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Discussion Starter #1
My new front speed sensors have a different looking magnetic pick up on them. Is this an issue? I’m talking about the shape of the metal tip coming off the sensor.
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Discussion Starter #4
I installed both front left and right sensors, plugged them in. Started my car and the ABS light is still on.

💭Does anyone know if the ABS has a fuse anywhere? Or, why my ABS light is still on and how I can track the issue? I’m going to check the rear sensor tomorrow to see what shape it’s in and maybe clean it up. Other than that, I’d be pleased to hear from people as I would like to get this ABS light to turn off.

💭Does anyone know how to check the 3 sensor harness (vehicle side) with a volt meter?

💭Does anyone know if the ABS light is supposed to shut off immediately after the sensor repairs for example, or is there some sort of trick to reset. I disconnected the positive terminal while I put the wheel back on for about 5 minutes. That didn’t do the trick.

Thanks.
 

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Never delved into other years than my 91. FMS states, you can only pull codes as long as the abs light goes out. That's always been mine behavior. Turn key on, lights up, and shortly goes out. I have another bad sensor now. It only triggers the light only after car moves a few feet. If it come on and stays on, you probably have controller issue. Unless newer ones are diff. I'll look at the 95's manual when i get home and have a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
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I wonder if all that matter gooped and stuck to the end of the rear sensor has any effect on my ABS light. I read Goldwagons write up on the ABS system and also read the FSM a tad bit last night. The way I understand, the ABS light will come on immediately if the system does not check ok after it checks itself. Furthermore, if it does not check itself good, it will shut itself (ABS system) down until the problem is corrected. Don’t count on what I said here though I’m not 100 percent sure. And, as far as codes go, I’m reading I need a Tech 1 code reader to pull ABS codes and also clear them. Codes can be cleared by cycling the ignition key to on 100 times. lol, I tried that. My hand and mind was tired of counting. I’m not sure if the 100 cycle times includes letting the Air Bag light blink out for whatever seconds also which I didn’t do. I just did the fuel pump and yellow dash lights that go off immediately whatever they are. I forgot.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Impressive. Soak that in solvent and see if it's mostly metal. Or just dirty (never changed) lube. You're in deep enough to just go get a reader. Cheap like this, or up to $10x more. Or a close friend with one for OBD1.
I sprayed sensor cleaner on it and metal dust was stuck to it. The sensor had a couple dings or abrasions on the side of the cylinder (side of sensor if you will). Anyway, It was metal mixed in with dirty oil. Sprayed the dirty oil away and metal dust had to be removed with a rag and repeat until clean.

About the code reader on Amazon. Are you sure that thing will read ABS codes on my 1995 Impala SS? I’ve had a cheap reader from Autozone and it didn’t work. All it would do is turn my fans on. I heard on 95’s, code readers don’t work. Can tell me if it’s not going to be a waste of my money? Because I been wondering how I’m going to pull codes. The tech 1 reader is like 400-500 dollars. That’s rediculous. Not even: My ABS light is still on after cleaning sensor. I traced the cable and nothing looks bad. The cable goes into the floor pan plug on drivers side if I’m correct.
 

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....Are you sure that thing will read ABS codes on my 1995 Impala SS? .....
No. Not sure at all. Just offering a way to clear the roadblock. You'd need to search on here a bit to see what others have found that works.



...... I traced the cable and nothing looks bad. ......
Decades ago I bought brandnew oem replacements for 2 sensors that went bad almost the same time, and after going batsh(ii)t for a week I did a simple check and found one was bad right out of the bag. Re-replacement and all better. Maybe a simple continuity check on those 2 news ones? And even the 3rd one in the rear? It seems the tiniest debris or nick can kill a lead over time.

Otherwise, have you considered hunting down a FSM? Mine has saved me $Cs in parts, $Ms in wasted time, and $MMs in stress.

Question: this has been nagging me since I caught your OP. Is that oem style tip sensor more than 6 months old? I've NEVER heard one any older ever coming out of the hole intact considering how they weld themselves in from the expanded rusted metal dust.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Decades ago I bought brandnew oem replacements for 2 sensors that went bad almost the same time, and after going batsh(ii)t for a week I did a simple check and found one was bad right out of the bag. Re-replacement and all better. Maybe a simple continuity check on those 2 news ones? And even the 3rd one in the rear? It seems the tiniest debris or nick can kill a lead over time.

Otherwise, have you considered hunting down a FSM? Mine has saved me $Cs in parts, $Ms in wasted time, and $MMs in stress.

