Chevy Impala SS Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well I know there is someone around here who has used this product before so perhaps he can offer some advice. I attempted to paint my hood today with rustoleum rattlecan satin black, and it came out all "stripey" looking. Some of the lines look shiner than others, and it makes it have a definitive striped look to it. I just don't know what I'm doing wrong! I'm holding the can as far away as the can says to, I'm trying to apply multiple light coats...

any ideas?
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Thats from uneven coverage. You can have the same thing happen with professional equipment if you don't know WTF you're doing. What you're gonna wanna do is paint straight across - then go again jsut below it with 50% overlap onto the first. That, and keeping the can a consistant distance - and parallel to the surface should help.

That's jsut basic painting stuff though - I don't know shiit about satin black and I actually hope I never have to paint a car that color. :rolleyes:
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yup, Bewbs is right. It's a coverage problem, not a paint problem. the best way to get good even coverage from a rattle can is to paint each coat a different direction. Do the first side to side, then up and down, then diagonal. Like Bewbs said, you want to overlap your strokes about 50%. I usually hold my rattle cans closer than the can recomends, and try to spray it wet enough that it's just before the point of running/sagging.

Now, about the satin black. I'm quite familiar with satin paint, and making it/keeping it looking nice. Here's what I recomend. Get some #0000 super fine steel wool. Scuff the whole car with it. This will even out the texture without really removing any paint. Then spray the whole thing down with WD-40 and wipe it down. This should leave you with a nice even satin sheen. That's what I've used on my truck for the last 3 years with excellent results. I reapply the WD-40 every 3 months or so once it starts to get dull. I rarley even wash the thing, just dust it off anw WD-40. It acts as a cleaner and protectant. Make sure you only ever use WD-40 and NEVER use a product with silicon in it. Obviously wou'll want to test it in an inconspicuous spot to make sur eit doesnt desolve the paint(it shouldn't but you never know)

 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dude that effin truck just never quits being cool! Now that we have the prollum solved - hijack this sumbitch and please be so kind as to show us more!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also try the trigger attatchment from Rustoleum
. I used one and did my whole wagon. No problems with coverage except for the top behind the windshield. That was a bitch since the wagon was in the garage and I couldn't get on top of it. I had to reach across and try to spray front to back. Total pain in the ass. I used Rustoleum Flat Black. Will probably go over it again with Satin. Looks much better than it did.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm a better thread killer than hijacker(and I don't have many good pics at the moment), so this is just for you John...




Oh, and Dave, the can gun that Thom posted is a great help, especially if you've got paint gun experience. I've seen them for under $2 at Wal-mart.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
God love ya Brother Tanko!!!

That's the only reason I came back into this damn thread! LOL.

I love that sumbitch - too damn cool to be flyin the flag in the rear glass IMO.

Why you flippin it?
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yeah, I had the same problem when I sprayed my first one. Get one of the triggers as mentioned above, it REALLY helps. Also, SLOW DOWN and keep a consistant speed back and forth. I found my "return" pass was much quicker than my first one if I wasn't paying constant attention to it. The FATWUDY came out MUCH smoother and even-er (?) than the FATWAGN did. :cool:

Keep at it, you'll get it!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, here's the thing. I've been experimenting with some paints and techniques on an old hood, and the paint that has came out the smoothest and even-est is.... 96 cent wal-mart colorplace brand flat black. So are there a variety of reasons why i shouldn't use this product to paint a car?
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Probably not. The best protectant your car will ever see is the baked on factory paint job. As long as you're just hiding it and not removing it to REPLACE the factory job with cheap shiit - you chould be allright.

Going over top of the cheap stuff with good paint at some point MAY become an issue, but that involves too many "ifs" to matter at this point.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Actually, the Colorplace is a remarkably high quality paint. My ex girlfriend did her entire '59 Dodge with it, and it tuurned out fantastic. It took 19 cans if I remember right. Sounds like alot of spraypaint, but it was still less than 20 bucks to do the whole car(and that's a big damn car). It's also held up very well. Alot of the gloss Colorplace paints arent the best, but the flats and satins are great.

Bewbs, it's a time/place thing. I've got to many irons and not enough fire. I don't have space anymore, or the modivation for that matter. I almost had a buyer last week, but he couldnt come up with the $$$.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top