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1996 BBB
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Looks nice a nice kit. They used to sell these I believe with QA1 stuff which would be a downgrade compared to a high quality coil/shock setup like hotchkis and konis IMO but good for the drag track maybe. Don't know how those ride tech coil overs perform but I am willing to bet it probably isn't worth the cost.

The chassis mount sway bar sounds like a great idea, but again....I haven't seen anyone compare this to a well matched aftermarket sway bar mounted factory style so I can't say for sure if it is worth it.

As far as the arms themselves, they look nice but there are other brands that make similar arms. Here are issues you'd want to address to make for a great trailing arm setup for our cars:

Stiffness- obviously most boxed or tubular structures accomplish this. A boxed clevis probably beats a bent 1/2" plate ones like some other brands use but I doubt you'll see a difference

Articulation- this can be accomplished by using a spherical style joint on one side and a poly/delrin/rubber bushing on the other. You probably want to stay away from anything that uses poly on both ends as it is a recipe for bind unless you can ASSURE the arm only moves straight up and down in it's range of motion and is never side loaded which I don't think would be the case in a triangulated 4 link.

ANGLE OF UPPER CLEVIS- this is an important one with extended arms. When extending the arms, YOU CHANGE THE ANGLE THAT THE CLEVIS MEETS THE HOUSING BUSHINGS. The best way to correct this is to offset the clevis as a few brands do. This way, you meet the bushing square thus reducing abnormal wear as well as bind. This is important and I personally wouldn't buy any aftermarket arm that doesn't do this.

Last but not least, joint type- as already mentioned, you're going to want one side to be a spherical bushing on each arm. Not all area created equally, different brands make different joints (Curry has its Johnny Joint, UMI has its Roto Joint) . Do some research as to which seem to last longest under typical street conditions, which are cheaper/easier to rebuild etc...
 

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1996 BBB
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2,576 Posts
While I am not going to say NOT to do the speed tech kit, as I have installed some VERY nice quality parts from them. I would just say to keep in mind that something like the following setup has been proven to work well-

Tubular or boxed control arm with a spherical joint on one end and poly/rubber/delrin on the other. Offset clevis on the upper arms with rubber bushings in the axle housing (poly if desired but I am still on the fence about that personally).

DMR triangulation bars (this help to keep the rear crossmember and upper/lower control arm mounting points rigid and tied together).

RMS style bar welded in between the rear frame rails (also helps keep the rear X member from distorting).

Well matched set of shocks/springs/swaybar.

In my opinion that is probably the best you can do with our setup short of adding a panhard bar like ProTools has done or ideally a WATTS link setup to really help control the rear but then you are talking about some custom fab work. Something like that would really step you up into another league though and I have no doubt you'll end up with much better handling characteristics as a result. A watts link would be the ultimate, completely keeping the rear centered without bind and allowing the upper control arms to do the duty of controlling pinion angle only.
 
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