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I noticed yesterday I lost a speed on my ac blower motor it is the speed higher than the lowest...
I took the blower motor out and the resistor assy all down in that area.

blower motor and all connections looked perfect.. on inspecting the resistor assy I noticed the resistor connections had rusted.. but still was connected solid... I cleaned up the rust and put some solder on that connection put it all back and got all my speeds back..

rock auto has the resistor assy $21 delivered ac delco OEM..

next week I will install it .. I was surprised GM used a metal that would rust on the resistors .... resistors looked new ...put a drop of oil on the blower and my rat wire looks great .. keeps out critters and no debris in the fan ..
 

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The blower resistor was the first fix I had to do on my Caprice.

The resistor metal is hard to solder and crimping is cheap. Most blower resistors I have replaced have had serviceable resistors that have broken at the bottom due to rust. On some cars the quick connector get loose and melt the connector shell before disconnection. The blower plugs and the resistor plugs a place I add non conducting silicon (like in the spark plugs). Any corrosion in these plugs results in melt downs because of the high current.

J Cat Could you please take some pictures of your screen when you put the new resistor in.
 

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For those of you who have not had this fun have a look at the pictures.

Resistor module with rust. Nickle-Chrome resistors perfect.

The thermal fuse on the module. If the blower is blocked this fuse will blow to prevent the resistors starting a fire. The resistors need air flow to be safe. Do not test the module with the blower out for too long. Same part as in coffee makers.
 

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Coating the bottom of the leads up to the resistors with RTV, or liquid insulation should keep the water away. The water comes from the evaporator core. The positioning of the resistor pack is at best poor. You would thing an engineer would put it above the high water mark.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Coating the bottom of the leads up to the resistors with RTV, or liquid insulation should keep the water away. The water comes from the evaporator core. The positioning of the resistor pack is at best poor. You would thing an engineer would put it above the high water mark.
well after 21 years I have to say , up here in rust belt not all that unhappy that the resistor module did rust out ..perhaps the new one will last another 21 years ... I may not ... I was gonna put some high temp paint on the resistor crimp steel area .. 1500 F paint seems to hold up pretty good on some exhaust manifolds I did..

on the picture of the rat wire well I would have to drop the blower motor .. that is a PITA since I would also have to disconnect a few connectors... the blower removed you will see a hole that is how the air comes in placing some 1/4 inch galv steel wire over that hole and I used some dow 795 sealant and a couple of screws/washers to hold in place. not very pretty but it did keep the blower from the pollen crap and pine needles also no rodent entry very happy with that..

that motor is very quiet for its age... my 2016 toyota makes more noise.
 

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"that motor is very quiet for its age... my 2016 toyota makes more noise."

Agreed, and very powerful. Do anything you can to maintain your original - they are better than replacements. Years ago, mine developed a noise. Took it out, cleaned and oiled it. It's been fine ever since.

Bearings are said to be sealed, well................

I put a few drops of oil on the shaft/bearing point and left it one day. Then inverted it from normal installed position, oiled the other bearing and let it sit.

One reason I keep this car is the HVAC - better than any newer car.

On a 100 degree day, I can get 38F measured at the vent. That + a great fan = happiness.
 

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"that motor is very quiet for its age... my 2016 toyota makes more noise."

Agreed, and very powerful. Do anything you can to maintain your original - they are better than replacements. Years ago, mine developed a noise. Took it out, cleaned and oiled it. It's been fine ever since.

Bearings are said to be sealed, well................

I put a few drops of oil on the shaft/bearing point and left it one day. Then inverted it from normal installed position, oiled the other bearing and let it sit.
Very good idea. The thought I had in addition to this would be to use gear oil, because of the viscosity, it may be a little longer lasting.

One reason I keep this car is the HVAC - better than any newer car.

On a 100 degree day, I can get 38F measured at the vent. That + a great fan = happiness.
Agreed! We've got some excellently designed A/C systems! Right now we've got Texas' wonderful summer heat of 100°+ each day for the next 45 days or so. I had my thermometer installed in the vent right after getting everything working again, and snapped this picture after work in the peak of the heat for the day.



I couldn't be happier, I just wish the speed of the motor between it's MAX setting, and the next (III) setting was a little closer. III still gets the job done, but it could be a little faster.
 
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