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Try replacing ONE front lower control arm.
I did that when I first got the car. I'm not sure what would be difficult about that. One bolt on each end.
Or ONE rear axle.
I've removed front axles at the junkyard, but I haven't installed them.
second batteries under the floor pan that require removal of the driver's seat 馃檮
That I have not seen.
Or try changing just the accessory belt.
A common vehicle owner should not be expected to have remove the front bumper (which involves disconnecting the wet lines of the headlight washers) and slide the entire radiator support structure forward by 3" just to change a damn accessory belt. That's ludicrous
You should really never have to change the accessory belt between scheduled maintenance intervals.

When a 2.7T breaks, it's virtually always because of some maintenance item that was supposed to be replaced during the timing job but wasn't.

Putting the front end in service mode would be a lot of work for a belt, but for some things (like R&R of the drivetrain and timing jobs) it's easier than most cars.

I must give you credit for not mentioning the steering rack on the B5/C5. I'm told you Audi mechanics joke that the car was built around it. Supposedly there are 3 big bolts, and one of them is so hard to get to that even the dealerships skip it on install and just use 2 bolts.
 

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1993 RMW, 1996 RMW, 1992 OCC
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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Road junk happens. And when many people don't bother putting the underbody shield back on after every damn oil change, things get knocked up there and the belt gets damaged, thereby needing replacement. I worked at a shop that specialized in German cars. All this "in an ideal world" stuff is a bunch of crap. The designs are garbage and intended solely for ease of assembly on an assembly line, not for maintenance.

Come change the alternator on my V8 allroad and tell me it was due because of "lack of maintenance" 馃ぃ

The only time I ever did a steering rack on a B5 was while I was doing a TDI swap, so the entire subframe was removed. I can't imagine EVER having to do that while the engine is in the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
V8 and V6 have literally nothing in common. The V8 on a C5 allroad is timed with a chain instead of a belt. There's no reason to ever put the carrier in service position except to do very basic maintenance because there's no timing belt to change. There's 3 timing chains. They live behind the engine, between the engine and transmission. They're supposed to be a lifetime thing, like they never need changing. The whole shebang usually fails around 120 to 180k miles. It's inevitable and gradual, so you at least get some warning before the valves get bent if you're paying attention. Dealer charges about $6000 to repair. Just the parts is around $2800, and they last another 120-180k miles. Upgraded parts that won't fail are about $7000, but sadly they don't install themselves, even at that price. Many people who attempt the job themselves end up wrecking the engine, thereby lighting $2800 to $7000 on fire and watching it burn while singing "kumbaya". Not due to incompetence, but solely because its such a difficult job. It's a thing of beauty.
 

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V8 and V6 have literally nothing in common.
Eh, I don't think you mean "literally". All of Audi's engines from that era were basically the same thing with more or less cylinders.

I know there is a big difference between a belt engine and a chain engine, but you can't deny that the 6, 8, and 10 cylinder engines are all the same architecture. They share everything from engine internals to electronics.
They're supposed to be a lifetime thing, like they never need changing. The whole shebang usually fails around 120 to 180k miles.
Do the chain engines have the little plastic guides or whatever that always break from heat cycling?

That's a common thing with the V6. People do the timing belt but not the plastic pieces.
 

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The belt tensioner on the A3 was also an impossible task, well not one I wanted to do at least, I can't remember exactly what it was but the way that the tensioner is in the block I have no idea how to remove it. Should have been easy, it was not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
Eh, I don't think you mean "literally". All of Audi's engines from that era were basically the same thing with more or less cylinders.
No I mean quite literally. The V6 is 60 degrees. The V8 is 90 degrees. There's no common parts. Not even pistons or rods. There were with the previous iterations, the V8 basically used 2x I-4 bits, but not the chained V8.

edit to add: oops, forgot the V6 is also 90 degrees. But they still share no components.

Do the chain engines have the little plastic guides or whatever that always break from heat cycling?

That's a common thing with the V6. People do the timing belt but not the plastic pieces.
No. Those would be maintenance items. You can't prevent the failure except by replacing all the $2800 worth of parts, the only option is to either wait until the engine starts losing power, or do it preemptively just for the joy of throwing $2800 down the toilet before it's necessary. The chain setup was designed for zero maintenance. The chain VVT mechanism fails, leading to catastrophic timing failure. It's all internal and made of metal gears. The design was a complete failure. This is the same engine that's found in B6/B7 S4s.
 

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No I mean quite literally. The V6 is 60 degrees. The V8 is 90 degrees. There's no common parts. Not even pistons or rods. There were with the previous iterations, the V8 basically used 2x I-4 bits, but not the chained V8.
Just so I'm clear, you're saying your V8 is essentially the next generation, but that the previous 4.2 in the C5 was the same architecture as the V6. Right?

I would swear I remember reading that the rods were the same between all of them, and that the primary differences were just the bore and number of cylinders.

I want to say the 4 banger even uses the same rods as the V10.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
Oh that could be, I don't really remember at this point. But a commonality in rods means absolutely nothing when it comes to actually maintaining a car. Nobody is ripping out the rotating assembly when doing a timing job. Heck, the LS7 uses the same lifters as a 3800 V6. That's not a design commonality. The LS7 is not related to a 3800 V6.
 

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Oh that could be, I don't really remember at this point. But a commonality in rods means absolutely nothing when it comes to actually maintaining a car. Nobody is ripping out the rotating assembly when doing a timing job. Heck, the LS7 uses the same lifters as a 3800 V6. That's not a design commonality. The LS7 is not related to a 3800 V6.
I was just responding to your "literally" remark. But, you're right.

Didn't somebody make a V12 LS by welding on another half a block or something? I know there are aftermarket LS blocks with more cylinders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Hey don't get me wrong, if you enjoy wrenching on Audi/VWs and you're good at it, go nuts. I still do it for family and friends in a pinch. But after decades of doing it, many of those years for a living, I would never recommend those cars to a typical car owner who does occasionally DIY maintenance. Ain't nobody gonna convince me that those German cars are DIY-owner-friendly. At this point in my life, I prefer an engine where I can swap the alternator out in 10 minutes on the side of the highway (which has happened a surprising number of times).
 

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I wonder how close these mounts are to our body boxes at the bottom of the firewall.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle


The motor mounts are similar to ours:
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Wood Automotive exterior Art


Also in the above picture, you can see how ridiculous it is to think you could pull this off with the B-body engine cradle in place.

At the very least, the engine cradle needs to get sawed out of there. Nobody is doing AWD until they accept this.
 
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