Question: this has been nagging me since I caught your OP. Is that oem style tip sensor more than 6 months old? I've NEVER heard one any older ever coming out of the hole intact considering how they weld themselves in from the expanded rusted metal dust.
Yeah, I hear you and thanks for trying to open the roadblock. I have the FSM. I’m going to start checking continuity on the three sensors. There is a write up by somebody named Goldwagon. It talks about how many ohms they are supposed to be. I’m not sure if it’s the vehicle side or the sensor side.

Answer to your question: “this has been nagging me since I caught your OP. Is that oem style tip sensor more than 6 months old? I've NEVER heard one any older ever coming out of the hole intact considering how they weld themselves in from the expanded rusted metal dust.”———A: The sensors that were on my car, the old ones I removed that you are referring to are almost 10 (ten) years old. Maybe the original? I can’t say, but that’s when I purched the vehicle used around 2010. I could not pull the sensor out by hand from the back. But, using a socket from behind that nearly clears the Inner diameter of the sensor hole, after removing the rotors, tapping the sensor out was a piece of cake.
 

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An OBD1 reader of any flavor will not be able to read codes on the ABS system. They are independant. If you are stuck, go to the dealer and simply ask them to diagnose the problem (for a fee). Turning the car on and off 100 times will just wear out the key and switch ... the ABS failure will clear if the ABS system is repaired. It does not keep the light on for any longer than it takes to fix it.

Problems with the ABS computer / motor cannot really be fixed by typical wrenching, though it rarely fails. The typical fault is with the wiring or sensor. One of the tests the ABS system does when powered up is to check the resistance of the sensors. I'm thinking somewhere around 2K ohms (but that's from memory, so check that). If out of range, it sets the light. It also pulses the brake system ever so slightly to verify some operation or other. You can actually feel that if you are perceptive. That failure will also set the ABS light.

Your condition of your differential sensor is somewhat worrisome. Differential fluid should not turn gooey, even stuck on a sensor. You might (at some point) want to pull the diff cover and check, drain, and change the fluid. Metal particles in the diff are not actually that common, unless there are wear issues. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
An OBD1 reader of any flavor will not be able to read codes on the ABS system. They are independant. If you are stuck, go to the dealer and simply ask them to diagnose the problem (for a fee). Turning the car on and off 100 times will just wear out the key and switch ... the ABS failure will clear if the ABS system is repaired. It does not keep the light on for any longer than it takes to fix it.

Problems with the ABS computer / motor cannot really be fixed by typical wrenching, though it rarely fails. The typical fault is with the wiring or sensor. One of the tests the ABS system does when powered up is to check the resistance of the sensors. I'm thinking somewhere around 2K ohms (but that's from memory, so check that). If out of range, it sets the light. It also pulses the brake system ever so slightly to verify some operation or other. You can actually feel that if you are perceptive. That failure will also set the ABS light.

Your condition of your differential sensor is somewhat worrisome. Differential fluid should not turn gooey, even stuck on a sensor. You might (at some point) want to pull the diff cover and check, drain, and change the fluid. Metal particles in the diff are not actually that common, unless there are wear issues. Good luck.
Thanks for the reply. I’ve read your post and agree with what you are saying. As for going to the dealer and having them run ABS scan that will be a last resort. I already have discovered 2 problems in the rear end case.

1. The sensor is not showing any resistance which indicates it can’t be operational.

2. The reluctor gear in the rear end case is not moving with the drive shaft as I inspected. I turned the drive shaft by hand, and while looking in the hole with a mirror at the reluctor gear, it stays still. I think I tried this in neutral and drive. From personal opinion, with no FSM or factual backing, I believe from personal opinion that the reluctor gear should turn with the drive yolk at any given time. I think something may be jammed in between somehow. Correct me if I’m wrong. Notes : There was a piece of the differential stuck to the magnet about over an inch and a half long. Photos in previous post. The gear oil looked really contimated, dark, with metal (smaller) stuck all over the magnet. It could have been low on gear oil as well. It only filled just about 1/3rd of a milk gallon. Not sure how much that is as to the correct value per FSM operational amount.

End notes: I’m pulling my rear end myself soon. Waiting for new rear sensor to arrive by postage. Going to do a test by plugging new rear sensor in to see if ABS light turns off. (Front 2 sensors are newly installed last week) Not going to run new sensor in axle case until rear ended is rebuilt.
 

