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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I am about to replace my front wheel bearings and needed some help. I looked at the sticky thread but only saw info for wheels and brakes but not bearings.


This video gives me an idea but am confused as the parts involved. I still have the rotors I bought it with three years ago and they seem fine. I only have to buy the inner/outer bearings and the seal right?

First time doing this so bear with me.
 

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Might help:

From Sec. 2, Art. A, steps 14 thru 19 & 2, B, step 1:

14. At vehicle, removed old rotors from spindles by removing hub dust/debris caps, cotter pins, castle nuts, washers and outer bearings in that order. Because new rotors were used, the inner bearings came off w/ the rotors and were discarded w/ same. Should new bearings need to be installed on an existing rotor, break down the parts as directed above but prior to pulling the rotor off, thread the castle nut onto the spindle a couple of turns. This will force the old inner bearing off the rotor when pulled from the spindle. Always use new oil seals when replacing bearings.

(2) new front inner wheel bearings – Timken Set 6

15. Packed the bearings w/ NLGI grade 2 grease. The palm of hand method works fine. A bearing packer is even better.
16. Races; Some maintain they should always be replaced w/ the matching race to the bearing being installed. Some don’t. I won’t argue either point. I simply used the provided races. Satisfaction w/ current industry wide tolerances for new bearings is my reasoning. I generally only replace them if there is extreme mileage or evident damage/wear to them. If you are at all in disagreement w/ this or uncertain about using an unmatched bearing and race, feel free to knock them out and replace them w/ the matched set.
17. Filled middle of inner rotor bores w/ about “3 heaping fingers” of NLGI grade 2 grease rotating it around so that it covered all exposed metal. Dropped (2) inner bearings in (2) inner rotor races (ABS ring side).

(2) new front wheel oil seals – Timken # 4739

18. Tapped seals into seal recess and fully seated them inside the inner hub of the rotors (ABS ring side).

(2) new front outer wheel bearings - Timken Set 3

19. Packed the bearings w/ NLGI grade 2 grease. The palm of hand method works fine. A bearing packer is even better. Placed back in plastic wrap and set aside.

B.) Installation:

1. Installed rotors on front spindles seating rotors over spindles and then installing outer bearings, washers, castle nuts and cotter pins in that order. The castle nuts were hand tightened and then torqued another ½ - ¾ turn until resistance was encountered when spinning the rotors by hand. This preloads the bearings. Now the castle nuts were backed off until a cotter pin could be placed through both the spindle hole and the castle nut “nook”. Spin rotors to check for looseness/over tightening. If too tight, loosen the castle nut so the next “nook” aligns w/ the spindle hole. Insert cotter pin and retest. If too loose, tighten the castle nut so the next “nook” aligns w/ the spindle hole. Insert cotter pin and retest. Once OK, bend one leg of the cotter pin back over the tip of the spindle until it points back to the head of the cotter pin and cut the base of the other leg off. Replace the dust cap retained earlier over the end of the hub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't replace bearings. I clean, re-pack, and reuse. No need to replace unless damage to bearing rollers or races.
Somethings up with them. Clunking/grinding feeling coming from the wheel. Tried re-tightening the lugs on the wheel to see if that helped but no help from that. This car has 188k miles on it so it was only time before they wore out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Might help:

From Sec. 2, Art. A, steps 14 thru 19 & 2, B, step 1:

14. At vehicle, removed old rotors from spindles by removing hub dust/debris caps, cotter pins, castle nuts, washers and outer bearings in that order. Because new rotors were used, the inner bearings came off w/ the rotors and were discarded w/ same. Should new bearings need to be installed on an existing rotor, break down the parts as directed above but prior to pulling the rotor off, thread the castle nut onto the spindle a couple of turns. This will force the old inner bearing off the rotor when pulled from the spindle. Always use new oil seals when replacing bearings.

(2) new front inner wheel bearings – Timken Set 6

15. Packed the bearings w/ NLGI grade 2 grease. The palm of hand method works fine. A bearing packer is even better.
16. Races; Some maintain they should always be replaced w/ the matching race to the bearing being installed. Some don’t. I won’t argue either point. I simply used the provided races. Satisfaction w/ current industry wide tolerances for new bearings is my reasoning. I generally only replace them if there is extreme mileage or evident damage/wear to them. If you are at all in disagreement w/ this or uncertain about using an unmatched bearing and race, feel free to knock them out and replace them w/ the matched set.
17. Filled middle of inner rotor bores w/ about “3 heaping fingers” of NLGI grade 2 grease rotating it around so that it covered all exposed metal. Dropped (2) inner bearings in (2) inner rotor races (ABS ring side).

(2) new front wheel oil seals – Timken # 4739

18. Tapped seals into seal recess and fully seated them inside the inner hub of the rotors (ABS ring side).

(2) new front outer wheel bearings - Timken Set 3

19. Packed the bearings w/ NLGI grade 2 grease. The palm of hand method works fine. A bearing packer is even better. Placed back in plastic wrap and set aside.

B.) Installation:

1. Installed rotors on front spindles seating rotors over spindles and then installing outer bearings, washers, castle nuts and cotter pins in that order. The castle nuts were hand tightened and then torqued another ½ - ¾ turn until resistance was encountered when spinning the rotors by hand. This preloads the bearings. Now the castle nuts were backed off until a cotter pin could be placed through both the spindle hole and the castle nut “nook”. Spin rotors to check for looseness/over tightening. If too tight, loosen the castle nut so the next “nook” aligns w/ the spindle hole. Insert cotter pin and retest. If too loose, tighten the castle nut so the next “nook” aligns w/ the spindle hole. Insert cotter pin and retest. Once OK, bend one leg of the cotter pin back over the tip of the spindle until it points back to the head of the cotter pin and cut the base of the other leg off. Replace the dust cap retained earlier over the end of the hub.
Do I have to take the brakes/calipers off also? Or can I slide out the rotor and those as one giant unit?
 

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When I set the bearing preload, the last step is to back the nut off, tighten it with your fingers until it stops (just stops, not grab hard and turn tight), then put the cotter pin in the nearest hole in the axle (there are two) counter clockwise. If it fits where you stopped turning the nut that is OK. I locate the holes before I put the nut on, so that I can easily find them when I am installing the nuts.
 
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