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Discussion Starter #1
We're continuing to have electrical and mechanical problems with the 220K mile old original seat in this 94 FWB. I found a 96 FWB in the junkyard that appeared to be well taken care of and only had 70K on the clock prior to getting hit in the back and totaled.



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I took the driver's seat from the car before someone else could take it; the seat foam seems to be in excellent shape and mechanically it seems to be almost equally good. However, this 94 has a blue interior and the 96 had a gray one. Additionally, the 94 has the three zone lumbar adjustment where this 96 has single zone.



1. Is it possible to swap over the leather cover from the 94 seat to the 96 seat despite the difference in control panels and lumbar systems?

2. If it is possible, what materials and tools would I need?

3. Is the 96 seat electrically compatible with the 94 directly? Would it make more sense to pull the 94 seat apart and swap all the contents onto the 96 frame except the bad foam?



Thanks.
 

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The frames should be the same. You need a curved tool to slide down the headrest mounting tubes, to release the retaining tangs. Other than that, most of the tools are common wrenches, and screw drivers. You will have to check the circuits for the lumbar supports. The switches on the donor seat are probably different in number or type. If you swap your foam, and cover to the 96 frame, you can probably keep the lumbar parts and switches from your seat.

There are probably a couple of strips that hold the seams in place on the foam, I am not sure how they attach, but could be Velcro. Generally the seat skin perimeters are held in place by strips that fit over the frame.

The seats are generally identical, but you may have different connectors.

When you take the 96 seat apart, and compare it with your original seat, most of it will become self evident.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What sort of curved tool does one need to release the headrest? That is of special interest because the 94 headrest rotation position ratchet system no longer holds its position and it's really irritating no matter what we do with these seats.
 

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The tool should be about 4 inches long and have a handle. The 4 inch working part of the tool should be curved to match the rods that hold the headrest, and wrap around it about half way. The handle should act as a stop when inserting the tool, and allow you to retrieve the tool after removing the headrest.

If you lift the headrest to its top position, place the tool around the rod then push the tool, and headrest back in, the tool will push the tang out of the way. Keep the tool fully inserted, and pull up on the headrest. Making 2 of the tools allows you to completely remove the headrest. Thin aluminum or steel works best.

There are a series of detents on the rods that hold the headrest, and the tang keeps it in the selected position. If the tang, or the detents are damaged, it may allow the headrest to move randomly.
 

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There may be a few hog rings, but the sewn on nylon strips have replaced most or all of them.
 

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You can easily swap the covers on the headrests.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The tool should be about 4 inches long and have a handle. The 4 inch working part of the tool should be curved to match the rods that hold the headrest, and wrap around it about half way. The handle should act as a stop when inserting the tool, and allow you to retrieve the tool after removing the headrest.

If you lift the headrest to its top position, place the tool around the rod then push the tool, and headrest back in, the tool will push the tang out of the way. Keep the tool fully inserted, and pull up on the headrest. Making 2 of the tools allows you to completely remove the headrest. Thin aluminum or steel works best.

There are a series of detents on the rods that hold the headrest, and the tang keeps it in the selected position. If the tang, or the detents are damaged, it may allow the headrest to move randomly.

Is there a post or plans somewhere on how to make this tool? Or is it maybe available commercially?
 

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I do not know of any plans. The FSM does not even have any reference, nor is one made. If you think about it a little, you should be able to make a couple. You could try an auto upholstery shop. Just do not yank them to remove them, because it will break/damage the tang.
 

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The earlier seats had the switches on the seat and the later ones mostly on the door panels. And the harnesses are different. But the mechanisms and their plugs are the same. So you can take the harness from one seat to the other if need be. But if swapping covers you will probably end up with switches where that lumbar support panel is. And have to cut holes for your other switches that are on your seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The earlier seats had the switches on the seat and the later ones mostly on the door panels. And the harnesses are different. But the mechanisms and their plugs are the same. So you can take the harness from one seat to the other if need be. But if swapping covers you will probably end up with switches where that lumbar support panel is. And have to cut holes for your other switches that are on your seat.

These 94 and 96 seats have the same pod with switches on the side of the seat - the only difference is the switch count and the provision for the switches. The 96's switch pod is visible in the pictures I posted above, this is what the 94's looks like (not the actual one on the car as it's not here - only difference is the color.)



 

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These 94 and 96 seats have the same pod with switches on the side of the seat - the only difference is the switch count and the provision for the switches. The 96's switch pod is visible in the pictures I posted above, this is what the 94's looks like (not the actual one on the car as it's not here - only difference is the color.)




Yes but doesn't your 94 seat have switches on the side of the seat for moving it beside the lumbar controls?
 

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You are going to have to fight with it a little, and get back to us. Planning can only get you so far, get your tools out, and start taking the cover off.

BTW, you did not state exactly what the symptoms are for your original seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes but doesn't your 94 seat have switches on the side of the seat for moving it beside the lumbar controls?

Negative, they are on the door panel.



You are going to have to fight with it a little, and get back to us. Planning can only get you so far, get your tools out, and start taking the cover off.

BTW, you did not state exactly what the symptoms are for your original seat.

It keeps popping the pivot pins out of the front, the foam cushions are flat and it now feels suspiciously like sitting on a police booking bench, the heating grid has ceased to work though we have verified power is being sent to the grid and the motors are rather weak even with nobody in the seat. This replacement seat, when it appeared, appeared to be a good answer to all of these.
 

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I think they all had the seat controls in the door panel. The heat, recline, and lumbar were always on the seat.

The heater grid can be repaired with regular wire crimps, or a small metal tube (crimp without the insulation) crimped over the broken ends.

The seats in a Roadmaster Limited are basically the same seat as the FW seat.
 

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Is there a post or plans somewhere on how to make this tool? Or is it maybe available commercially?


I do not know of any plans. The FSM does not even have any reference, nor is one made. If you think about it a little, you should be able to make a couple. You could try an auto upholstery shop. Just do not yank them to remove them, because it will break/damage the tang.
I checked My 94 FSM (Caprice) 10-10-16 Head Restraint Assembly had a diagram for the tool.
The seats and carpet section has many diagrams of the seats.
 
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