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Origional Write up on this one from Scott Mueller:

I think that the perfect steering wheel for the Impala is the Leather
4-spoke wheel with redundant Steering Wheel Controls (SWC) for the
audio unit that comes optional on the '96 and later Monte Carlo! It
is thicker than the Impala wheel and has finger grips on top as well
as grip areas on the sides. It is perfectly shaped and proportioned
so as not to interfere with reading the instrument cluster, and the
feel in the grip areas is so much better than the Impala wheel.
There are 8 buttons on the wheel. On the left side is a large rocker
button which is labeled "Seek", and which goes up or down. There are
also smaller "Preset" and "AM/FM" buttons below the "Seek" rocker
button. On the RH side there is a larger "Volume" rocker button,
which goes up or down, as well as smaller "Play" and "Mute" buttons
just below.
Besides being able to change stations or CD/Tape programs without taking
your hands off of the wheel, the SWCs feature an item that is not
even on the radio itself, a MUTE button! This is one of the best
features of this mod, now when somebody is talking, or I pull up to a
toll booth, I can just move my thumb and hit the mute button without
taking my hands off of the wheel. Another touch and the previously
selected volume level is restored.
There have been two different types of Steering Wheel Control (SWC)
systems in GM vehicles. The first was an optical system that was used
mostly on vehicles without airbags. This system used an optical
coupling ring in the steering column and sent data to the radio. The
newer system is Analog in nature and uses the SIR (Supplemental
Inflatable Restraint = Air Bag) coil in the column to additionally
pass a voltage to the radio. In each system the connection to the
radio was only a single wire.
The analog steering wheel controls in the Monte Carlo wheel interface
perfectly with the '95-'96 Impala radios, and the wheel is black
leather which looks much better than the stock gray wheel (plus it
does not show dirt as readily). The horn works better than the
'94-'95 style horn setup, and just about as good as the new membrane
type dual bugle '96 setup, and the air bag has a Chevy logo of
course. <g>
This wheel is a direct bolt-in, all that is required is an F-car SIR
coil, which has the extra wires for the radio controls. The radio
controls are also backlit, which looks really cool at night. I have
had this wheel installed in my Impala for quite some time now and I
love it.
Since the wheel is black leather, I painted the steering column satin
black to match. Note that many GM vehicles come with dark colored
steering columns, even though the rest of the interior may be a
lighter color.
I can say that the controls work beautifully, and ever since I first
experienced them in my '89 Trans Am, I have been a big fan of radio
controls on the steering wheel.
Here are the relevant part numbers:
P/N Item List Net
----------------------------------------------------------
16759678* Steering Wheel w/radio controls $408.67 $266.11
16756546 SIR Module (Air Bag) $723.60 $471.19
26050811 SIR Coil $168.56 $109.76
----------------------------------------------------------
Total $1,300.83 $847.06
* superceded by p/n 16821632
The only problem with this mod is the cost. If you have to purchase
these parts new, it will run you about $850. A junkyard may be a
source for the wheel and airbag, which were used in '96 and up Monte
Carlos with the deluxe interior.
A few years ago I was able to get the new wheel and bag for FREE from
my dealer under the infamous "tilt and toot" TSB (53-32-05). This TSB
calls for the '94 and '95 "single bugle" airbag and wheel setup to be
replaced with a new "double bugle" version which has improved horn
operation via a membrane horn switch. For some strange reason, my
dealer somehow made a mistake and instead of the '96 Impala wheel and
airbag, I *accidentally* got a '96 Monte Carlo wheel and airbag. <g>
Unfortunately this only applies to '94 and '95 Caprice/Impalas, and
you obviously must have a shall we say cooperative dealer or you will
have to buy these parts yourself. Since my '95 Caprice came with the
double bugle airbag/horn, it was ineligible for this TSB, and I had
to purchase the wheel and airbag for that vehicle.
You need to replace the stock SIR coil with an F-car SIR coil to be
compatible with the new wheel, as it connects the wheel radio
controls down through the steering column, where it ends in a 4-pin
connector. The radio connector uses Micro-Pack 100 terminals, and the
SIR coil connector uses Metri-Pack 150 terminals.
In my case the easiest solution was to cannibalize a used wiring
harness out of a '95 Trans Am to get the appropriate connectors for
this and several other mods I made around the same time, which was a
big help. With this donor harness I was able to use all of the
correct factory mating connectors and even the correct gauge and
color wires.
Bolting on the wheel itself on is very straight forward, it goes on
exactly like the stock wheel. To wire up the radio controls you will
have to connect the wires in the 4-pin connector at the end of the
coil harness to:
Pin Color Function
-------------------------------------------
A Yellow Hot in ACC/RUN 12v source
B Grey Dimmer circuit (illuminated controls)
C Lt. Green Strng whl ctrl (C3 pin 14) on radio
D Black/White Ground
Note that a single wire runs to the back of the radio connector C3
pin 14 from terminal C on the SIR coil connector. All '95 and up
B-car radios support this feature.
The '95-'96 Impala radios have the analog SWC feature built-in, all that
is needed is to connect the switches to the SWC terminal on the radio
for it to work. The switches work by connecting a pull-up resistance
value between a voltage source and the SWC terminal on the radio. By
reading the voltage present on the SWC terminal the radio can be made
to change stations, volume, etc. The switches and resistance values
are as follows:
Switch Function Resistance
-------------------------------
SW1 RH Volume UP 1270 ohms
SW2 RH Volume DOWN 294 ohms
SW3 RH Play 348 ohms
SW4 RH Mute 475 ohms
SW5 LH Seek UP 715 ohms
SW6 LH Seek DOWN 1180 ohms
SW7 LH AM/FM 2370 ohms
SW8 LH Preset 6980 ohms
Using this information one could build a remote control switch for
placement elsewhere in the car, such as in the trunk. All of the 8
switches should be wired in parallel with each other, such that when
any one of them is pressed, it will complete a series circuit with
the specified resistance level between the ignition voltage source
(12v) and the SWC terminal on the radio. Scott.
 

