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i currently use mobil 1 sull synthetic 5w-30 oil in my 96 impala, is that a good oil to use in a stock motor or should i use vavoline etc. And also does the weight of the oil mater?? full synthetic or conventional ???
 

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Stick with the Mobil 1!
 

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I you want max wear protection, then you could try some Brad Penn oil. It contains the most ZDDP you can get in an oil (of which has practically been legislated out of all oils these days).

http://www.bradpennracing.com/
 

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At least in the local Impala SS club a lot of people like the Amsoil synthetic oil, which can be left in for over 12000 miles without any ill effects, when used with an Amsoil oil filter. I haven't seen it from stores but there are many Amsoil dealers nationwide that can get it easily. I would use it myself, but at 175K miles on the car a little late to be switching to synthetic oil without having to replace all the seals and gaskets of the engine(even 125K miles when I got the car was too much for it) :). Stick the the full synthetic oil and stick with the 5W30, any thicker and can cause lubrication issues, thinner may cause oil pressure issues from not being thick enough. - Peter
 

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I have used Amsoil in the past with good results. So far, with me & a year now with the LT-1 wagon it's been Mobil-1 (It's cheaper, especially when on sale). I have however NEVER believed the Amsoil claim that you could go 25K miles between changes. 7500 miles is about where I felt comfortable in another vehicle. Would like to know if anyone has "Guinea Pigged" the LT-1 for the Amsoil experiment??:confused:
 

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I you want max wear protection, then you could try some Brad Penn oil. It contains the most ZDDP you can get in an oil (of which has practically been legislated out of all oils these days).
Bad advice. You don't need the ZDDP in a car with a roller cam. Also, the reason it was removed is because it is bad for cats. However, in a classic with a flat tappet cam and no cats, it is a great choice.
 

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Stick the the full synthetic oil and stick with the 5W30, any thicker and can cause lubrication issues, thinner may cause oil pressure issues from not being thick enough.
Peter, please expand on that statement if you will please, and provide the source for your reasoning if you did not come up with that conclusion on your own.

I consider that a FALSE statement. Logic and dependable sources reveal that the first # listed as the grade/weight of the oil has no bearing on hot oil performance.

Sort of a trick question for the non-novice. though those that visit or are familier with what I consider to be the premier oil related information website will know this already. :) What does the 'W' as noted on the label represent?
 

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That is the common explanation and also the common mistake as it fits neatly into that explanation, not unlike the assumption that the '327' cast onto the LT1 block has something to do with the CI or 'family' of block, while in fact it identifies the particular foundry that cast the LT1 block.

The 'W' in fact just identifies the type of test that is conducted to determine the grade (weight) of a given oil. As the '327' has nothing to do with the CI/family of the block, the 'W' has nothing to do with the season or temperature.
 

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.....The 'W' in fact just identifies the type of test that is conducted to determine the grade (weight) of a given oil......
So, that begs the questions.......How many different tests are there and what are their designations?

KW

.
 

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The 'W' in fact just identifies the type of test that is conducted to determine the grade (weight) of a given oil. As the '327' has nothing to do with the CI/family of the block, the 'W' has nothing to do with the season or temperature.
I will disagree, and a quick google search will provide lots of support for my position.

For example, here is a quote from Gulf Oil's FAQs:

What does 'W' stand for ? This is the common terminology used to indicate a multi-grade oil. 'W' signifies the winter rating of the oil, showing that it will perform well in cold weather. The lower the number prefixing the 'W', the lower the temperature the oil can withstand. Thus 10W- indicates a lower viscosity at low temperature than 20W-. The second figure shows the viscosity at 100 C, which is close to the bulk oil temperature in most water-cooled engines.
 

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Well I may have been partially incorrect there. But what it comes down to use what is recommended for the engine. With our cars its 5W30 or 10W30, I personally run 5W30 year round as I live in northern Illinois and why keep multiple grades of oil around. Now I wouldn't run 10W40 in it as it would be thicker that what our engines need and may cause efficiency losses due to the extra power needed to pump the oil through the system. That's the jist of it, use whats recommended for the engine and you will be fine just change the oil at regular intervals. Also the hot performance of the oil can be effected by the weight of the oil. Using a 20 weight oil may lead the oil becoming too thin for adequate protection in an engine not designed for it.

To whom stated they wouldn't keep the Amsoil in the engine for 25K miles. I probably wouldn't either but doing 12K miles on it probably wouldn't hurt, but would all come down to the quality of the engine oil(which needs to be sent to a lab to have it tested not just by looking at it). But for the engine oil change interval the 3000 mile interval dates back to when oil was single grade without all the detergents modern oils have. Modern day oil can last 5000 to 7500 miles depending on the condition of the engine, driving habits, and other factors. In fact the service manual for my 1993 Escort states the recommended oil change interval is 7500 miles, and that is using 1990's conventional oil, with a modern day synthetic oil, and if the engine was freshly rebuilt, that could possibly be extended even beyond that, though i do oil changes in the 4500-5000 mile range(I run synthetic blend oil in it). When I was driving my Caprice as a daily driver the oil change light came on in the range of 3500-4500 miles. Nowadays the JiffyLube line for 3000 mile oil changes is to simply sell more oil as even the conventional motor oil nowadays is far better than it was during the 60's and 70's, and the modern day synthetic oils blow those out of the water.

And the W stands for the winter viscosity rating of the oil when cold(yes I know others have stated that before me in this thread but I did already know that). - Peter

Peter, please expand on that statement if you will please, and provide the source for your reasoning if you did not come up with that conclusion on your own.

I consider that a FALSE statement. Logic and dependable sources reveal that the first # listed as the grade/weight of the oil has no bearing on hot oil performance.

Sort of a trick question for the non-novice. though those that visit or are familier with what I consider to be the premier oil related information website will know this already. :) What does the 'W' as noted on the label represent?
 

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I agree with pcordes1979. I had a 1991 Caprice Wagon that had the 305 V-8. I drove that car into the ground!! For 3 years, I had a 100 mile round trip drive to work. Changed the oil every 5 to 6 thousand miles. When I got the car in 1997 it had 70,000 miles. In 2007, when the car was hit & totalled by a teenage driver, I had 250,000 miles. This was on the "Original" motor & tranny. That car served me well!! I only "Hope" my 96 will last as long. I think it will because it's not being used as a "daily driver". I get her out maybe 2 times a week if I'm lucky!! ;)
 

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Though I am an Amsoil dealer, I run Mobil 1 In the Imp. Mainly due to it's lucky to get 500 miles a year on it. So I had no reason to change it in over a year. It's had M1 since new. A few years back at 115,000 miles when it got head/cam, I tore it all down and mic'd everything. Absolutely dead on factory specs.
They weren't easy 115k either. On it's 3rd tranny by then as well.

But as for Amsoil, it's unmatched. I have over 15k miles on my Duramax and the oil analysis is still good. Change filter and refill to level.
A friend had over 32k on his and was still getting back 98% on his samples.
So either M1 or Amsoil, these 2 synthetics are #1 in my book.
 
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