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My 1A Auto opti has been failing so I started on its replacement today. I had the old opti out in under an hour, then discovered this:



The tip of the opti broke off inside the cam! The rest is somewhere in there:



I also discovered that the cap had warped somewhat. I haven’t taken it apart yet to see the inside.



I bought some picks at Autozone, but none of them get enough grip on the inside of the broken piece to pull it out. I feel like I need something that will go through the hole and then mushroom out, to get a good grip.



Alternatively, the pick goes in as far as the tip of my finger before it bottoms.



Looking at the new opti, there might be enough slack space inside the cam for me to just tap the broken piece in so deep that I can just install the new opti. But, if that doesn’t work, I’m pretty sure I’ll be screwed—cam coming out if the broken piece can’t go deep enough.



HELP! What should I do next?
 

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It's hollow...tap an easy out or similar in there and pull it out.
Or if you have a thread tap it would work as well.
A pick isn't going to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's hollow...tap an easy out or similar in there and pull it out.
Or if you have a thread tap it would work as well.
A pick isn't going to do it.
What'll prevent the broken piece from turning as I try to get something to bite into it?
 

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Maybe the tip of the pick jammed in there, between the shaft and the wall, will create enough friction to hold if from spinning. Pushing hard might do the trick


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Granted it's not the greatest thing to have; a piece of the old shaft stuck in the bore for it.

But if you aren't able to get it out, I really wouldn't think it would be that much of a big deal if it's down in the bore where it'll never again see the light of day.

Since it's got O-rings on it, it'll be a bit difficult to remove. If you can't get to create a bore/hole of some sort for an EZ-Out to dig into, or a tapping die {I'd only try the latter if you have compressed air which you can use to blow out any debris.}

That bore is used to keep the distributor shaft concentric with the camshaft itself, and that has not been compromised.

If the old piece doesn't easily come out, I would have no problem leaving the old piece where it is {You may have to actually push it in a little for the new distributor shaft}. The minor addition of mass to the entire assembly isn't going to affect anything, and like I wrote the bore of the camshaft hasn't been compromised to affect it's function, so it's not really a big deal; to me anyway.

If for some reason you'd like to know the dimensions of the opening, I can grab the new comp cams unit I have sitting under my bed, and get you what dimensions I can.
 

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if you tap ez out/thread tap w/ hammer it should bite into it.

you can also old school it...pack cavity w/ grease and tap a tight fitting rod/bolt in hole. the grease will push it out.

could also make your own puller out of small rod.
two pieces w/ small hooks, stuff in hole grab on each side and pull out.

should be easy to get out since it’s loose fit and only resistance will be from o-rings
 

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Try a magnet before drilling anything.
 

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[SNIP]

you can also old school it...pack cavity w/ grease and tap a tight fitting rod/bolt in hole. the grease will push it out.
I was going to mention this method, but wasn't sure how well it would work with the two o-rings working against you. Although it would be better than nothing.
 

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....under your bed? :)
Yeah awaiting it's install in a fresh rebuilt long block assembly I have. My buddy the previous owner didn't want to install a wild cam in his daughter's 9C1.

Didn't make much of a difference, she totalled the car anyway...

Under the bed would be better than in the bed in this case though...>:)
 

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If you clean the end, and hole, get a rod that just fits in the hole, then put some CA glue on the shaft, stick it in the hole. When the CA fires off, you should be able to pull it out. If you put a thin film of grease or oil on the inside of the bore, the CA will not stick to it. If the rod is not tight, use thick CA.
 

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I was going to mention this method, but wasn't sure how well it would work with the two o-rings working against you. Although it would be better than nothing.
o-rings wouldn’t be an issue. it works on TO bearings that are much tighter fit.
think about installing/removing an opti it is a pretty loose fit.
again really should be pretty easy to remove
 

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OP

try a pencil magnet as mentioned

If the broken shaft is hollow you could use a blind hole puller. This one works very well on pilot bearings but does have a smaller end in the kit. IDK if it would be small enough to fit inside the opti shaft...assuming the broken piece is hollow

I suspect a magnet would get it. I have one of those telescoping pencil ones which has a very good magnet on it

Here is the blind hole puller you get at autozone loan-a-tool thing. part # 27128
 

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OP

try a pencil magnet as mentioned

If the broken shaft is hollow you could use a blind hole puller. This one works very well on pilot bearings but does have a smaller end in the kit. IDK if it would be small enough to fit inside the opti shaft...assuming the broken piece is hollow

I suspect a magnet would get it. I have one of those telescoping pencil ones which has a very good magnet on it

Here is the blind hole puller you get at autozone loan-a-tool thing. part # 27128
You do realize that the picture is not actual size. The hole is about 1/8 inch in diameter.

A thin steel wire with a hook on the end that will just fit in the center hole should catch it and pull it out. Note the direction the hook is pointing, and put pressure in that direction until it catches the back.

If you can aim pressurized air into the center hole, or have a small tube to insert, it may push it out as well.

Another tool could be a tube with the end split, and a cone on a rod, or cone on a threaded rod that can spread it would grasp the hole or behind the hole. You will probably have to make this tool.
 

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You could also try a pair of circlip pliers for external clips if the points are close enough.
 

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yeah Fred the broken shaft is likely way to small for the blind hole puller

I think the magnet will work. Mine (pic) is 3/8" wide.

If the broken shaft is hollow...a ez-out bit may be able to grab it just using by hand

or cut/bend one of the hook tools the Op got

Broken shaft should not really be wedged in...
 

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Bend a paper clip into a fish hook just narrow enough to fit into the hole.
Push it all the way through, then grab the paper clip with some pliers. Done!

Nab
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I was able to get it out with this Kobalt screw extractor kit from Lowes, which was ~$13. It came out surprisingly easy—maybe because of the WD40 I sprayed in there beforehand.



There was a bunch of oil on the piece. Some people insist that the o-rings are just to keep the opti shaft centered in the cam, and I’m not saying they’re wrong, but there sure is a lot of oil for the o-rings not to be doing some kind of oil-control duty.



Thanks for the help, everyone!
 

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Glad to hear.
Now to the pertinent question: Why did it break ?
 

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...There was a bunch of oil on the piece. Some people insist that the o-rings are just to keep the opti shaft centered in the cam, and I’m not saying they’re wrong, but there sure is a lot of oil for the o-rings not to be doing some kind of oil-control duty.
The o-rings are not for oil control. Let's think about the geometry of the pieces.

The portion of the shaft you pulled out from the camshaft is hollow. The portion still attached to the distributor has a hole drilled perpendicular to the shaft that intersects with the central hole. If that hole, which is exposed to oil splash from the timing chain is connected to the hose through the shaft, oil is going to get into the cavity and "behind" the o-rings, which isn't an issue of concern.

The aforementioned holes in the shaft are to allow air to escape when the shaft is stabbed into the camshaft instead of causing that air to compress, which would make installation more difficult.
 
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