Chevy Impala SS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I was searching around looking for information on spools in our cars and did find much. I want to know how much different it is on the street, like for daily use. I understand that it will not allow the rear wheels to spin at different speeds and will make maneuvering more difficult. How much harder will it be to turn and how much wider will the turns be over an open diff or LSD? I'm looking for a cheap and reliable way to lock both my axles most/all of the time.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
A spool is much lighter in weight that a traditional center section.
They are very durable and cheap!
Many years ago I had a 9" rearend in a 69 Camaro with a Spool - It would occasionally get driven 'er raced on the street.....

Older / (verdict out on smarter now) but I would not recommend it - l car did not want to turn especially with drag skinnies on the front and 10.5" slicks on the back.

If the car is primarily drag raced i would recomend an Eaton.
If primarily auto crossed or road raced get a Detroit Tru-Trac.

Leave the spolls for trailored Drag cars and go fast turn left dirt cars!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Also good luck with a spool if the car ever shuts off and you need to push it. If you have to push it you are now not only fighting the weight of the car but if you're turning the car you are now fighting the tire sticking to the ground because it wont rotate to make it easy to turn
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,870 Posts
whats the advantages of having as spool instead of a posi?

I'll try to answer a couplw questions and clear up a couple other things. The advantage to having a spool is that you are not constantly worried if only one tire is spinning in the burn out that will lead to burning up the posi unit. If you are using 28" or taller slicks, this is a real issue. And they are lighter. The notion that they are cheap is not true. When installing a spool in our cars, you also have to install c-clip eliminators and machine the housing for them to fit. I have a spool and I really like it for what I do with my car. I do drive it on the street, but not very much and never in the rain or snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,824 Posts
I'm sure mini spools will pop up at you now and then when looking for spools. Think of just removing the spider gears in an open diff, and dropping in a sleeve with splines at both end, to grab each axle, and then a pin going thru it, to hook it to the carrier. Problem with that is, you run the risk of cracking the carrier. The end effect is the same as a spool, just cheaper, with more faults/weak points. It's basically the same point as welding the spider gears together, like they do on trail rigs. But if the welds let go at highway speeds, and jamed the ring/pinion, that would make for a very dangerous stop. There are alot of guys out there who daily drive trucks with a "Lincoln Locker. Aka, welde spider gears, by a Lincoln welder.


I have been looking into "Lunch box Lockers", while looking into things for my Jeep, and have tossed around this idea of using a Powertrax Lock Right, or Aussie Locker, in my Roadmaster for a cheap winter "posi". But first I will be trying them in my Jeep.

I know there is a 60k Auburn posi from an Impala For Sale in the FS section, for around $130 shipped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
I'll try to answer a couplw questions and clear up a couple other things. The advantage to having a spool is that you are not constantly worried if only one tire is spinning in the burn out that will lead to burning up the posi unit. If you are using 28" or taller slicks, this is a real issue. And they are lighter. The notion that they are cheap is not true. When installing a spool in our cars, you also have to install c-clip eliminators and machine the housing for them to fit. I have a spool and I really like it for what I do with my car. I do drive it on the street, but not very much and never in the rain or snow.

im bringing this one back ..... so what do u think about doing a full spool on a non daily driven car? it will be street driven but not daily?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,115 Posts
Get used to this sound............

Chirp Chrip Chirp Chirp (incase you didnt know thats your tires making a chirping sound when going around a corner because the tires are fully locked)

My dad had that on his 69 camaro, but it was far from a DD, just occasional sat. nights. But honestly he didnt keep it long, he had got tired of it.


Spools are realy drag only. Period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Get used to this sound............

Chirp Chrip Chirp Chirp (incase you didnt know thats your tires making a chirping sound when going around a corner because the tires are fully locked)

My dad had that on his 69 camaro, but it was far from a DD, just occasional sat. nights. But honestly he didnt keep it long, he had got tired of it.


Spools are realy drag only. Period.
ooo im used to the sound i got the 67 camaro that im sure has a full spool.... witch i did actully drive that thing for 3 months str8 about 2 years ago and that was including waking up at 5am to go to school rain or shine.... i was just curious about how it would be in the caprice

some one mentioned id have to upgrade the axels the stock ones wouldnt last long with a spool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
If you daily drive it I wouldn't recommend it. Not only is it harder to turn it wears on your tires pretty bad. It just makes it not fun to drive IMO.


the caprice will not be daily driven at that point.... my tires wear out quite fast anywho lol

im waiting on a deal for a very cheap pickup and i will keep the caprice as another toy witch is when ill decided what to do for rear... if that truck doesnt work out i may very well just sell the caprice n invest in a beater n put the rest into the 67
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,870 Posts
im bringing this one back ..... so what do u think about doing a full spool on a non daily driven car? it will be street driven but not daily?

When I do drive my car on the steet, the spool doesn't even cross my mind. I don't hear the chirps: maybe I'm not turning sharp enough. And, believe it or not, I still have the factory axles in my car as do many others that hit the tire pretty hard. I think GM knew this was a 4000 lb car that may get souped up :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
When I do drive my car on the steet, the spool doesn't even cross my mind. I don't hear the chirps: maybe I'm not turning sharp enough. And, believe it or not, I still have the factory axles in my car as do many others that hit the tire pretty hard. I think GM knew this was a 4000 lb car that may get souped up :)

So ur going 10.5's with I belive some one mentiond 1.3sec 60's on stock axels my god...... so with the full spool the axels should hold up fine specially if ur not making insaine power and with the mini spools id need c clip emliminators?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
The mini spool does not require c-clip eliminators. However, it does require an OPEN carrier. (the thing the ring gear bolts to) It won't install in a posi unit.


Ok I had it all backwards but the stock axels will be fine
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,870 Posts
They are all I have ever run. I've had a spare setting here for 5 years collecting dust. I am sure alot of others also use the stock axles. To be sure, however, any axle can break, GM or aftermarket. I am not endorsing GM over any other brand, just saying they work for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,870 Posts
You have to cut about 1/4" off the ends of the housing: that's where your axle seal goes now and once removed, you can't go back. And, some material has to be removed from the bracket that attaches the caliper to the housing so that the caliiper can then be in the right position to work properly. It's hard to explain and something you can see right away when making the change. (you do this last) The ones I do, I drill holes for tapping 1/4" bolts through the backing plates and into the axle housing flange , countersink the holes in the backing plate for countersunk bolts, use a sealer and bolt the backing plates onto the housing. This makes it much easier to seal and bolt the axles in later. It's not terribly hard, but it's not easy either.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top