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EVAP has so many advantages to prevent gasoline from "going flat" ,and/or contamination from moisture building up in tank. Also by allowing tank to become pressurized ,takes some load off fuel pump , and prevents formation of air bubbles.
 

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1995 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham
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I bought a new filter for my canister, but haven't messed with it.

Where are the hard lines on the frame rail supposed to go? I think I broke one of mine.
 

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I bought a new filter for my canister, but haven't messed with it.

Where are the hard lines on the frame rail supposed to go? I think I broke one of mine.
One goes to the tank along the passenger frame rail, the other goes to the evap purge solenoid on the manifold. The line along the frame is flexible tubing (maybe nylon) in the rail.
 

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Great thread/updates.
My evap system looks just like yours did, but I can't decide if I should just fully delete it, or try and restore it like yours.... I'm leaning toward delete since it's mostly a track car that gets driven to work a few times a month April-October.
Here is what I used for replacing the evap lines at the canister.There are 5 different line sizes.
3/16 ID 4.25 inch
1/4 ID 10.25 inch
5/16 ID 3.5, 4.0, 7.75 inch (3pcs)
3/8 ID 4.62, 7.75, 14.5 inch (3pcs)
5/32 ID didn't measure. about 4 inch
I also bought the Dorman 13400 hose clamp assortment to replace some rusty clamps
 

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Discussion Starter · #205 ·
Before we get too far away from the exhaust, the late '95 and 96 style exhaust manifolds can be plugged with 3/4-16 pipe plugs. The earlier style can be replaced with M22x1.5 plugs; it's an interference fit but it seals and keeps them from falling out. The technically correct thread is 7/8-18, but after having custom machined plugs back out on my old '95 Caprice 9C1 one day, I just put in the M22x1.5s and never had a problem since.

I debated keeping the AIR Pump system in place, but it really cleans up the front of the motor to remove it, and while you have the engine out, it's the perfect time to remove it. I saved all the parts.
199010


It's a bummer that the whole system got a bad name simply because nobody replaced the check valves on a regular basis; those check valves are cheap too. That is so often the story of life; we don't take care of the little important things that are not urgent, and then later on they lead to expensive and urgent problems. Oh well. There's a life lesson learned just in this little old system.
199011
 

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Discussion Starter · #206 ·
My apologies on these pics being a little disorganized; I have literally hundreds of them. As I was installing the new AC compressor, I got a tip from Sprocket that the aftermarket compressors have a shallower stud hole than the original, and you need to grind down the original stud so it fully bottoms against the compressor. Sure enough, that was the case. Here's the standard trick to remove a stud - put two nuts on it, then wrench it out.

199012


One wrench didn't do it so I had to use a second wrench to keep the nuts from turning.
199013


At first I went ahead and installed the stud, but see the gap circled in red? This amount is probably OK, but me being me, I took it back out and shortened it a little more. Any more gap than this will prevent the lines from being properly tightened.
199025
 

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Discussion Starter · #207 ·
It is wise never to throw out old parts until you have the new ones installed, so you can use them as a guide. Here's the old B-body AC lines. Compared to the dual system in my minivan, this system is so simple. And low side accumulators/dryers for the win, just from a physics perspective (I'd much rather have a big tank full of 30psi than 250psi).

I tend to replace these lines when I do a compressor replacement. First, the original lines often rubbed on the upper control arm, causing leaks. Second, the high side pressure test port is not separately replaceable and I've had several of these leak. You have to partially disconnect them anyway when doing a compressor replacement, and to replace the orifice tube. The lines are cheap, and the new GM lines had plenty of clearance from everything, including the control arm.
199016


Here's a top view of the compressor installed. See the area circled in purple? That's the joint I was talking about - with the stud ground down, the lines are nice and tight against the back of the compressor.
199017


Replacing O-rings is cheap insurance against future leaks. Always use some PAG oil (if working with R134a systems).
199018


New seals on the new lines lubricated.
199019


This was a GM/Delco compressor and it was shipped with no oil, so I had to add oil to it. Many aftermarket compressors ship either completely full of oil, or with the correct amount. It is very important not to have too much oil in the system; compressors don't last long trying to compress oil. If you get too much in, get the system sucked out of refrigerant, then let the AC system rest for a few days, crack open the lowest point of the system, and let any extra oil drain out.

Since this compressor was dry, once the lines were tight on the back of the compressor, I poured oil down the line from the accumulator and then turned the compressor a few turns to let it get inside the compressor and sit. That way, it can seep down into the crankcase. I let the car sit a few weeks like this, then vacuumed out and charged the system. Always turn the compressor by hand until it any remaining liquid oil is pumped out into the lines, otherwise you'll hurt the valves inside when you first engage it. To my surprise, by the time I got around to doing this the compressor turned completely freely with no liquid in the cylinders at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #208 ·
Time to put the passenger inner fender in so I can finish the AC system and all the accessories. Lots of masking tape to protect everything. Assembling painted parts takes forever.
199020


And.. at least an hour later. Inner fender is in, and tight. All mounting studs sprayed with motorcycle chain lube and gently installed. Notice the nice clean non-corroded inner fender. Thank you CrimeSScene96 for sourcing one for me. The runs are motorcycle chain lube; I wiped the excess away before it fully congealed.
199021


Both inner fenders installed. It almost seems a shame to mount everything to them, but I do like AC, power steering, cruise control, cooling and windshield washers.
199022


Getting the inner fender to play nice with the radiator support and front end was tricky. Maybe everything had sagged a bit being on jackstands for two years? I jacked up the front of the car under the cross member and got a little more room to bolt things together.

