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1991 Chevy Caprice 9C1
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having my trans rebuilt (700R4) (3.43) I have a '91 9C1. I want it snatching off the line. What is a good stall on that?
 

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1991 Chevy Caprice 9C1
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Discussion Starter #4
I had an ‘89 box that I upgraded from a 305 to a 350, 200R4 to 700RF that thang was MOVIN. I feel like the joint I have now is a lil behind. But I did have the ‘89 professionally built when I decided to upgrade. 0 miles on the trans and engine
 

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I learned something new today - Thanks.

Sorry I don't have a converter recommendation for you other than to say it's a balance between drivability, traction and your engine.

A 4,000 RPM stall will be really "snatchy" and likely smoke the tires easily, but will generally suck from a drivability standpoint - fun for a few miles or at the track, but otherwise horrible.
 

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1991 Chevy Caprice 9C1
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Discussion Starter #6
It’s all good. My daughter taught me something today. It’s a bad day when we don’t learn something new. The mind never stops evolving.
Yea, I was thinking that. I feel 2400-3000 might be ok, but I just wanna see if anyone has done it. It’s got a lot of kick now as is.
 

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I have a 1984 MCSS with a 355(450hp) and the 2004R transmission with 3.73 gears. I have a 2400 stall and that seems to be plenty. I can annihilate the rear tires from a dead stop. If I take it back to the 1/4 mile track, I need to upgrade to at least a 3200-3600 and some sticky slicks. Daily driving with a 2400 is fairly tame.

On my Impala I have a 2800 and really need a 3200. I called Yank and they suggested the 3200 for me and my intended uses of my Impala.

I would suggest calling the people at Yank and get their expert advise.
 
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I would suggest calling the people at Yank and get their expert advise.
Just to add - Yank custom builds each converter to their customer, so you can't just get a recommendation and then shop that around. They do build really good torque converters, so it'll be money well spent buying through them.
 

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As long as you are in your torque band, it should be a good number to use. e.g If your torque band starts at 2000, a 2000 is going to give you a good start. Going higher will give you more flywheel effect, but it will be sloppier to drive normally the higher you go. The rpm of the torque converter tells you at what rpm the car will move, or the engine will stop increasing in rpm, and something (the weakest point) may break. It is sort of like a clutch that will only fully engage at a certain rpm but will drag a little on the way there.
 

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OP

unless its a 1/4 mi only car, get a 2400 especially if you have a stock cam motor. It you are running a big cam than 2800-3k

I use Hughes converter when my Imp was a auto car. T56 now so my left foot is my stall converter
 

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1991 Chevy Caprice 9C1
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Discussion Starter #11
I found a place up here that’s does custom builds in going to go wit 2400 on the stall..
I am going to put a hotter cam in here.. like next month.
 

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unless its a 1/4 mi only car, get a 2400 especially if you have a stock cam motor. It you are running a big cam than 2800-3k

I use Hughes converter when my Imp was a auto car. T56 now so my left foot is my stall converter
All torque converters are stall converters. The rpm that they stall at is the difference.
 

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All torque converters are stall converters. The rpm that they stall at is the difference.
Yeah Fred, I know. The cam and the TC should be matched. High stall and stock motor no Bueno. and a camed motor with stock stall also no. Car weight and gearing also are part of the equation in selecting a TC

Also higher stall TC create more heat so "additional" trans cooler is recommended. 2400 and under should be OK with stock trans cooler although a trans temp gauge will always show wtf is going on so if temps run high, add a better external cooler
 

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1991 Chevy Caprice 9C1
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Discussion Starter #14
Great info gentlemen. The car has a stock trans cooler on it already. So that’s good. It is a police package and the car runs STRONG as is. I’m sitting at 166k only thing I’ve done is upgrade the ignition system with a lil MSD action.
 

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Don't buy the converter until you decide on the cam.
Good advice. Ask the cam manufacturer what they recommend for the cam. The stall speed will also be determined by your type of intake manifold, and exhaust. Dual plane will be lower, stock manifolds will be lower, single plane manifold will be higher, and headers will be higher. The single plane will give you a higher power band, and the headers will also raise the power band. Look to the total upgrade package. For street, a dual plane manifold will give you a more comfortable power band, Headers will raise it a little, and you can still be streetable. Do not forget to modify your trans crossmember to accept dual exhausts if you are going to use headers. Make the mod while you are swapping the TC, and you will be ready when you get to the exhaust. You can get a muffler mount from any 91-93, and it will bolt into the existing holes on the driver's side.
 

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1991 Chevy Caprice 9C1
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Discussion Starter #17
Good advice. Ask the cam manufacturer what they recommend for the cam. The stall speed will also be determined by your type of intake manifold, and exhaust. Dual plane will be lower, stock manifolds will be lower, single plane manifold will be higher, and headers will be higher. The single plane will give you a higher power band, and the headers will also raise the power band. Look to the total upgrade package. For street, a dual plane manifold will give you a more comfortable power band, Headers will raise it a little, and you can still be streetable. Do not forget to modify your trans crossmember to accept dual exhausts if you are going to use headers. Make the mod while you are swapping the TC, and you will be ready when you get to the exhaust. You can get a muffler mount from any 91-93, and it will bolt into the existing holes on the driver's side.
Thanks for the info. The car came stock with true duals. It hauls ass as is right now. Its a '91 9C1, 3.42 in the rear-stock.
 

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The 91 9C1 did not come with true duals. It came with a single exhaust. Someone must have converted it at some point. They did com with 3.42s in some cases.
 

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1991 Chevy Caprice 9C1
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Discussion Starter #19
The 91 9C1 did not come with true duals. It came with a single exhaust. Someone must have converted it at some point. They did com with 3.42s in some cases.
It did come with true duals. I bought it from the second owner, he got it from the police auction. Old ATF car. It still has the original paperwork and all. The car has not been hacked on or modified in anyway out side of the MSD set up I put on there. I even went through all the RPO codes.
 
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