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Discussion Starter #1
My original P/S pump finally died after 345,000 miles. 3 new (refurbed, no new ones exist) pumps later, still no fix.
1st one lasted about a thousand miles, then the P/S box started leaking, allowing air in the system, which killed the pump.
Both the pump and box and all hoses were replaced and the reservoir was cleaned and inspected, lasted about a thousand miles, pump got noisy again. replaced pump again, still noisy.

All 3 pumps came from GM.

Any help will be MUCH appreciated.

bill
 

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Try one from Rock Auto that is rebuilt by someone else for a start. Obviously buying from the same place with their brand is not working for you. Check your hoses for a collapsed one.
 

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I suggest getting yours rebuilt by Lee P/S. I only had the patience to R&R 1 pump after the RockAuto delco unit didn't solve my problem.

Lee P/S Has Returned!
 

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My original P/S pump finally died after 345,000 miles. 3 new (refurbed, no new ones exist) pumps later, still no fix.
1st one lasted about a thousand miles, then the P/S box started leaking, allowing air in the system, which killed the pump.
Both the pump and box and all hoses were replaced and the reservoir was cleaned and inspected, lasted about a thousand miles, pump got noisy again. replaced pump again, still noisy.

All 3 pumps came from GM.

Any help will be MUCH appreciated.

bill
I'd look to Lee as well if you still have your original OR look for a low mileage pump from a Known B-body car. I bought a spare "used" pump for just this reason.

I think the one reason (other than crappy rebuilds) you're having so many issues is that the LT1 pumps used in other cars like the Corvette and Camaro/Firebird, are very similar with 1 big difference...."I believe" they turn in the opposite rotation. It's highly possible they sold you the wrong pump. If you get the wrong pump, it may damage it in short order, although I'd be surprised it works at all.

Edit- be sure to FLUSH everything before putting in the new pump.
 

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Just obtained a Lee pump that's going in my '96 this week.

I recommend that you go this route.....especially since you'll be supporting a vendor in your state ;) .

KW
 

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I'd look to Lee as well if you still have your original OR look for a low mileage pump from a Known B-body car. I bought a spare "used" pump for just this reason.

I think the one reason (other than crappy rebuilds) you're having so many issues is that the LT1 pumps used in other cars like the Corvette and Camaro/Firebird, are very similar with 1 big difference...."I believe" they turn in the opposite rotation. It's highly possible they sold you the wrong pump. If you get the wrong pump, it may damage it in short order, although I'd be surprised it works at all.

Edit- be sure to FLUSH everything before putting in the new pump.
If you get the pump that was supposed to have the smooth pulley(reversed direction), not the grooves like our B-bodies have, the PS is harder to turn with the car running. I know this.

I love my LEEs rebuilt pump. Sadly you probably got rid of your 'good' OEM one for the core charge. No problem, a junkyard should have an OEM pump you can get.

LEEs takes about 2 weeks to turnaround, so be prepared to wait as well.

Something I noticed was that when I got my LEE pump back, my power steering fluid boiled the next day. So it started whining again. Called Steve at LEEs, and he said that I had to add a cooler to save the pump from certain soon death. So I added a cooler, you should too.

And yes, go get 3 or 4 bottles of valvoline power steering fluid and use at least 3 flushing it. A magnefine filter will also help you catch any other sediment that might get loosened up. Its going to cost money, but if you want another 350K mile run, this is the way to do it...

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My mechanic says he heard from a "parts guy" that there may be a pump from a 20xx truck that we can use and get new, not rebuilt.

anyone else heard anything on this?

also, i've sent a pump to lee's to be rebuilt, but still want to know if the above is a possibility.

and any info on the cooler would be much appreciated.

v/r bill
 

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If you get the pump that was supposed to have the smooth pulley(reversed direction), not the grooves like our B-bodies have, the PS is harder to turn with the car running. I know this.

The problem with getting a replacement pump from the parts store is that the Pulley is not mounted to the replacement Pump. You have to remove your old pulley and press it onto the new pump. So if they give you the wrong pump, you wont be able to tell by looking at the pulley and believe the pumps themselves look identical to each other.