Here's the new battery tray.
199023


All powdercoated and purdy.
199024
 

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Discussion Starter · #209 ·
It's a good time, when you've got an AC system sucked out, to inspect and replace the orifice tube. Automotive systems either use an orifice tube or a thermal expansion valve to provide the pressure/phase change boundary. These cars use the orifice tube. Here's the old one; fortunately it's very clean; if you see metal shavings, that means the compressor is self-destructing. If you see a lot of goo, that likely means moisture was not fully vacuumed out of the system and it reacted with the refrigerant/oil.

When my brother and I started working on the car at our parents' house, the system was at 7psi, so since it hadn't been exposed to air, we just threw some dye and two 12oz cans into it and it worked great. But within two weeks it had leaked out through the compressor nose seal. I find this is common in B-bodies between 150k-200k miles.

Here is the original orifice tube. It's remarkably clean. Fine goo in the outlet (at left) but after 170k that's still really good.
199058


New orifice tube for comparison:
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Installing into the lower condensor line next to the battery (be sure to lubricate the O-ring with PAG oil):
199060


Then I buttoned up the system and let it sit for a week to let the oil drain into the bottom of the compressor.
 
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Discussion Starter · #210 ·
Next step was to route the power steering hoses. I think it was Navy Lifer that lobbied Gates to make replacement hoses for these cars? (Thank you!!) All new high pressure, return and reservoir lines are very affordable and cheap insurance, for sure. Especially since they are mild steel and are prone to corrosion because they're mounted so low.

Routing hoses on the passenger side fender is always time consuming. So much happening in so little space. Getting everything test fit before I install the clamps on the power steering lines. I think I did cut an inch or two off the return line from the box to the reservoir just to get the hose a little more relaxed.
199061


New AC lines mounted into the plastic clamp that locks into the inner fender. I got some primer overspray on the fuse box I'll need to remove with a scuff pad. Once all this is done, I'll run the new AC Delco 155 508 heater core lines (which include a new restrictor and T). I consider these mandatory for any B-body that will venture more than a few miles from home.
199062


I did decide to reuse the original AC accumulator/dryer (the big aluminum tank in the AC system). Since the orifice tube was so clean, and the inside of the accumulator/dryer was so clean, I didn't see any harm in doing so. The reason I wanted to keep it was because the factory tank has the system capacity on it; the aftermarket one I had didn't. And since I have a two-stage vacuum pump, I can suck it down for two hours and boil off any residual moisture anyway, restoring the dessicant.

Sharp-eyed observers will note the bright copper color of the battery terminals. I removed the studs, then the plastic ends, and cleaned them real good with CRC battery terminal protectant spray. That stuff works miracles on ugly battery terminals, and the red dye lets you know there's still some chemical life left in it. I like to soak cable ends several times to get the protectant down into the copper strands to protect them from future moisture.
 
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OK, before Caddylack fully commandeers this thread... let's get back to work.
On the ignition coil stud are a bunch of PCM grounds. Those wires tend to fatigue and break, giving really weird drivability problems. Shortly after I reinstalled the motor, I replaced all of the ground connectors with new ones. You should seriously consider doing the same on your car.
View attachment 198949
Late add

If doing the grounds, one might want to use a more robust terminal , more like the original
20210510_211848.jpg
 

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amazing work sherlock, i can't wait to see it all together and running.
 
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Discussion Starter · #218 ·
Hey guys, spoiler alert; Impala is running and driving but yesterday was a tough day for it and you might be able to help.
I spent most of the month of June traveling, and then needed a break from the Impala so I started tearing apart my Roadmaster wagon. I drove the Impala yesterday to work after it had been sitting for about 45 days. AGM battery, bought February 2020, disconnected the whole time I was traveling, trickle charged up before I drove it. Weird issues:
  1. AC compressor not engaging. Checked AC pressure at home, 105psi, so it hasn't leaked out at all.
  2. Drove to work fine; on the way to lunch, transmission lost power, ABS light came on, and tach went dead. No MIL.
  3. Started up the car after lunch, drove fine for a few shifts, then transmission lost power again and tach went dead. I limped it back to work.
  4. After work I went out to drive home and the battery was dead.
  5. Got a jumpstart, drove it home with 2nd and 3rd gear (still no tach, ABS light on, no MIL).
  6. Parked it at home for several hours. Battery reading 10.6V. Put my smart charger on it, it tried for a bit and then said the battery has an internal open circuit. Battery would only charge at 9 amps even though I put it on 15 amp mode.
  7. Disconnected the charger, started up the car and put it into the garage. 1st gear was operational, tach was working, MIL was on. I did not have time to scan for codes, nor drive it to see if the trans would lose power again.

I'm going to let it sit at home today, then check the battery tonight and replace it if it's low. It should be stated that this battery has sat in this car, hooked up, for a month at a time and started right up afterwards. Any other ideas welcome.
 

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I know you know this, but starting with a known good battery wouldn't be a bad first step.

What brand of battery is it?

I've heard plenty of horror stories about Optima batteries...

I personally run a 1/3 sized Odyssey PC680 AGM battery laid flat in the stock location for the last 5 years or so now. Only 170 CCA but works great and less than half the weight of a stock sized battery if you care about that stuff. Only hitch is having to throw it on the charger in the winter if it's been sitting for a few weeks in the sub-freezing garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #220 ·
It's an Autocraft Platinum. I'll get another battery and go from there.
 
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