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It's always entertaining (well, for us on this side tryna' guess what's up, but not you having to live through hell) when more detail and background comes to light. At this point really wondering any more you can add. I mighta' missed it, but what prompted replacing both fronts at the same time to start with? How long you been without ABS in the first place? 135k is hardly any miles for our car, so how'd the reluctor go lame? How long have you had the car, and any rear work in its history?
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
First, I want to thank all of you for helping me on this post.

I’m starting a new post on my rear end rebuild soon. I will attempt to do it myself on my property. I am politely asking furthermore and would appreciate some input from people who know how it’s done while I do the rebuild. I’ve done hours of reading and watching trustful media on how rear ends are rebuilt. I worked as a lead man machinist in the past at a bearing manufacture. I used to finish machine (grind) bearings on all dimensions furthermore size matching raceway diameters to fit certain ball and roller diameter spreads to obtain correct radial play. After reading and watching video’s, I’m having a pretty clear understanding of:
1. Pinion depth
2. Ring gear backlash
3. The relationship of “pinion gear depth” to “position of healthy operational contact point of teeth on pinion and ring gear. (Brushed on yellow stuff)...Where it’s supposed to be
4. Spacing of shims on sides of differential carrier between carrier bearings and case to correct backlash of ring gear to pinion- to FSM spec. Need understanding of how tight the carrier should be between the shims though. No play obviously understood as backlash should not change or shift side to side (left right). I’m guessing the correct backlash and the shims that fit the tightest without exceeding preload is the ticket.
5. Test bearings vs depth guage for setup of pinion gear shim selection.
* I know the honing of the inner diameter (bore) of the pinion gear bearings makes for a slide fit of the two bearings onto the pinion gear shaft. This all to position pinion depth and “remove bearings easily” if I need pinion depth change by a pinion shim change.
* I know the pinion depth guage is used to obtain pinion depth without installing the carrier and testing with the gear tooth paint and dis assembling to add or subtract shims to achieve the sweet spot with the paint. (Heel, toe, peak, valley etc. if you will) note: Peak and valley moreso involves carrier spacing shims if pinion depth is correct.

Question: Using a pinion depth guage or not, “is it essential to use a pair of set up bearings (honed I.D)?”

I mean, I am figuring right now that even using a pinion depth guage the end result of pinion depth may need to be corrected and using a non pressed set of bearings will still benefit the builder. Unless there is a way of adding some sort of stack height (shim+ pinion gear width from face seats+ pinion depth to center line of carrier axis. <<<<let me know.

Question: If I purchase an Eaton posi differential or any “non stock” carrier differential, does the pinion depth still match the FSM spec?

Question: if I purchase a non factory gear set, for example a 3:42 or 3:73, does the new pinion gear depth change from the FSM? I’m guessing that the diameter of the pinion gear itself gets smaller and the ring gear diameter gets larger so YES the pinion depth changes and a number needs to be added or subtracted to the FSM spec along with the number attached to any specific pinion gear. In other words, pinion depth consist of 1. The with of the shim, pinion gear, pinion depth AND the shift of the pinion itself that takes place when a larger carrier diff ring is installed? Is this true?? This is all what I need to know which way to set up my rear end will be better-using a depth guage or not.
*Im guessing using a depth guage would be easier with rebuilding my rear end with an identical auburn and stock size pinion gear and ring gear pair and starting with my old shim.
*Im guessing not using a depth guage would be easier in the sense of not having to add all those numbers up and formulating pinion depth with aftermarket ratio change to the 3:42 or 3:73 (whatever it is if you will). This being if pinion depth changes from the FSM drastically with new ratios. I’m guessing it does since a larger ring would be going in-this resulting in a larger number in the depth reading from the centerline of the carrier.


⚙ Finally the reluctor ring gear that interacts with the ABS sensor. I need to know what reluctor ring goes with what “pinion gear and carrier ring set”. And, of the same importance. If the reluctor ring that goes with any particular “pinion gear and carrier ring—set” fits with any chosen carrier differential being an Eaton for example.

