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Discussion Starter #1
Well the little 9c1 I've been waiting for is finally going to auction.
Here's my dilema; I've bought several new and used cars from dealerships but I have never bought anything from an auction (actually I've never attended an auction before). I was hoping you all could give me some insight and or advice.

I've had the opportunity to already drive the 9C1 while it was still in service. The caprice has <70,xxx miles on her, still relativily young as far as a 9c1 goes.

The maintaince on the car looks good, my wife works for the local municipality so she has access to the records.
It looks like the Felpro gasket was already installed at the dealer "F2003 - RR DIFFER GSKT RPL". So the diff "should" be good but I'll do some PM on it just to be sure.


Thanks in advance and
Cheers

Tracy
 
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Discussion Starter #2
tgeo,

#1 Obtain Wife's permission
#2 Go to http://www.edmunds.com get TRADE IN value price
#3 Bid up to the TRADE IN value price
#4 You are now on your own...

George

[ 08-21-2002: Message edited by: XBOXROX ]
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I wouldn't think edmunds applies to 9C1s since they are not listed and they are municipal cars.???
 
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Discussion Starter #4
After I learned that the professional bidders [car dealers, taxi companies, etc..] go by the "Trade-in Value" and that Edmunds has this info; I figured [just like the professional bidders] that a Caprice was a Caprice 9C1 or not. These bidders use the regular Caprice trade in value minus any costs for repairing listed problems or damage to the cars. Edmunds of course calculates Trade In Value by taking into consideration options, mileage, overall condition which is the same thing... If you can get a car for it's trade in value then you did real good; good luck bidding. George
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Watch carefully that someone is actually bidding against you. This may seem obvious, but if an auctioneer thinks you don;t know what you are doing they will run the price up on you.

Don't be in a rush to make the next bid, that way he won't think your too eager to go higher.

Ive SEEN it happen. :D
 
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Yup, what The Whale said. I always look at it this way: If I ever felt like I way overbid on something, I remember that the guy I outbid was only $50 or $100 from being the idiot that actually bought it, so it must not have been too bad of a deal. If your gut says the price has gone up too high, follow your instinct and let the other guy pay too much. An auction proves the reality that any given object is worth what someone will pay. A book is a guideline, but there are MANY other factors. Are there going to be 25 9C1s, or are there 2 at this auction? You get the idea.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
1) Don't be the first bidder unless the bid is VERY low, like $100 (you could get the car for way less than you ever imagined). I've seen a few newbies be the only bid because they jumped in way too high.

2) KNOW your absolute limit so you're not second guessing yourself during the auction.

3) I don't agree with Whale about bid speed. How fast to bid and the technique you use really varies based on your competition (and they really only matter when your competition is not auction savvy). You need a bunch of auctions under your belt before you should start thinking about stuff like this.

4) Be prepared not to get the car. People that aren't familiar with the car's true value will quite often bid more than the car is worth. Guys with a hard-on for the car will go too high. Lastly, newbies (like yourself) will get caught up in the bidding process and not stop when they should (usual suspect is a woman at her first auction).

Anyway, since this is your first auction, I suggest you just be calm, make sure you are where the auctioneer can easily see you, make bids up to your pre-determined limit and don't get worked up about what the competition might be thinking/doing.

Good luck.

KC
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I agree with all the good info here; I have bought two cars from State auctions one is my Caprice. Look for the folder of all maintenance records on the passenger seat; it will be evident if only one person drove the car from these records. Don't let high mileage scare you away from bidding on a car or low mileage make you think it is a good car. Forget the mileage High or Low and concentrate on those records and the car itself. One broken headlight lens costs $250.00 to replace but bad tires should be expected and plan to buy new tires. A car with higher mileage than most, may just be a jewel in disguise with a near new transmission and engine or the car that was driven by only one person. I don't know electrical stuff; so if the auction inventory list says Item # 324 has electrical problems and I look under the hood and see alternator missing and wires just cut off everywhere, I stay away from the car. Nice factory paint is worth a lot; repaints are not cheap; if they are then they don't shine or last. Water & rust stains in the engine compartment scare me a little; makes me wonder if only the radiator is going soon or will there be a leaking head gasket problem? Don't be afraid of a car that has been wrecked; look at the body work & the records; chances are it has been restored to new condition. If it still has damage; avoid the sucker..! Read the repair records; mine said straightened frame to factory specs, etc, etc... Lastly, options help you choose which car is worth more; more options = more better... Try to go one day early & preview the cars; if one you like says: "Transmission Problems" find out how much it costs to replace the transmission before the auction [this info can be your ace in the hole]..! So far, the only above board auctions I have witnessed are govt, city, county, state, etc... while all the private have been crooked as all hell..! They put their own employees into the stands to make false bids against you and as far as I know it is all legal..! Last two tips: Get near to & listen to the car when they start it up [tailpipe smoke color?] and go in the winter on the worst & coldest, rainiest day because everyone else will be home in bed... Good Luck Bidding... George

EDITS: TRADE-IN VALUE <---- KNOW IT & BID IT

[ 08-21-2002: Message edited by: XBOXROX ]
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Take it from somebody who's been there.

I overbid BIG time. I dropped almost $8k on a 1991 civvie Caprice (LO3) in 1996. The car had no hoses or headlight cells.

I was pre-approved by my bank to $9k, and that was my limit, but the car was worth less than what I paid.


