Chevy Impala SS Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do tires go bad after a certain time? Can I store some tires for 2-3 yrs and not have to worry about anything? :confused:

Thanks.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Originally posted by MexSS:
....Can I store some tires for 2-3 yrs and not have to worry about anything?....
No reason why not. You've had tires on a car for 2-3 years......right ;) ?

Anyway, if at all possible keep them indoors....in a temperature controlled setting.

KW
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Also, keep away from ozone sources (namely, electric motors) and try to keep sunlight/UV off of them.

Under those conditions, 2-3 years shouldn't be a problem. Much over 5-6 and it's probably approaching dry-rot time...
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just as an FYI...there is a manufacturers date code on all tires. It is usually found on the inside sidewall if the tires are directional or white lettered, but sometimes I've seen it on the outside. It always follows the "DOT" stamp. It will be 4 digits: the first two are the week and the second two are the year. ie: 2802 is week 28 of 2002. As Ed says and many tire companies have confirmed, after 6-7 years you start to get dry rot that might not be visible. When I'm buying used tires and wheels I always check out the date code. I've had a couple of really nice looking tires blow out for no apparent reason except for age.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Most of the autocrossers that I know recommend storing your tires in a sealed plastics garbage bag. That protects them from sun and ozone. You can store tires for a long time if you bag them.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have friends running 40 to 50 year old bias ply tires on their hot rods. Personally, I'm running 2 of my vehicles with tires over 10 years old. As long as the sidewall's not starting to crack or split, I run'em, and I've never had a failure. I wouldn't trust them at very high speeds(over 90), and I almost never hear of an age related failure. I've also heard that you can help restore older tires by covering them in VHT tire compound and wrapping them in garbage bags(it helps condition and soften the rubber).
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok so what if you alrady have some cracking on the sidewall...what can I do to stop this from progressing?
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What KW said. if the sidewalls already starting to crack, theres really nothing you can do about it. The VHT will probably slow it down some, but thats about it. However, depending on how bad they are, you could still run'em. I've run cracked sidewalls before for many many miles, and have never had a failure. That doesn't mean you won't though. I've never used them in a car as heave as a B-body. Guess what I'm saying is how lucky do you feel?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top