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Here is an old favorite of mine: Spark plug wire puller pliers. Great for getting around exhaust manifolds and other obstructions. Also great for the newer "deep well" spark plug motors. You always want to grip the boot so you pull on the connector and not just pull on the wire which can damage it. I am sure it has saved me from being burned as well. I have no idea where to get one.
 

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I won't even admit to what I paid when they were the "new hot ticket" deal on the Mac truck about 25-30 years ago.

That said, mine are a little vicious in my opinion for grabbing silicon plug boots I care about.
OK if I can get under it though
 

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"For the price compared to what I too had bought some long reach pliers year ago it's hard to beat for most people. I'm lucky. My HF store is only two miles away. If I was still using tools daily at work I might not use as many as I now have. It states they are professional. I take that as what I am now. Professional DIYer. None of my Mac, Snap-On, Matco or Craftsman tools are traumatized because of being in proximity to the HF. I feel no stigma owning them either. I did buy something I will have to report back on once I get a chance to use it. I got a coupon several weeks ago for a Titanium spool gun. So I got one. I haven't welded aluminum since 1978 and that was with gas. I'm looking forward to using it. I'll be sure to let you know how it works out.
On a side note. Gas here yesterday. $1.75 E-10

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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A vendor recently stopped by my job peddling his wares and I was able to pick up a Koul Tool push-lok install tool. I had work pay for it under the guise of a needed tool for truck repair.


Also I have the ability to make hydraulic hose. I'm not sure which direction I will go when doing my trans lines.
 

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The Autel AL539B is my new favorite tool. Generic OBD2 scanner, live data monitor, voltmeter, ohmmeter, battery/charging system analyzer, all within a sturdy case small enough to keep in my car. $100 is money well spent.
Autel AL539B
 

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The Autel AL539B is my new favorite tool. Generic OBD2 scanner, live data monitor, voltmeter, ohmmeter, battery/charging system analyzer, all within a sturdy case small enough to keep in my car. $100 is money well spent.
Autel AL539B
I looked at the link. That does look like a good buy. Autel is a good brand and that one has a lot more features than my HF or Actron obd scanners at a lower price. I'm definitely interested in it. Can you use this as a standalone multimeter, without connecting to the OBD port or the vehicle battery? One of its OBD functions is Evap System, does it provide any bi-directional comms to troubleshoot this system? Is the internal battery charged via the USB connection? Does the OBD cable and the battery test cable connect to the same connector on the meter?
 

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Made a little fixture for setting dzus fasteners with solid rivets on soft panels .
Needs some refinements but seems promising.
 

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All these hi-fallootin' contraptions make me want to show off my mad fabberkatin' skilz too. Here's the substitution for the Kent Moore tool that was freakin' $80. It's been 12 years since the rebuild but I think it was for the Input Clutch. And I see other versions online nowadays at only $40:




Next up is my fancy 'keep hacking and grinding til it works' custom plug socket for my son's project car. He was 16 and watching me the whole time cutting it up, and I sweating bullets that I might not get it to fit all of them - but alas perfection. I saw something looked sorta close years later in Summit:

 

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Thanks all. This thread is getting the traction I had hoped for. I buy lots of different tools but like the home made versions also. Too many times a tool is more than the cost of the job. Bringing our home brews into play helps keep our babes up and running. (And the wallet a little fatter)?

Hope all are well during this mess.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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While a vice, couple sockets, punch, bits of tube has served me well for years, alloy shafts were always a little dicey.
Made up lower reciever with spring loaded aligner, cross press , and a alignment dowel.

Did one today,, so much smoother and no nail biting.
 

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Hose clip pliers for the OEM hose clamps. With remote so it is easy to get to ones in tight spots. The curved jaws are great at keeping the clamp unlike slip joint pliers.

SpringHoseClampPliers1.JPG


SpringHoseClampPliers2.JPG


Speaking of slip joint pliers for those that have much older cars there is a wire hose clamp version.
WireHoseClampPliers1.JPG


WireHoseClampPliers2.JPG


WireHoseClampPliers3.JPG
 

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As promised.
Over a year ago I wrote a little about a tool that can save a bunch of money. If you haven't seen the price of a set of refurbished door panels. Get your meds ready. I'm talking about the hot stapler. I did my front door panels and it's a lot more solid. I will most likely fiberglass over the staples to make it even more sturdy. I also have a spare air dam that has a split along the mounting surface and goes almost the entire width. I will repair that too. Just to have one on hand if needed. Also think of all the rest of the interior plastic. This can be used to repair headlight buckets, bumper covers and more.
IMG_0366.JPG

This is the business end of the kit. It appears to be the same as others on the market. I think I paid about $90. That's a bit less than some of the big names that sell the same thing. Mine didn't come in a case but it all fit into a HF ammo box.
IMG_0364.JPG

Here's the staples. There are different ones for different repairs. I chose the "S" shaped ones to have a bit more surface contact. They are in the lower right corner.
IMG_0369.JPG

This is the result. Now I have to take the red handled nippers that came with the kit and trim the legs and I can continue with however I want to finish.

There are plenty of you tube videos showing it in use. You may even get more ideas.

Thanks to all replies here and keep em coming.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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I hate double spirolocks.
About the time I remember the tricks and get back into a rhythm I am on the last piston.
This time , made couple of installers.
They and a plastic molding tool, it actualy went pretty smooth, with no blood letting 😀
 

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I just use a set of aluminum jaw covers with rubber pads in a little 3.5" vise I have. Total of $10 and its worked great for 16 rods so far. The jaw pads were $4.99 on Amazon.

-Brian
 

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Yes, I get it and have used blocks with UHMW pads.
Agree not everyone NEEDS one

If you are , dealing with exotic rod materials, torque numbers sometimes that exceed 90 lbs support becomes a little more important.
That and this does make it easier to get the rod bolt stretch gauge on.

Most stuff in this thread , we don't need, but,,,,,,,,,, :)
 

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OIL PUMP PICK UP DRIVER
Before someone yells bolt on pickup,
It is an off brand build and that is not an option.

Not sure what a real one costs but having a mill and a lathe , I did my own
 

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