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Lets start a group buy and hopefully someone on here can bring their car to UMI
I'm down for a GP on this type of bar as well. I'd be willing to take my car to them but they are over 3 Hrs away.

Hopefully something gets made for the B-body and like the other GP for the "wonder bar", they would have a good amount of purchases for something like this.
 

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Any Updates?
 

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Please add me to the list
 

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Great Scot.jpg


Great Scot! Ware ya bin?
 

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Zurich and Montevideo
Both are paradise, though in truth Zurich's best days are in the past as Europe has a bleak future.
Montevideo is the present and future "life as it should be".

You would benefit if you could find (used obviously) one of those 1 1/2" solid Quickor front sway bars, both my 7 K and 8 K pound Fleetwood Limo's use them and HO/HA rear bar.
Quickor also made 1 3/8" solid F+R bars which grace my 2005 ECIRS championship Caprice, now with a 427 RWHP 383.
Either Quickor front bar without the Pro Touring Brace will only bend the front frame rails whenever they are engaged and reduce the efficacy of the bar.
Any front bar with the P-T brace will have increased roll resistance while reducing the spring rate of the front frame rails, especially when welded in. Yes,
the frame has a spring rate.
 

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I've been thinking about this concept and wanted to run another design idea past everyone. If this is hijacking the thread or in the wrong place, let me know and I'll move it or create another thread.

I like these braces because they tie the front end together left/right wise well so steering inputs don't go into flexing the frame, they actually turn the wheels. One thing I've always thought could use some improvement was the up/down strength that they add. Given how they're bolted to the swaybar mounting bolts (which are notoriously weak) and in the middle of the frame rail on a flat plate, they're not the most rigid design for improving the stiffness in the up/down direction from swaybar inputs. Now if it's welded to the frame around the perimeter like some do, that will help a lot. In my scenario (engine swap) I need this brace to be removable else I can't get the engine out (see picture of OEM swaybar vs harmonic balancer)



So the idea is to weld a pair of stubs in the sketch below to the frame in the OEM front swaybar location and then use a bolt in tie bar to hold them together. The thought being that this will be removable as necessary, but sill strong vertically due to being welded to the frame and the pipe being almost 2" in diameter. The front swaybar would bolt to the bottom of the stubs about 3" lower than before.




Conveniently enough, a 1" nut fits snugly (with a hammer :)) inside a 1 1/2" Schedule 40 pipe and the tensile area of the pipe is roughly the same as a 1" bolt so from an engineering sense, it all kind of works like it should.


Here's a sketchy sketch of what I'm thinking of...Red boxes get welded to the frame. Swaybar bolts to the bottom of the red boxes. The red connecting tube has 1" nuts welded in the ends and is held in by 1" bolts from the outside and is therefore removable.


Thoughts/comments/suggestions/feedback?
 

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You might be intentionally fitting the cx-bar as close as possible to the steering box frame connectors for maximum rigidity. But just to eliminate a less congested location, could this added bar be installed forward and up v. your last pic, and hence completely 'inside the horns' (ala just ahead of the steering housing end and clear of the idler arm mounts) ?

The 1" bolts appear more than stout enough to eliminate all spread-compression of the horns. But any 'single point' attachment that's not welded both ends would allow 'slip rotation about the axis' and torsion of the horns relative to each other under severest of flex ?

Just curious, you have standoff spacers to 'square up' the idler arm-to-frame?
 

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Do you mean something like the below in green?


It's kind of "full" in that area once everything else is installed such as electric fans, transmission cooler lines, coolant pipes, etc...



I suppose I -could- weld the whole thing in, the engine went in/out many times with the OEM swaybar in place. My thought (hope?) was that a 1" bolt at 600+ ft-lbf torque would provide enough clamp load and friction between the pipe and box (over 50,000 pounds of clamping force) that there wouldn't be much/any slip and being 2" in diameter would help resist any bending due to one frame horn moving up relative to the other. I agree that being fully welded would be best, but I'd like it to be removable if possible.

The crossmember under the engine is also reinforced with a V-shaped piece of 1/2 x 8 and a gusset. This is all fully welded to the crossmember so there's some additional stiffness there compared to stock




The steering idler arm was a mock up piece from a 90's chevy truck that I ended up not using. It's now running a Howe Racing adjustable idler that fits the frame properly.

 

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Maybe - I'd have to study a few frames first. It may resolve some problems, but cause other, unforeseen ones. Either way, it's a lot of work :).
 

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Hey FUB, In a previous post I put in a picture of my brace I made. I used 1x2 inch bar stock and weld it to the frame. I drilled and tapped it to mount the sway bar. This was based on how I thought SCOT had intended in discussions in the past. Now. If you mounted the blocks and made a bar that could bolt on to that It may "help" with your situation. I'm talking of adding a bar with some flat stock welded in that would sandwich between the blocks and the SB mount. Just be sure to remove a corresponding amount from the end link sleeves to match what you added to the frame. I got 3/8th ARP 12 point bolts to mount the SB. Thinking of this more I can imagine that due to being bolted in in the way you're suggesting, horizontal, there may be flex & twisting. Maybe not but it's early. Who let the dogs out?

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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The previous post is the 8K lbs limo with the brace (made before Pro-Touring introduced theirs) welded to the frame on both sides. Quickor 1 1/2" solid front bar and Koni Adjustables cranked all the way to full hard. Boxed and seam welded frame. Brace triangulating u+l rear control arm frame attachment points.
Rear: 1 1/2" HO/HA bar, Konis at full hard, Airlift 25lbs drivers and 30 lbs pass.
435 RWHP 383 at VIR road coarse timed better than a C-5 Corvette
Limo w/275/60-15's (when real 15" Ultra HP tires were still available) on limo only wheels widened to 15 X 8
192463
1580747436836.png
 

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As the pictures show, you could grind off the welds quickly, or use a torch.
Welding is just the optimum way to increase rigidity.
An easy illustration, bolt in the Pro-Touring brace, start the engine, get someone to turn the steering wheel while you watch the frame and steering box dance.
 
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