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After 225k, I finally did this mod on my car. I don't know why I didn't do it sooner.
 

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Origional Write up on this one from Scott Mueller:
.............The '95-'96 Impala radios have the analog SWC feature built-in, all that
is needed is to connect the switches to the SWC terminal on the radio
for it to work. The switches work by connecting a pull-up resistance
value between a voltage source and the SWC terminal on the radio. By
reading the voltage present on the SWC terminal the radio can be made
to change stations, volume, etc. The switches and resistance values
are as follows:
Switch Function Resistance
-------------------------------
SW1 RH Volume UP 1270 ohms
SW2 RH Volume DOWN 294 ohms
SW3 RH Play 348 ohms
SW4 RH Mute 475 ohms
SW5 LH Seek UP 715 ohms
SW6 LH Seek DOWN 1180 ohms
SW7 LH AM/FM 2370 ohms
SW8 LH Preset 6980 ohms
........... Scott.
I know this is an old thread, but, searching, this has been the best data I have found so far. Does anybody know how to check the resistance of steering wheel buttons on a loose steering wheel? It made sense to me to check between the yellow (+12V) wire and the greed (signal to radio) wire for resistance and expected to see the above values for each button. We get nothing. So we tried from green wire to each of the other 3 and nothing.

I have a complete column already converted to a MC steering wheel and wanted to make sure it all worked before installation. We know teh clock spring is broken, and will need fixed, but we are checking on the steering wheel side of the clock ring and nothing.

Also, is the write up with pics on this mod anyplace other than this link - http://www.cardomain.com/ride/621882/6 - as I can't seem to get this link to work.

Last question, for the green signal wire, it needs to go to pin 14 on the radio which on my car is an empty socket. I assume I need to scavenge a terminal from someplace and populate that location. Correct?
 

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You can check the resistance values right at the buttons if you pop/pull them out of the steering wheel.

Yes, you'll need an extra pin to put in the radio harness. The junk yard is your friend on this one.
Thanks Bradley. We will give the "pop out the buttons and check" a try. I figured for sure there would be a way to check at the 4 pin connector though.

Thanks. I remembered I had an extra under dash harness and we can get a wire terminal from there.
 

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Thanks!

