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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since the old thread is probably gone, and I came across a file of mine showing the part numbers, I figured I'd repost the setup.

Sway Bar: Ford YW7Z-5A772-CA
End Links: Energy Suspension 9.8125 ENS-9-8125R
Bushings: Energy Suspension 9.5157 ENS-9-5157G
3” exhaust clamps: Summit SUM-G4730 SUM-G4730

I think the above parts came to maybe $100. I ordered the sway bar new from gentryfordparts.com but any online Ford will do.

This shows the muffler clamps as the pivot/bushing mount on the axle, and the relationship of the end link to the frame. I changed mine to go into the crossbracing U-channel next to it for an even more solid mount.



Completed, you can hardly even see it's there. No loss of ground clearance.



I think this took me all of 30 minutes to install, when I originally bolted the end links into that slotted frame brace. Drilling holes into the U-channel was a bit of a chore, but was a simple task. I put the WS6 bar up front, and this 4,200 lb wagon feels more like a sport sedan.

If anybody has any questions for clarification, just post and I'll answer them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes, all credit to NGrownToNale as I'm certain it was his post which started it all.

Front WS6 bar was from a 2nd Gen. T/A. The width is perfect, but the angle where it bolts to the end link is off somewhat but still works.

When you get it all bolted to the axle and lined up, the links will want to go - nowhere. If you move then forward IIRC then you can bolt them into the slotted frame braces. If you direct them slightly rearward, they will point to this substantial U-shaped cross brace and can attach them there after drilling holes.

Yep, like $50 was all I paid for a brand new Ford C.V. rear sway bar.

As stated, the best setup is to have the sway bar suspended and pivoting on the frame, and then the end links attach to the axle housing. This is how it is on my '80 Chrysler Cordoba LS (300) rear bar. Think of how it is with the front bar.

Flat, stable handling. You'll be amazed at how easy it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Well golly I do . . . It's hard to tell in the photo, but the end link is tilted towards the front of the car to fit in that slot. It was easy enough to loosen and rotate the muffler clamp-bushing assembly rearward to get the links to line up better to where I drilled the hole in the U-channel. (I'll have to take a separate picture of that).

 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I think this is a better setup, personally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I didn't even use any flat stock between the muffler clamp and the bushing, just bolted them together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I can attest to the sturdiness of the U-channel cross brace that I drilled into for the end link attachment point. It is beefy. I did move mine from that triangular slotted corner brace just to be extra sure, but it sure seems solid.

Think about the front bar attaching point for the bushings. There are four relatively small bolts holding the bushing plate to the frame. The muffler clamps appear to be far stronger than those bolts so I would judge that the attachment of the anti-sway bar to the axle is substantial. I've checked mine and it has not rotated or shifted whatsoever. I don't baby this car in the turns, and it gets a good workout as a wagon. The rear end links are also rock solid, and sit as close to perpendicular as my eyeballs can tell.

I still think the ideal setup is as on my '80 Cordoba; the anti-sway bar is bolted to the unibody subframe above and behind the axle - less unsprung weight. The end links then attach to the same steel plate that mounts the axles and shocks to the springs. This setup is kind of the reverse of that; anti-sway bar mounted on axle and end links attach to frame. Maybe that's a different approach somebody could investigate. But rear sway bars from the Volare/Aspen/Cordoba body years are rare. The ones from the full-size Cordoba are more plentiful, and they mount the same way. The only real work is building something to attach to the axle, so that end links can be bolted on.

I'll see if I can scan a diagram from the FSM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Get the word out. Pretty soon EVERY one of these wagons that comes up for sale will already have the rear bar mod on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Another convert! And pretty easy, wasn't it?

Honestly, we can't say enough good things about what this does for your wagon's handling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
I don't see why it wouldn't work on a sedan just as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #108 ·
Just bringing it back up as some new wagon owners may have have seen this modification before.

Still no trouble with my setup. Handles great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #127 ·
I've now logged tens of thousands of kms on this setup - summer, winter, TONS of highway, fully loaded and not, and it continues to hold up great. I've found no movement underneath of any components, no weaknesses showing. It's a nice, reliable, well behaved modification. I haven't found any downside to this.

Keep up the ideas, folks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #129 ·
Did you mount your swaybar with the curves on the ends facing up, or down?
Go to post #1, picture #2. The bar arms curve upwards and flatten out to horizontal at the end links. If you fit the sway bar both ways, you'll see immediately which one will cause you the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #149 ·
Well, with close to four years and lots of miles on the Ford rear anti-roll bar, I can report nothing but good things. Handling in every situation was improved, there has been no cracking or bending of steel anywhere, the muffler clamps have proven to be very secure mounts, and it has never given me even a second of doubt in its capabilities. Passengers in the car cannot get over how flat and stable and well-behaved it is when cornering, taking off-ramps at well over the 'caution' speed posted. They don't expect it from such a boat.

The only question to wagon owners, what are you waiting for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #152 ·
Yes, the exhaust clamps work. And I have trailered with this, loaded with lumber and people and gear, and put good cornering loads on it. Lots of miles, winter and summer, and no complaints whatsoever. It flat out works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #226 ·
They mount differently so I think it is hard to compare. I can tell you my 21mm Ford bar made my wagon twitchy enough that I am considering downsizing. A stiff, twitchy car with loose steering is no fun.
I upgraded the front to the T/A bar (1.25"? IIRC). I also tightened up the steering box, doing both adjustments on the bench. Made a world of difference to the steering.
 
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