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I need to rotate my tires, but the lugnuts on the front pass. side are too tight, and if I try to put any more force on them I am afraid that I will break off the studs. Any tricks to loosen them up? :confused:

Thanks for any help
 
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Come on... Surely someone can tell me how to loosen those things... :confused:
 
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soak them in liquid wrench...wait 30 min...put a 3 ft pipe on the end of the wrench....when you get them off clean all the oil off the studs and nuts with carb cleaner..... I doubt you will ever break the stud....
 
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And if you DO break a stud : they are pretty easy to replace. Basically bang them out from the front, and install new ones from the back. I THINK that you won't even have to remove the rotor from the car.

Lugnut studs are cheap too : the "better" GM ones (that Bill Harper has posted about) are only about $2 each thru Dal. The longer ARP studs that I'm running in back now are $12 per "card" of 5 studs via Summit Racing, and they are quite a bit beefier than the stock studs.
 
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Thanks, I'll give it a try.


I was a little scared about breaking the stud, but that doesn't seem like a big deal. Thanks!
 
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Scott,

The question is why they are so tight.

It could be corrosion, but you want to be careful about overdoing any lubricant or anti-seize. GM specs for torque are 100 lb/ft for the 12mm stud in all applications and wheel types.

Could the studs have been overtightened? It may be that in your part of the country, there is a corrosion situation to deal with. The plan might be to periodically loosen and retighten the lug nuts between wheel removal or rotation to make sure that any corrosion action is disrupted before it welds the parts together.

As Ed says, if you do snap a stud, it's not the end of the world. If the studs are too tight, it can also deform the rotor hub and contribute to warpage and a pulsing brake pedal.

The factory service manual says the lug nuts are to be installed "dry"--use NO lubricant. If you do find corrosion on the wheel studs, you should clean them thoroughly with a wire brush. I believe it would be "OK" to use a VERY small amount of lube on the studs, run the lug nuts on so everything gets some degree of relief from any corrosion, and then the great majority of the lubricant should be cleaned off before reinstalling the wheel.

Another thing you should consider, if the studs are OK, is to thoroughly inspect the lug nuts, and replace them if necessary. I think this probably does not happen enough, personally, and I've seen quite a few lug nuts that I considered to be "worn out" and worthy of tossing for new hardware.

Per the FSM, here is a quote:

Under "WHEEL REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION" Section 3E, (96 FSM)

CAUTION: Never use oil or grease on wheel bolts or wheel nuts. Tighten the wheel nuts with your fingers until they are snug. Then tighten the wheel nuts (in a 5-point star pattern) to the specified torque.

<snip>

I know this is all somewhat redundant/repetitive, and many here on the Forum have been doing just the opposite of what I've stated here, and had no problems. I'm only passing along what I am able to find to help you resolve your problem.

Let us know how this turns out!
 
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Thanks, Bill. I won't have time until Friday to try and get the wheel off. It is just the one wheel, not all four... My guess is that the nuts are just overtightened. I'll let you know if I encounter any other problems.
Thanks
 

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Neversieze the **** out of them and a 100 lbs torque,been doing it my whole life and never had a problem,no lubricant my ass,more lawyer talk cause some idiot didn't tighten up some lug nuts at a stealership
 

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Neversieze the **** out of them and a 100 lbs torque,been doing it my whole life and never had a problem,no lubricant my ass,more lawyer talk cause some idiot didn't tighten up some lug nuts at a stealership
Yes, that is an impressive necro-post.
First off, torque specs are measured clean and dry. It will be darned difficult coming across general torquing directions saying, "Apply lubrication before torquing." Lubed fasteners torqued to 100# consistently end up tighter than 100#. The worst place to apply lube is the bearing area between wheel and nut.

Next, denigrating banter about attorneys, mechanics and dealerships is sometimes merited, but entirely misplaced for this topic. The very first hit searching the sugject brought up written guidelines by one prominent manufacturer for using their product. And they don't work for any stealerships:

As NL posted so many years ago, some folks swear by lubeing or anti-seize for their lugs and they ain't dead. But that's hardly a valid engineering specification, and It's likely as much for anti-corrosion as anything else. The wisest guideline is that nothing should ever touch a lug except its nut and a wire brush.

Finally, the only value in this case for exhuming this thread MIGHT be to remind everyone just to remember to rotate their tires periodically for its own sake, and to do it themselves to protect against 250# mech shop airguns. Then they can just inspect and clean the lugs and eliminate the need for aimless Hatfield & McCoy debate about what to put on lug nuts.

I always make a grand flurry of activity for my wife by loosening/retightening ALL her tires whenever she's been to a shop. 98% of the time it's just for inspections where they're going to %#ck with at least one wheel. It gains me valuable points, and gives her the confidence of knowing she can at least change a flat if she can't wait for AAA.
 

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I always make a grand flurry of activity for my wife by loosening/retightening ALL her tires whenever she's been to a shop. 98% of the time it's just for inspections where they're going to %#ck with at least one wheel. It gains me valuable points, and gives her the confidence of knowing she can at least change a flat if she can't wait for AAA.
I take off wheel covers before sending the car in. Then there is no BS about the cover was damaged when they had it or misinstalled and lost it. It is worth the time to remove and retorque the wheels a week before a major road trip. It is much easier to deal with issues in your driveway instead of road side.

People may want to think about putting stuff on wheel studs. I my area it is specifically listed in the highway act. So I can fail a inspection, get a ticket if it is found during a accident investigation, and as a law I would be open to a lawsuit that I could not defend . The vehicle manufacturer, the product manufacturer, and the government say no. So do what is best right?
 

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Interesting intel, and clearly a not "but muh freedums" approach your highway act is. But I can just picture the "failure mode" by combining lubed lugs especially with industrial strength shop airguns. Made even more spectacular when at interstate speeds. Of course that's worst case scenario, but prudent ALWAYS to plan and anticipate them.
 
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just for fun,,,,,

I mounted a hub and studs along with 60 taper seats to mimic wheels in the vice .
Note: these are 1/2 studs because I didn't have 12mm on hand so a little tougher than ours

One stud , nut, taper clean, dry
One stud, nut ,taper, slathered in neverseize

Snugged both to 15lbs to seat .

Torqued dry to 100 pounds, it turned 90 degrees

Tried to break it but give up at 200 pounds
At 200 pounds the nut had turned another 180 degrees

The lubed one
Torqued to 100 pounds , it turned 210 degrees !
Tried to over torque , it plateaued at 140 pounds, the nut just kept turning.
The stud just started stretching .


The morel ?
with a 12mm stud ,if you slather the hardware , at 100 pounds you will be getting pretty close if not over yield

If one feels the need, you might want the determine how many degrees your hardware turns clean and dry at spec and only tighten about the same angle lubed.

Maybe next time I will try and put my rod stretch gauge on a wheel stud and get some numbers
20201016_131318.jpg
20201016_131359.jpg
 

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^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Damn. Just damn.
 

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Just imagine me doing this at work on a class 8 that has lugs that torque to a few hundred foot pounds. Slather up a hub that requires 600?

Neverseize as a lube, lol. Some manufacturers require it for the exhaust manifold bolts but that's about it. Cummins ISX15 main bearings that require 110 pounds PLUS 180 degrees use plain old 15W-40 motor oil. The old Detroit Diesel engines used International Compound Number 2 on the cylinder head.
 
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