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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I liked mine in the old car...I wouldn't bother with them UNTIL the car is due for new tie rods, but then I would go for it...I'm planning that for this car maybe mid-summer, front end is fine now, but it won't be in 10K miles.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Depends on whether you adjust them yourself or not. They make adjustments way way easier, but if you leave it to the Goobers at the alignment shop, it shouldn't make any difference to you. GM used those split sleeves forever and they worked OK. They're just a pain in the butt to get all lined up right, with 2 pinch bolts to each sleeve. But I do my own, and think of the Hotchkis sleeves as critical.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've heard stories about Hotchkis sleeves rusting solid and having to replace inner and outer tie rods and sleeves because of it, jsut to do an alignment. Just can't remember where I read it. Probably here over the past few years but I don't know where.

SStewart
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Originally posted by Murf'sDad:
I've heard stories about Hotchkis sleeves rusting solid and having to replace inner and outer tie rods and sleeves because of it, jsut to do an alignment. Just can't remember where I read it. Probably here over the past few years but I don't know where.

SStewart
I don't remember that one. Makes me want to go check mine now. I do remember a post debating the issue of the flexibility of the stock ones vs. the solidness of the hotchkis in an accident or some situation where sacrificing the stock ones may be beneficial to save the other components. The hotchkis also will not work with one of the aftermarket tie rods out there, I think PPT (or at least they used to not fit.)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The hotchkis also will not work with one of the aftermarket tie rods out there, I think PPT (or at least they used to not fit.)
If they work on the stock parts they should also work on all aftermarket "stock replacement" parts. The key is that our tie rods are an 11/16 thread size... most of the older muscle car stuff was 5/8's (IIRC)
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Originally posted by maesstro:
Originally posted by Murf'sDad:
[qb] I've heard stories about Hotchkis sleeves rusting solid and having to replace inner and outer tie rods and sleeves because of it, jsut to do an alignment. Just can't remember where I read it. Probably here over the past few years but I don't know where.

SStewart
I guess whoever had the hotchkis sleeves rust solid never heard of a handy little product called Anti-Seize...
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Originally posted by Rustic:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr /> The hotchkis also will not work with one of the aftermarket tie rods out there, I think PPT (or at least they used to not fit.)
If they work on the stock parts they should also work on all aftermarket "stock replacement" parts. The key is that our tie rods are an 11/16 thread size... most of the older muscle car stuff was 5/8's (IIRC) </font>[/QUOTE]That was the problem. The aftermarket ones were larger, but I think they were working on their own sleeve.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nope...that wasn't the problem.

In theory, the PPM parts are the same thread size. The issue is that they threads are cut slightly differently.

Net result : the Hotchkis (or GW) adjusters WILL thread on just fine, but will NOT ever get tight. The tie rod assembly (inner tierod, adjuster, outer tierod) will "wiggle" with the adjuster fully tightened. Obviously, this is NOT a situation you'd want on the car...

With the PPM parts, stock adjusters will work since they "clamp down" on the tierod instead of depending on the threading to tighten up to the tierod. Downside is that the stock adjusters have some (slight) flex built into them. Thus why you'd go with the solid adjusters in the first place ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Originally posted by wheelz:
I guess whoever had the hotchkis sleeves rust solid never heard of a handy little product called Anti-Seize...
Anti-seize wasn't the fix. IIRC the car was driven in the snow belt and, like anything else steel when it is hit by salt, it rusted. The sleeve rusted to the TR ends and the lock nuts rusted to the body and the TR threads. Total mess.

SSTewart
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Originally posted by Murf'sDad:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by wheelz:
I guess whoever had the hotchkis sleeves rust solid never heard of a handy little product called Anti-Seize...
Anti-seize wasn't the fix. IIRC the car was driven in the snow belt and, like anything else steel when it is hit by salt, it rusted. The sleeve rusted to the TR ends and the lock nuts rusted to the body and the TR threads. Total mess.

SSTewart
</font>[/QUOTE]Then use ARP moly lube. My car see's the rust belt and snow all the time. I use it on my wheel studs and they never corrode anymore. That stuff is awesome, and well worth the price to get the big tub of it with a brush and put it on every fastener that you can (that doesn't spec another specific thread locker or sealant)...it does change how much you should torque to, but it's also awesome about preventing corrosion and keeping threads solid.
 
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