping me on this post.

I’m starting a new post on my rear end rebuild soon. I will attempt to do it myself on my property. I am politely asking furthermore and would appreciate some input from people who know how it’s done while I do the rebuild. I’ve done hours of reading and watching trustful media on how rear ends are rebuilt. I worked as a lead man machinist in the past at a bearing manufacture. I used to finish machine (grind) bearings on all dimensions furthermore size matching raceway diameters to fit certain ball and roller diameter spreads to obtain correct radial play. After reading and watching video’s, I’m having a pretty clear understanding of:
1. Pinion depth
2. Ring gear backlash
3. The relationship of “pinion gear depth” to “position of healthy operational contact point of teeth on pinion and ring gear. (Brushed on yellow stuff)...Where it’s supposed to be
4. Spacing of shims on sides of differential carrier between carrier bearings and case to correct backlash of ring gear to pinion- to FSM spec. Need understanding of how tight the carrier should be between the shims though. No play obviously understood as backlash should not change or shift side to side (left right). I’m guessing the correct backlash and the shims that fit the tightest without exceeding preload is the ticket.
5. Test bearings vs depth guage for setup of pinion gear shim selection.
  • I know the honing of the inner diameter (bore) of the pinion gear bearings makes for a slide fit of the two bearings onto the pinion gear shaft. This all to position pinion depth and “remove bearings easily” if I need pinion depth change by a pinion shim change.
  • I know the pinion depth guage is used to obtain pinion depth without installing the carrier and testing with the gear tooth paint and dis assembling to add or subtract shims to achieve the sweet spot with the paint. (Heel, toe, peak, valley etc. if you will) note: Peak and valley moreso involves carrier spacing shims if pinion depth is correct.
Question: Using a pinion depth guage or not, “is it essential to use a pair of set up bearings (honed I.D)?”

I mean, I am figuring right now that even using a pinion depth guage the end result of pinion depth may need to be corrected and using a non pressed set of bearings will still benefit the builder. Unless there is a way of adding some sort of stack height (shim+ pinion gear width from face seats+ pinion depth to center line of carrier axis. <<<<let me know.

Question: If I purchase an Eaton posi differential or any “non stock” carrier differential, does the pinion depth still match the FSM spec?

Question: if I purchase a non factory gear set, for example a 3:42 or 3:73, does the new pinion gear depth change from the FSM?
I’m guessing that the diameter of the pinion gear itself gets smaller and the ring gear diameter gets larger so YES the pinion depth changes and a number needs to be added or subtracted to the FSM spec along with the number attached to any specific pinion gear. In other words, pinion depth consist of 1. The with of the shim, pinion gear, pinion depth AND the shift of the pinion itself that takes place when a larger carrier diff ring is installed? Is this true?? This is all what I need to know which way to set up my rear end will be better-using a depth guage or not.
*Im guessing using a depth guage would be easier with rebuilding my rear end with an identical auburn and stock size pinion gear and ring gear pair and starting with my old shim.
*Im guessing not using a depth guage would be easier in the sense of not having to add all those numbers up and formulating pinion depth with aftermarket ratio change to the 3:42 or 3:73 (whatever it is if you will). This being if pinion depth changes from the FSM drastically with new ratios. I’m guessing it does since a larger ring would be going in-this resulting in a larger number in the depth reading from the centerline of the carrier.


Finally the reluctor ring gear that interacts with the ABS sensor. I need to know what reluctor ring goes with what “pinion gear and carrier ring set”. And, of the same importance. If the reluctor ring that goes with any particular “pinion gear and carrier ring—set” fits with any chosen carrier differential being an Eaton for example.

