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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Of course I seem to have every size other than the one's I need.

So to confirm before I buy the incorrect thing again since I can't seem to find the sizes on the forums

What size socket for the pitman arm to the steering box (I tried a 32mm did not fit, highest size I have)

Edit, looks like a 33mm hopefully:

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What size flare nut wrench for the lines?

I tried a 17mm flare nut wrench, too small, I tried a 19mm flare nut wrench, too big. And of course I don't have an 18mm in the toolbox, is 18mm the correct size? My new lee powering steering box has a 19mm bolt capping the lines off so I'm hoping that isn't an issue.

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Line nuts are both 18mm, attachment bolts are 15mm. You can reach the line nuts from between the frame and wheelhouse, 1 flat at a time. You must pull the outer one to get to the inner, and assembly is the reverse. Put new O-rings on the lines.
You need a puller for the Pittman arm, and an impact wrench for the nut. It has a keyed spline. The Pittman arm does not like to come off. I have had an instance where I had to remove the gearbox from the car to get the arm off.
Make sure you do not have any play in the box before installing it. If you are going to adjust the input shaft, make sure you turn it from left to right for center to make the worm gear pull the shaft into the box, or you will not get an accurate adjustment.
 
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While 15mm ( thought it was 16 ) might fit your mounting bolts mine are sae us bolts with 5/8 heads .

" Line nuts are both 18mm"
Not in my experience, maybe yours are but, the return line hex is typically smaller.
 

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The mounting bolts may well be 5/8". The threads on the line nuts are different, but the heads are the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was able to get the lines from through the engine bay, first line was quite accessible, the second line, the 18mm crows foot couldn't wrap around it since the edge was hitting the wall thingy that is around the PCM, and if that can't wrap around I don't think a regular line wrench would unless it's like thin. For that an open ended 18 mm wrench might have to be the way to go, though if you do strip the nut then that's a problem. I was still able to get it out from the top of the engine bay from this PoV

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(Yeesh those control arm bushings 🤢)

The pitman nut I did use a 1 5/16, I tried a 33mm socket also, they both had a bit of play, the issue is I bought a 33m socket with a 1 inch drive for some stupid stupid reason 😂

However it came it without any fuss or any visible rounding on the nut.

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Next up is to remove the pitman arm from the box using the puller, I pray it comes out easy.
 

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The mounting bolts may well be 5/8". The threads on the line nuts are different, but the heads are the same.
As you say the threads are different with the pressure being 18 -1.5 and return 16- 1.5
Where is where it gets interesting,
Pressure hex 18mm as we all agree.
Return hex's vary it seems .
I have both 16 and 18 mm right here.
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I do not have my car here handy and it would not matter anyway as Custom fabbed the lines and know it is NOW 16 hex.
The 18 hex return I have here is a 95 9C1 so the range of our cars may very well be 18mm hex return , as you say, Fred
Note: 16 mm = .630 vs 5/8 = .625
Wrench and nut hex tolerances , pretty much a wash.

So ,
1 5/16 socket
5/8 socket
A good 18 tube wrench on hand
and a 5/8 (edit typo) tube wrench (16mm ) in case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ouch didn't realize I'd need more tools. Few days for the things to arrive.

Based on threads I went through seems like this is the one for the pitman arm removal from the steering box, I've read the cheaper ones are hit and miss.
OTC 8150 Conical Pitman Arm Puller

As for the o-rings part number this one seems to be it, I am not replacing the lines currently
General Motors, SEAL, 26001594

And for the fluid change, this is the part number recommended by lee, though I should have probably bought some of their fluid with their gearbox at the time but a bit late for that.
ACDELCO 105073

Still cheaper than having a shop do it I suppose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Got the tool, ended up being a bit more annoying because of the sway bar hitting the tool, and since I ran a bolt through the frame for my sway bar mounts getting that one driver side bolt head held in place was a pain but eventually got it just loose enough where I could squeeze the tool through.

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Once the tool was through it was easy work, though anytime there's so much pressure on something I'm always pooping my pants, pretty much the reason why I despise working on things like separating balljoints and what not.

Still this tool was worth the bucks, did spray it down with some lube also.

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Now I just need to disconnect the steering shaft, and remove the three bolts and it should come out but taking a break.

I also need to drain all the fluid before I install the new box since there's a disclaimer of not running old fluid in the steering box in case of contamination, the methods I read require turning the steering wheel which means the box is attached so I'm not sure how to drain the system without the box attached, do I just run the car and the pump will squirt out fluid? Sorry I'll do some reading on it just haven't got to that part yet.

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You can run the car with the pressure line in a bucket as you pour fluid in the res.
It is almost a 3 man job though.
One to start and shut off so the pump never runs dry
One to pour the fluid
The third guy to hold the hose because it invariably flips out of the bucket !!!!

If you have a 90° drill and a piece of hex ( like a piece of an allen wrench ) you can pull the belt and run the pump at a much less frantic pace.

Most GM cars with front steer it is often much easier to drop the swap bar and fish the box in and out from the bottom
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yea most likely going with the same method hopefully no clearance issues, I got people that could help out, just don't trust them enough and rather not screw it up. 😂

Since I have the line disconnected at the box and with the hard line curved downwards I should be able to get like a hose and aim it into a bucket, then watch reservoir and fill till new fluid comes out the other end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
So pretty much got everything removed, except for the steering shaft stuck to the gear box, Should I be trying to pry it where the shaft meets the box or some other method (circled in blue), I don't think I have anything skinny and strong enough to fit.

Problem is there doesn't seem to be anywhere else to pry on it to collapse it.


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I could remove the sway bar completely however I'm just a bit sketched tugging on the gearbox with nothing to break the fall, if it slips out of my hands somehow that'll send me to the hospital.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Tried again today and it just came out, but yea it'd be easier taking the sway bar out for sure so I suggest doing that for anyone attempting it.

I did miss one bolt that I circled in blue for anyone going through this as a guide.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This is more due to my lack of understanding so bear with me.

I have both lines disconnected at the steering box (reservoir still connected)

I disconnected the belt from the power steering pulley. I spun the pulley using a cordless drill using a 5/8 hex socket, no fluid could visibly be seen out of the lines.

I take the cap off the resevoir, and fluid immediately starts to come out of the lines, I try spinning the power steering pulley again but the rate of flow doesn't change. I guess my understanding was that with the pump spinning it would do something 😂 since all the methods of flushing have some form of the pump spinning. The resevoir seems to have completely emptied out except for a small level at the bottom of the old fluid (not sure if it may drain out overnight)

Also not sure how much old fluid is still in the lines but I think at this point I can install the new box, connect the lines, disconnected the return line at the reservoir and flush it with the fresh stuff
 
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