I love my LEEs rebuilt pump. Sadly you probably got rid of your 'good' OEM one for the core charge. No problem, a junkyard should have an OEM pump you can get.

LEEs takes about 2 weeks to turnaround, so be prepared to wait as well.

Something I noticed was that when I got my LEE pump back, my power steering fluid boiled the next day. So it started whining again. Called Steve at LEEs, and he said that I had to add a cooler to save the pump from certain soon death. So I added a cooler, you should too.

That would be a huge concern to me that it was boiling. Did he say why it would do that and was it maybe due to their pump rebuilds being "tighter?" than the stock pump originally and generated LOTS more heat? Even adding the cooler, I would still have major concerns why the Boiling happened in the first place. It seems others have used these Lee Pumps/rebuilds recently....I'd be curious to hear if anyone else had to deal with Boiling Fluid as a result of the Lee Pump and add a very large cooler because of it? If that's the case, then should EVERYONE getting a Lee rebuild Pump also HAVE to install a Large PS cooler....is this what they are telling others to do??


To me, there are a bunch of these cars on the road for lots of years that as far as I know never exhibited this issue with the stock pumps. Sure, I've seen some mention of melted Reservoirs but also think these guys were on the track. I think you added a very large cooler to the front of your car to cool this fluid but us running an External Oil Cooler may not have the Real Estate to mount a large cooler like this for PS Fluid or even want to as part of the "Lee Rebuild". I can certainly understand them "recommending" a cooler but not recommending it til after the pump displayed boiling fluid. I would be more concerned (again, assuming no racing) as to why it boiled to begin with and never did with a Stock Pump.


Unless you are Autocrossing and driving your car extremely hard for hours, I see no reason to even have a PS cooler if the car is pretty much stock. Myself and others have added the 9C1 PS cooler which tucks nicely behind the lower portion of the rad support. Technically it's not a cooler but a Zig-zag return hose which gives the fluid a little more chance to cool before dumping back into the Reservoir. It is very easy to install and is a factory part designed for the 9C1 cars and available from any parts supplier that can be bolted up to any B-Body.
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And yes, go get 3 or 4 bottles of valvoline power steering fluid and use at least 3 flushing it. A magnefine filter will also help you catch any other sediment that might get loosened up. Its going to cost money, but if you want another 350K mile run, this is the way to do it...

Good luck.

Good call to add a filter....just in case. I added the Magnepure Filter to my return hose when installing the 9C1 Cooler.
See responses above in RED.
 

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See responses above in RED.
So I'll address your thoughts. And I'll tell you my thoughts and what I got from Steve.

When I first called him he diagnosed the fluid as boiling and once it boils, it is much more susceptible to pull air past the pump seal hence why once it happens, it happens more easily.

I think the reason it happened in the first place was a combination of sitting in traffic for a very long time, on one of the hotter days of the year and between the road engine and power steering fluid I used, it boiled just plain and simple. There is no expectation a system can cool itself at 5 mph (or less) while the PS lines literally cradle around the engine which is running hot because the fans kick on at 210.

Merely using the 9c1 cooler and getting the return away from the engine and giving it some chance to transfer heat (keep in mind, stock hoses on my car were all rubber, no heat transfer there) should provide adequate cooling to the fluid to keep it from boiling. A full on cooler isn't necessary, but once again, we get back to the cooler is better idea here.

So you're right he could use the 9c1 line and get great life from his new fluid and pump. For a little more money you could have a real setup and never have to worry though.

The real problem is.. Steve said you can't use synthetic in these systems because the seals will blow. So you can't get the benefits of the higher boiling temp synthetic fluid, which I did have at one point. And it worked very well. Then my pump quit. You tell me.

I can assure you my system is properly functioning and all is well. Steve said the vanes and all that were in great shape, just that seals were not in the best of shape and hence why the pump died. It was the gear oil put in there by the POs that really killed it, but that's none of my business... the thickness of 90 weight gear oil in a system designed for 5 weight will kill it every time. The pump will simply be strained A LOT.

I still recommend a filter. Lol

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 
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