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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Long story short. I’m rebuilding my rear end. I received my new socket in the mail for final assembly as my stock pinion nut is 32mm and my Motive Gear kit came with a 33mm. I’m planning to use my 1/2 inch drive leverage bar, my homemade yoke wrench and my new Home Depot socket. Pictures Provided. I’m concerned on how much stress crushing the crush sleeve puts on the breaker bar drive. Am I going to be ok? Thanks. I had no problems preloading with test bearings whatsoever just concerned on final assembly when I get there. Thanks.
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Once you get it to "no play" in the bearings, turn it a little at a time (1/8 turn) until you get to between 18-34 inch lbs of torque to turn the pinion. You will find that you need an extension on the 1/2 inch breaker bar. You may even need an extension on the yoke tool to be able to turn the nut. You are compressing the crush sleeve, and it takes a bit of force to do so. If you go over the 34 inch lbs, you will have to take it apart, and replace the crush sleeve, and try again.

I had to get about a 3 ft length on both to exert enough force to turn the pinion nut. That is probably the most difficult part of installing a gearset.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Once you get it to "no play" in the bearings, turn it a little at a time (1/8 turn) until you get to between 18-34 inch lbs of torque to turn the pinion. You will find that you need an extension on the 1/2 inch breaker bar. You may even need an extension on the yoke tool to be able to turn the nut. You are compressing the crush sleeve, and it takes a bit of force to do so. If you go over the 34 inch lbs, you will have to take it apart, and replace the crush sleeve, and try again.

I had to get about a 3 ft length on both to exert enough force to turn the pinion nut. That is probably the most difficult part of installing a gearset.
Thanks for the reply Fred. I think this question was talked about briefly in my other posts on the rear end rebuild. I’ve never crushed a sleeve so curious if my Home Depot socket and harbor freight leverage breaker is going to hold up. I’ll use the extension pipes too If needed. With all this Corona Virus stuff, I kind of slowed down and took a break. I did clean my brake plates up. I didn’t paint them and still debating that because I can’t get nobody to ship the Por 15 thinner Yet. I don’t want a really thick coat on them. Maybe on the outside but not the inside. I’m waiting for a pressure washer to come in the mail as mine failed. I want to knock some of the grime build up off the under body and get the last of my Por 15 on areas of the frame too. I just received a new socket for pinion install In the mail (chrome one in the pictures). It’s a 33mm because the Motive Gear Kit from summit came with a 33mm. The stock nut/socket was a 32mm. I got that one for 5 bucks at a local tool warehouse around here. They didn’t have the 33mm. Got it on Home Depot.com for like around 12 Dollars. Again. Thanks.
 

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Once you get it to "no play" in the bearings, turn it a little at a time (1/8 turn) until you get to between 18-34 inch lbs of torque to turn the pinion. You will find that you need an extension on the 1/2 inch breaker bar. You may even need an extension on the yoke tool to be able to turn the nut. You are compressing the crush sleeve, and it takes a bit of force to do so. If you go over the 34 inch lbs, you will have to take it apart, and replace the crush sleeve, and try again.

I had to get about a 3 ft length on both to exert enough force to turn the pinion nut. That is probably the most difficult part of installing a gearset.
just a bit of force lol
I used a 4' long 3/4" drive and a 36" pipe wrench & rag in lieu of the yoke tool. I'm not confident that any old 1/2" breaker bar would have survived.
 

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Once the sleeve starts to compress , the wild force required , does drop , but still is pretty high.
The biggest issue I see here is, I typically put some loctite on the nut on the final tightening.
If you do that, are in the middle of the operation and the flex bar or socket breaks, you are fu&^ed.
If you are planning on loctite.
You might want to consider starting the crush with the old nut and lubrication , on threads and under the head of the nut.
A proper lube will lower the force required.
Once you get past the initial crush and are near zero clearance, remove the old nut, clean up , new nut , loctite, finish job.
Tie a rag around the flex bar joint so, if it does blow up, you don't get it in the face.
I typically have no issue with my name brand 1/2 flex bar , but use my 3/4 ratchet when there is room.
Did someone say selective preload spacers and shim ? ;)
 

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I used my 1/2 inch Craftsman ratcheting breaker bar and a 2 ft. extension. I also used the JEG's brand yoke tool and a 2 ft. extension. No rags, just put one against my belly, and pulled the other one with both hands.

