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1994 Chevrolet Impala SS. Loan my car out. I was told that the serpentine belt broke and kept driving a few miles to get another belt from the auto part store. New serpentine belt was install and now I notice that my car will start to over heat when the car is not moving. When the car starts to move the temperature will drop. Any chance the the water pump got damage or air got in the system? There's a lot of air that builds up and I release from the bleeder valve that's on top of the thermostat. Thanks in advance.
 

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If you continually have to release air from the cooling system, you may have a blown head gasket due to the car being driven "a few miles" to get a new belt.
 

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If you continually have to release air from the cooling system, you may have a blown head gasket due to the car being driven "a few
miles" to get a new belt.
Thanks for your reply. To check for a blown head gasket do I remove the coolant reservoir cap, crank the and check for air bubbles or is there other ways?
 

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OP,
I flinched twice so keep an open mind. First, it's tough as hell getting an LT- to blow a head gasket. Second, the statistical probability of having the serpentine break coincidentally at exactly the point of just someone else driving is lower than being struck by lightning while buying the winning lottery ticket.

Sure, add a blown gasket to the list, but recommend a 'properly correct' antifreeze mix - fill - burp to assure baseline.
Search for the full drill, but Cliffs:
Raised front
Dist. H2O and 2 1/2 gal. AF
New thermostat (always when overheating suspected)
Cap off. Get up to temp.
Cap on at point of boilover.
Burp
Leave sealed and don't touch until completely cooled
Refill reserv.
Repeat
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OP,
I flinched twice so keep an open mind. First, it's tough as hell getting an LT- to blow a head gasket. Second, the statistical probability of having the serpentine break coincidentally at exactly the point of just someone else driving is lower than being struck by lightning while buying the winning lottery ticket.

Sure, add a blown gasket to the list, but recommend a 'properly correct' antifreeze mix - fill - burp to assure baseline.
Search for the full drill, but Cliffs:
Raised front
Dist. H2O and 2 1/2 gal. AF
New thermostat (always when overheating suspected)
Cap off. Get up to temp.
Cap on at point of boilover.
Burp
Leave sealed and don't touch until completely cooled
Refill reserv.
Repeat
Thank you for your reply. I'm going to check the oil fill cap for milky residue. Then right after I'm definitely going to change the thermostat.
 

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1994 Chevrolet Impala SS. Loan my car out. I was told that the serpentine belt broke and kept driving a few miles to get another belt from the auto part store. New serpentine belt was install and now I notice that my car will start to over heat when the car is not moving. When the car starts to move the temperature will drop. Any chance the the water pump got damage or air got in the system? There's a lot of air that builds up and I release from the bleeder valve that's on top of the thermostat. Thanks in advance.
1994 Chevrolet Impala SS. Loan my car out. I was told that the serpentine belt broke and kept driving a few miles to get another belt from the auto part store. New serpentine belt was install and now I notice that my car will start to over heat when the car is not moving. When the car starts to move the temperature will drop. Any chance the the water pump got damage or air got in the system? There's a lot of air that builds up and I release from the bleeder valve that's on top of the thermostat. Thanks in advance.
The serpentine belt does not affect cooling. The water pump is cam driven and cooling fans are electric. So driving "a few miles" without a belt would not make it overheat. Without the belt you have no A/C, no alternator, so your running on the battery, and it will be a bear to steer.
Overheating while sitting but ok while moving suggests an airflow problem. Confirm that the radiator fans turn on when they're supposed to.
The coolant is in a closed system. Continually having air in the system suggests a blown head gasket or a leak. A leak is much more likely. Throw a big piece of cardboard under the car the next time you park for the night. That will help you know where to look.

And don't let that guy borrow your car again~
 

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Confirm that the radiator fans turn on when they're supposed to.
(According to GM, the fans are SUPPOSED to be on by 225°F (primary passenger side) & 232°F.
For the record, most of the older members of the ISSF know better than to settle for this.)

Besides GM's very late B-car fan-on thresholds, spin the fans by hand, if you feel more than the slightest resistance, you may need to replace the fan motors.

Check the fan relays in the underhood fusebox. If either the fusebox, or either of the fan relays look melty, you need Gary's fan relocation harness.
 
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