Don't get caught in the moment, let it go once it has passed more than it is really worth. I could have had a better '94, if I had waited, for $5k.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
What I always do when I go to a auction I find some one I know that goes and buys allot of stuff and get them to bid on it for me. When people see a newbie is bidding they will run the crap up so fast. These poeple will pay way more than it is worth just so that you won't get it. I have been there many times, I should have won some things I needed but some Jack Ass ran it up. Also people that are there all the time have other bidders respect and will pass one up when they see who is bidding. Find some one to bid on it for you and give them $100 for getting it for you. It might work out so you don't have to pay sales tax if the guy is a dealer.
Kevin
 
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Discussion Starter #11
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by super10:
When people see a newbie is bidding they will run the crap up so fast. These poeple will pay way more than it is worth just so that you won't get it. I have been there many times, I should have won some things I needed but some Jack Ass ran it up. Also people that are there all the time have other bidders respect and will pass one up when they see who is bidding. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If I know I'm going against a newbie, I'll run it up fast cuz quite often, they get scared and will drop. OTOH, when I'm approaching my limit, I slow way down so they have too much time to overthink the situation which causes them to drop.

To my knowledge, I've never seen someone pay too much just to keep a newbie from getting something. I have definitely seen it when some bozos are being vindictive, but that was always over some perceived slight from a previous auction.

"Jack Ass"s run up auctions all the time but it is because they are mad at you (see above), they are clueless about the real value, they just have to have it, they are caught up in the bidding process or they get caught up in the "I won" mentality. I always say that you should never think about "winning" at an auction. You simply were willing to pay more than anybody else at that moment in time. "Winners" usually overpay.

As for people passing up items because of respect for other bidders, those people must be very easily intimidated or they are hoping for a return favor.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by KC Clark:<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>
3) I don't agree with Whale about bid speed. How fast to bid and the technique you use really varies based on your competition (and they really only matter when your competition is not auction savvy). You need a bunch of auctions under your belt before you should start thinking about stuff like this.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, no this does not apply if you know who the competition is. He said he wasn't real knowledgable of the process and I'm just saying in that case UNLESS you know, take it slow.

If you know the guy two spots down is bidding against you, if you bid real quick he may realize you really want it and drop out rather than run it up.

All comes down to, watch closely what's going on and IMO if your not sure, go slow. IMO.

But as you say, I've never seen someone run a price way up just for the heck of it. Too big of a chance of actaully being the last bid.

The auctioneer is the one that will do this. So his fake bid is the last, big deal. No loss, they just run the car back through later. I'm not sure this is even legal everywhere but I'll gaurantee you it happens.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Whale, after reading this, I went back and re-read your other post. I now realize that I was taking the statement "Don't be in a rush to make the next bid, that way he won't think your too eager to go higher" out of the context of an auctioneer actually bidding. Sorry.

Closest I've knowingly come to seeing something like you described is auction employees obviously bidding on items but I've never seen it at a vehicle auction. I've seen many cars run a few times the same day and I've seen cars run week after week but it was because they never met reserve.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
These last few posts have jogged my memory:

I had visited the state auction enough to know who the car dealers & taxi company bidders where and they probably remembered seeing my ugly face [it is rather hideous, not friendly looking and hard to forget!] They saw me buy the Celebrity there also; so when I was bidding on the Caprice, they definately remembered Mr. Ugly :mad:
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Well dang KC Clark, didn't mean to catch you on your week of the month but yes around here the same car dealers go to the auctions every week. They buy so many cars that even if they do run the bid up and have to buy it they don't give a Sh*t, they will just make it up on another car. So yes they can and do run bids up on new guys to keep them from coming into auctions rather than buying off their lot after the cars are cleaned up and serviced at a higher price.
Kevin
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Tracy,

Before the "big day" try to find another auction somewhere close and check it out. It doesn't have to be a car auction-all auctioneers work basically the same and by watching them work, you should be more comfortable.
 
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I would love to go down to the Rawl's auctions on September 10, where ever it is held, but I will be in School "learning" that Tuesday, sorry KC Clark. I just wish I lived up north where people do things "right", maybe you could start a post spreading your knowledge with the rest of us stupid people.
Kevin
 
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Discussion Starter #18
For a GSA auction its best to take plenty of money because their cars will be many and some very nice. GSA up here in Washington allow you to start but not drive the vehicles during preview [day before auction]. I was looking for a Suburban and found seven candidates but only one worth buying because when started the rest ran like crap and their A/C or radio/stereo systems did not work... Have fun but be careful cuz auctions can be like drugs; don't get hooked... George :D
 
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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by XBOXROX:
For a GSA auction its best to take plenty of money because their cars will be many and some very nice. . ... Have fun but be careful cuz auctions can be like drugs; don't get hooked... George :D<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

For anyone interested in GSA auctions, here is the link:
GSA Fleet Vehicle Sales

Don't go looking for rock bottom deals. Most of the vehicles have a reserve price around wholesale.

If you like Plymouth Breezes, you'll love GSA auctions ;) I think the Feds must have bought every one that Chrysler produced. I'm pretty sure the last GSA I went to had over 40.

As for me getting hooked on car auctions, that feeling passed many moons ago. Now, they just make me feel like I'm going to work. I'll go if a buyer buddy is in town, I need something, I can keep a '94+ B-body away from the taxi crowd or I'm trying to let someone prove their claims ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #20
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR> I have been to 550+ car auctions since '91 <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well hell I guess you are just the man here. If you bought one car at every austion that you have been to then I guess you should just go buy one for Tracy so we can shut up about the whole subject.

Oh yea...
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR> Lastly, maybe I'm wrong on all the above because maybe South Carolina folks have a different way of doing auction business. I doubt it though.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
you started it in the first place. Go back up and right after I posted you started bashing me for no reason, if you have been to that many auctions then you should know how some peoples "pride" can get in the way, maybe it's becasue I am young or a "newby" or something but it has happened to me and others I have asked after you bashed me to see if I was the only one.

And I did say "I should have won some things I needed but some Jack Ass ran it up." yea every one has a price they will go up to and then stop, AKA ran it up.
Kevin
 
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