The nut is a prevailing torque nut, and needs no locking compound.
 

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needs no locking compound.
Correct, NEEDS no locking compound, by definition of the nut
Ever seen a pinion nut back off , and I am not talking about lost preload?
I choose to do it.
Suspenders and a belt
Different ways to do things, just look at our two cars.
 

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i've seen them back off as well and also always put blue loctite on for extra insurance. i was also taught to get a regular plain nut to crush the sleeve, then put the self-locking nut on when everything is tickety boo.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I went ahead and picked up these two items from Home Depot just now. They will be here in 30 days. Maybe less. 3/4 drive 40 inch bar. Sensing things from others comments, I think this should get the job done. I have a Proto breaker bar too but its also a 1/2 drive. Id rather break this new tool than break the 1/2 inch tools then to ALSO break the new breaker bar tool. I’d be pretty pissed by then. 🙂 I’ll just have another breaker bar around Incase I ever need it. From the look of things, seeing pictures of tools, 1 inch drive tools, I don’t even think those level sockets fit in the stock yoke space. I may be wrong. I’ve seen sockets turned down on the nose end. But they are pricey. Anyway. Waiting 30 days. I got some things I can do until then. Paint my diff cover, brake plates (Another post coming up), pressure wash the under car and paint frame spots. Get my rotors turned (another post coming up). This (rear rebuild) all should be rolling down hill when I get going. Thanks again. Hoping this bar I ordered does it. Note: that motive gear prevailing torque nut that came in my kit sure is beefier than the stock one. Probably a good thing. As for using the stock nut to get the crush sleeve to begin collapsing, I understand the concept but don’t want to go too far. I feel safer going in with the new Motive Gear nut once with blue loctite. This all being it’s my first build.
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Discussion Starter #11
Once the sleeve starts to compress , the wild force required , does drop , but still is pretty high.
The biggest issue I see here is, I typically put some loctite on the nut on the final tightening.
If you do that, are in the middle of the operation and the flex bar or socket breaks, you are fu&^ed.
If you are planning on loctite.
You might want to consider starting the crush with the old nut and lubrication , on threads and under the head of the nut.
A proper lube will lower the force required.
Once you get past the initial crush and are near zero clearance, remove the old nut, clean up , new nut , loctite, finish job.
Tie a rag around the flex bar joint so, if it does blow up, you don't get it in the face.
I typically have no issue with my name brand 1/2 flex bar , but use my 3/4 ratchet when there is room.
Did someone say selective preload spacers and shim ? ;)
I’m still considering your technique here. Just saying.
 

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If you don't want a 30 day waiting period, that socket is $14 on amazon and ships today, have it tomorrow (for "free" shipping if you're a prime member)


Same with the breaker bar.


I'd be tempted to get a shorter breaker bar and use a pipe if necessary for more leverage. The head is the same strength regardless and the longer one is much more difficult to make shorter than it is to make the shorter one longer :).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you don't want a 30 day waiting period, that socket is $14 on amazon and ships today, have it tomorrow (for "free" shipping if you're a prime member)


Same with the breaker bar.


I'd be tempted to get a shorter breaker bar and use a pipe if necessary for more leverage. The head is the same strength regardless and the longer one is much more difficult to make shorter than it is to make the shorter one longer :).
How is a 1/2 wratchet drive equally as strong as a 3/4 wratchet drive? Unless your saying the stem at the neck is equally as strong... But it’s a different tool. There’s got to be some strength difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
@ Fix Until Broke. Thanks for the link to Amazon on the bar. Amazon had A torque spec rating. The one I bought exceeds the 1/2 inch on torque by far. Also probably a better tool than Harbor freights (one of the ones I have). The spec should be inclusive of the handle in my opinion. Your idea, I agree on ridgidness-maybe less flex. I could always put a pipe over it. My diff is out the car So the 40 inches won’t be in the way. It will be equally in length with my yoke tool. Feed back appreciated.
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Discussion Starter #16
Just for whatever reason anybody wants to see. The Harbor Freight 3/4 drive 20 inch rates at 750foot pounds. “Probably“ always good to refer to the manufacture documentation.
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These will do it for you 😏😄😄
1000 ft lb snap on torque wrench and 1400 ft lb Paoli DP2000s
 

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