End note/s: My vehicle is going to be driven on the street as a regular driver. So, that being said, I hear Eaton differentials are for straight drag type driving and they can have cornering problems and make noise. I’m not saying they are not good parts. I’m saying I don’t want to pay for High performance parts to have my car making rear end noise because I went to Walmart. Further explanation is this. I hear just about everyone wanting a better than stock Auburn or recommending something other than an Auburn like an Eaton, Tru Trac, Locker, Yukon. Whatever it is... It don’t really matter. I may not be naming the correct names. What I’m saying is this. All I want is a reliable rear end with a gear change ratio. And no problems because I put something in my car that has no purpose as a daily tip driving city application. My example was an Eaton. I’ve read they are good but the reason is for the strip. My Auburn is 130k old I’m guessing. I don’t want any Eaton problems after 4 thousand miles because I don’t drag race and want to have an Eaton like everyone else. You see my point. Now if a performance carrier “differential” other than an Auburn is going to last longer than an 3:42 or 3:73 ratio with an new Auburn replacement, let me know and what it is. What I’m asking is this: Is it going to be a mistake rebuilding my rear end with a stock carrier and 3:42 or 3:72 ratio? If like what people say, “3:42 and 3:73 are easier on transmission life” wouldn’t a stock Auburn have a longer life with the gear ratio change also? Let me know.

So what combo of parts should I buy? I know there is a whole bunch of information out there but I’m skeptical about asking questions on post that are so old as people may not respond wasting my time and putting extra stress on me. Although I am utilizing that information, anyone can’t be mad at me For wanting answers to my specific case.

Sorry for the long post. But this is where I needed to start. As of now, my car is jacked up on stands with the wheels removed. I’m just waiting for the right time to remove the rear end. I want to find out what I can put into my rear end and also keep ABS working. Thanks.
 

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I am going to give you the best advise that was given to me years ago. Find someone with lots of experience setting up differentials for high performance cars and watch closely at everything they do. Setting up gears is best done with an expert by your side. Best chance of having success.
 

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As I stated above, If you are good at precision work, you can do this yourself. I did rely on some experts, and one of them steered me incorrectly. For the most part, the builders use the original shim, and work from there. The original shim is 0.036". According to another source, up to 0.042" can be used. Other than that the only adjustment is the lash. Setting the lash is probably the easiest part. If you follow the instructions in the FSM, it will work correctly. Once you have it apart, it should take you about a full day to reassemble it. The easy way out is to have someone do it for you. You will be paying list price for all the parts, and have no personal growth by farming out the work. There is no magic in building a rear, just precision.
 

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As I stated above, If you are good at precision work, you can do this yourself. I did rely on some experts, and one of them steered me incorrectly. For the most part, the builders use the original shim, and work from there. The original shim is 0.036". According to another source, up to 0.042" can be used. Other than that the only adjustment is the lash. Setting the lash is probably the easiest part. If you follow the instructions in the FSM, it will work correctly. Once you have it apart, it should take you about a full day to reassemble it. The easy way out is to have someone do it for you. You will be paying list price for all the parts, and have no personal growth by farming out the work. There is no magic in building a rear, just precision.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
As I stated above, If you are good at precision work, you can do this yourself. I did rely on some experts, and one of them steered me incorrectly. For the most part, the builders use the original shim, and work from there. The original shim is 0.036". According to another source, up to 0.042" can be used. Other than that the only adjustment is the lash. Setting the lash is probably the easiest part. If you follow the instructions in the FSM, it will work correctly. Once you have it apart, it should take you about a full day to reassemble it. The easy way out is to have someone do it for you. You will be paying list price for all the parts, and have no personal growth by farming out the work. There is no magic in building a rear, just precision.
This is a good reply for me to rebound on.

**I have a question about the stock pinion shim. Mine is stamped .036 but it seems like there is maybe .002 or so wear as can be seen as a little lip on the little 3 tabs. The shim reads about .0345. Should I start with a .036 new shim? Wouldn’t a new pinion shim bring my new pinion closest to where it’s supposed to be smearing correctly on the ring? Furthermore, is an aftermarket 3:73 pinion going to set in the same place as a 3:08 with that same shim?
 
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