End note/s: My vehicle is going to be driven on the street as a regular driver. So, that being said, I hear Eaton differentials are for straight drag type driving and they can have cornering problems and make noise. I’m not saying they are not good parts. I’m saying I don’t want to pay for High performance parts to have my car making rear end noise because I went to Walmart. Further explanation is this. I hear just about everyone wanting a better than stock Auburn or recommending something other than an Auburn like an Eaton, Tru Trac, Locker, Yukon. Whatever it is... It don’t really matter. I may not be naming the correct names. What I’m saying is this. All I want is a reliable rear end with a gear change ratio. And no problems because I put something in my car that has no purpose as a daily tip driving city application. My example was an Eaton. I’ve read they are good but the reason is for the strip. My Auburn is 130k old I’m guessing. I don’t want any Eaton problems after 4 thousand miles because I don’t drag race and want to have an Eaton like everyone else. You see my point. Now if a performance carrier “differential” other than an Auburn is going to last longer than an 3:42 or 3:73 ratio with an new Auburn replacement, let me know and what it is. What I’m asking is this: Is it going to be a mistake rebuilding my rear end with a stock carrier and 3:42 or 3:72 ratio? If like what people say, “3:42 and 3:73 are easier on transmission life” wouldn’t a stock Auburn have a longer life with the gear ratio change also? Let me know.

So what combo of parts should I buy? I know there is a whole bunch of information out there but I’m skeptical about asking questions on post that are so old as people may not respond wasting my time and putting extra stress on me. Although I am utilizing that information, anyone can’t be mad at me For wanting answers to my specific case.

Sorry for the long post. But this is where I needed to start. I will be copying and pasting this as an intro to my new rear end rebuild done by me thread in the drive train section of the forum. Please feel welcome to participate in my first rear end rebuild. I can appreciate and am probably going to need some honest true facts and direction.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It's always entertaining (well, for us on this side tryna' guess what's up, but not you having to live through hell) when more detail and background comes to light. At this point really wondering any more you can add. I mighta' missed it, but what prompted replacing both fronts at the same time to start with? How long you been without ABS in the first place? 135k is hardly any miles for our car, so how'd the reluctor go lame? How long have you had the car, and any rear work in its history?
Thanks for the reply. As to an answer to your question “what prompted replacing both fronts at the same time to start with? I replaced both fronts to start with because this: I bought the car about 10 years ago. I can’t remember if the ABS light was on or not because the passkey was on. I’m guessing the ABS was on and the previous owner told me it was only because the 24 inch wheels or it only needed a sensor. Something like that. I didn’t know about ABS as much then as I do now. Anyway, a long while back, I discovered when I changed my front brakes one day, air found my 24 inch rim edge cut my drivers side sensor cable where it routes along the frame. This cut happening as I do U turns or turn sharp. While I’m answering, the inside of the rim also cut a groove in my front sway bar on the passenger side. I’m guessing that after the groove got deeper on the passenger side sway bar, the inside of the rim got closer to the sensor cable on the drivers side. I’m not sure as I don’t see any grooves on the drivers side cable cut side at the time. Maybe the rubber of the tire grabbed the cable and cut it. If I remember correctly, the rubber may have cut the cable enough to expose that the cable itself was cut through one of the two wires inside this sensor cable. Long story short, I
One day I just that sensor wire all the way back so it wasn’t dangling and went to the other side and cut it as well with plans to replace both of them in the future. So here I am. My choice to cut the other sensor cable is to just replace both at the same time so. It probably saves people money to change one sensor at a time, but for me running two new same brand sensors that are the same age is just better in my eyes. I’m not rich, it’s just what I think. It’s funny though, that both of my old front cut sensors still pick up resistance on my volt meter. They would probably still work of new plugs were connected to them. I kept them.

And for the reluctor gear going bad at 135k answer. I don’t know if it is still good or not, but as I been informed, that reluctor gear is supposed to spin with the drive shaft at all times. Mine is not I believe. Why? I looked in the sensor hole with a mirror and light. I then turned the driveshaft slowly with wheels in neutral and drive. (I think reluctor is supposed to spin with drive shaft no matter what gear). In other words, if the drive shaft moves so does the reluctor. If this is true, that my reluctor is staying still while the drive shaft is moving, then my guess is a chunk of metal from somewhere in my rear end jumped up in between and got jammed between the reluctor and something causing it to be frozen and not doing it’s job. It may still function if it moved with the shaft but it also looks like the teeth are chipped from something getting jammed between its gears and the sensor. The sensor casing is chewed up too.
 

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Thank you for the background and details. I have to admit though the instant my eyes happened on that 24" thing, that the realization of cause for all your combined problems hit me as bright and loud as lighting a match in a fireworks factory. Offsetting any visual attraction the strain on the entire drivetrain with bigwheels represents a hefty financial and performance cost, and regrettably too often catastrophic failures you've had. I ain't never done a rear, so can't offer much help with your dialing in one. I caught your other threads and you've already gotten excellent hints and heeds from those who know, and I applaud your gumption tackling it. I can only add that this better not be your driver, in order that you can take care to study every step 10 times, - and redo every one 10 more times. ;)
 
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