Chevy Impala SS Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Because it would break my bank doing the whole car at one time, planning on doing sections at a time. System consist of 12s in the trunk, 6 1/2" components in the door and rear deck, where should I start first?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,949 Posts
I'd look into the tiles from Sound Deadener Showdown instead of plastering the whole car with Fatmat. I bought a roll of Fatmat years ago and used it, it's better than nothing but heavy and you need a lot of it, if I were to do a full system again I'd look in to the mass loaded vinyl from SDS instead of asphalt/butyl based products like Fatmat/Dynomat etc. It costs more per square foot but you use a lot less of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
But where to start applying it first since I'm doing it in stages?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,949 Posts
Probably front doors and rear deck first to eliminate rattles and dampen any effect the surrounding materials have on the speakers. It would be best to seal up any large areas on the front door, these cars are enough enough the panels are likely to crack in a few spots too, put something on the back of the door panels too. Trunk lid will probably need a little for the subs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,949 Posts
Thanks, that's what I was wanting to know. Looking at using this brand of matting, any thoughts?
https://gtsoundcontrol.com/shop/GTMAT-110-MIL/
Personally I wouldn't buy it since it's asphalt based, basically the same thing as Grace Ice Shield used for roofing. I've used similar things in the past and while it's better than nothing, it's messy, heavy, and smells. It's also more prone to failure as it'll harden and crack over time. I had a roll of Fatmat (basically the same thing) that I used some of on my old Caprice, fortunately I never put it on my Impala. I used a little bit in my TL just since I still had it but the mass loaded vinyl stuff is the way to go these days. I would definitely look into http://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com/, might cost more but you'll use a lot less, their tiles are supposed to only be used on 25% of the surface you want covered instead of covering everything you can with a layer or two with the asphalt stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks, might get enough tile for one door and see how well it performs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
i ordered and did my own trunk. just tapping on the fender from the outside with my knuckle sounds like a "thunk-thunk". no rattle, and hardly noticeable from the outside. unless i really turn it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Anything dampening is better than nothing :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,421 Posts
Ok lets look at it this way.


You have external vibration/noise producing areas: Firewall, floor pans (due to exhaust and drivetrain).


You have areas that the speakers are mounted: You don't want some of the speakers noise waves being absorbed by the body panels causing rattle

You have large flat and semi flat areas: These are most prone to vibratory noises both externally (road noise) and internally (engine, speakers)



Of these areas, depending on the options on your car (9c1 vs. SS vs. Caddy) some of them already have some degree of factory applied sound deadener or barrier. To the best of my knowledge the firewall of all B and D body cars of our era is internally shielded by a foam/rubberized barrier that is under the dash. Some of them have a firewall pad on the inside of the engine bay which is additional barrier. Every B/D-body I have seen has some degree of floor pan deadener, its usually not very thick, sparsely used and sometimes peeling off due to age. Floor pans also have a jute pad, that looks like fabric made by nesting rats. Doors usually only have some jute pad, some of the D-bodies have a very thin rubberized barrier.


So if budget is a concern and you wanted to apply deadener in a sequence that gets the most results first. Then the first order of the day should be to verify to some degree the condition of the pre-existing factory applied barrier and deadener. These area's were deemed important enough to require deadening that the factory used it, and they do not like using heavy expensive deadener. Also check your door seals, these cars have a number of seals and wind blocking pieces of material that are really cheap and easy noise protection.

Secondly, and the primary area I would attack if the factory stuff is all in place, is the front doors. They are BIG flattish pieces of metal that the factory did not really deaden very well. They can easily vibrate with bass and road noise.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top