Radio Pin 5 (ground) to black wire from clock spring;
Radio Pin 7 (dimmer) to gray wire;
Radio Pin 9 (+12 power) to Yellow wire
Radio Pin 14 (signal) to green wire from clock spring
Origional Write up on this one from Scott Mueller:
-------------------------------
SW1 RH Volume UP 1270 ohms
SW2 RH Volume DOWN 294 ohms
SW3 RH Play 348 ohms
SW4 RH Mute 475 ohms
SW5 LH Seek UP 715 ohms
SW6 LH Seek DOWN 1180 ohms
SW7 LH AM/FM 2370 ohms
SW8 LH Preset 6980 ohms
Using this information one could build a remote control switch for
placement elsewhere in the car, such as in the trunk. All of the 8
switches should be wired in parallel with each other, such that when
any one of them is pressed, it will complete a series circuit with
the specified resistance level between the ignition voltage source
(12v) and the SWC terminal on the radio. Scott.
I wanted to update this thread with my experience with this as maybe it can help someone else down the road. I bought a used column with a Monte Carlo steering wheel already installed and SWC proper clock spring/wiring form a car that they were working. Something made me wonder about the wiring (probably my kids playing with the column in the garage and spinning the wheel freely a few hundred turns). So we check resistance across 12V (yellow) and signal wires (green) and nothing. So we pulled the air bag, checked each end of the clock spring wiring and nothing, dead open. So we then checked at the 4 pin steering wheel sub-harness connector on the proper wires (yellow clock spring wire is Lt. Blue on the sub-harness and green on clock spring is white on the wheel). Nothing, which is why I posted what I did.

So last night we disassembled the buttons and dug around. The resistance across each resistor matched the values from Scott's info above. We tracked the board runs and determined which solder joints to measure to verify the buttons working, and then tracked back to the wires in the sub-harness connector - lt. blue and white. I have no idea why we couldn't get readings there this past weekend, but it worked everytime yesterday.

So on to verifying resistance values for each button. What we found is that the resistors are wired in series with parallel drops to the signal wire when the buttons are pushed, which means that the resistance values seen on the signal wire add to each other, not individual parallel runs we expected. So if you want to check your steering wheel controls - either at the wheel sub-harness or at the end of the clock spring, you need to measure between yellow and green wires on the clock spring harness or the white and lt. blue connector on the steering wheel harness connector that connects to the clock spring connector. First value for each is the calculated value, 2nd value in ( xyz) is my actual measured value of my steering wheel controls.

SW1 RH Volume UP 1270 ohms (1.268 kohms)
SW2 RH Volume DOWN +294, 1564 ohms (1.561 kohms)
SW3 RH Play +348, 1912 ohms (1.91 kohms)
SW4 RH Mute +475, 2387 ohms (2.38 kohms)
SW5 LH Seek UP +715, 3102 ohms (3.09 kohms)
SW6 LH Seek DOWN +1180, 4282 ohms (4.26 kohms)
SW7 LH AM/FM +2370, 6652 ohms (6.62 kohms)
SW8 LH Preset +6980, 13632 ohms (13.63 kohms)

If you want to check your to-be-installed wheel with SWC and clock spring hardware before you spend the time, this should work and his how we did it. We will know hopefully this weekend, or mid next week once it is all wired in and functioning. Hope this helps.
 

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If anyone is interested in this Mod I came across a new wheel, SIR module and Airbag tonight. $500.00 for all 3 gets it. Wheel still wrapped in the factory plastic..
 

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Thanks!

Radio Pin 5 (ground) to black wire from clock spring;
Radio Pin 7 (dimmer) to gray wire;
Radio Pin 9 (+12 power) to Yellow wire
Radio Pin 14 (signal) to green wire from clock spring

Hopefully someone,can help me. I've got ground, power, and dimmer. I've got the monte wheel with harness going in a 96 Caprice with the ASWC-1 and Pioneer unit. The green wire to clockspring has been wired to the yellow/green wire from ASWC (wire it called out for 99 monte carlo), no luck. I even wired them both to the blue/white remote (what I'd call signal wire, but could be wrong) and nothing.

I'm thinking the green signal wire from clockspring should wire to one of the dozen wires on ASWC and then it plugs into radio using 3.5mm plug, but everything I read points to signal wire on cars harness. Our cars dont have this wire right? I feel like the folks above are talking OEM radios.
 

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Figured this out. From the clockspring, down to the stock monte connector, I wired yellow to yellow on ASWC, grey to orange dimmer, black to ground, and green to yellow with green stripe from ASWC. The trick was to solder the connection, I just had it all mocked up before. Now it works like factory.
 
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