Chevy Impala SS Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I'm gonna strip the clear coat off my stock Impala wheels and while doing so I had a few questions...

1. Can I do this with the tires on?

2. There is some crap (not sure what - it seems like hardened grease and road grime of some sort) thats just stuck all over the back side of my wheels. I wash and scraped them with a stiff brush and got alot of it off but there is still alot of crap on it and it seems to be really stuck on there. What should I do, use a wire brush or something like that (steel wool, ect) and scrape the crap off before using the stripper, or should I just use the stripper right on it under the assumption that the stripper will remove all the crap inbedded in the wheels?

3. I also have some scrapes along the most outer edge of the wheels where it appears that the wheels scraped along a few curbs (I bought it this way). It's nothing to bad but some of the scrapes were definetly good wacks against some curb and I know they cannot be polished out. The actually are scrapes and little scars in the metal of the wheel. So can I use some sort of sander or sand paper to possible reduce these scars and play them down a little or something?

4. I assme I should take off the weights on my wheels too before doing this right? So when I'm done I asume I better put the weights back on too right? Should I make a mark on them or something to know where I can put the weights back on or do I have to take them immediately to get balanced?

TIA :cool:
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
#1, you can leave the tires on the rims, the stripper shouldn't hurt the rubber (lol that sounded bad). But I think I'd make a point not to glob more than needed onto the tire.

#2, If it were me, I'd try a few more times to get all the gunk I could off. Try using some stronger cleaners, or less dilouted versions of cleaners. While the stripper might eat through it and remove it, it'll probably take you a bit longer to get that part of the wheel cleared of gunk/clearcoat...

#3, Yup, there probably is something you could do.. no clue what to use tho. ;)

#4, you could probably mark, and replace the weights, but there's a good chance it'll still be out of balance. Just avoid the gentlemans club for a night and you'll have saved enough money to get em rebalenced
. When you get them rebalanced, ask them to use the stick on weights on the wheel instead of the crimp on ones, you'll thank yourself years from now when your wheels still look nice :cool:
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Lynn! Anyone else know an answer to #3 for me, or have insight on any of the questions 1-4? TIA
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Use red 3M Scotchbrite pads to clean the back of the wheel with some strong hot detergent (industrial strength). Buy a few of them. You can get these at most automotive paint stores. Make sure the wheels are dry before you put on the stripper. You can use the used pads to help cut, scrape and remove the clear coat once the stripper starts to work. Let the stripper do the work. Try to keep the stripper off the rubber. I've stripped wheels with tires on. Just don't let gobs of it sit on the rubber forever, wipe it off and clean the rubber with a wet cloth. Some of the stripper will collect between the bead and tire, just scrape it out. Use some good rubber gloves, not some cheap throwaways unless they are high quality and can withstand the solvents in the stripper. Sand away at the edges of your rims. The finer the paper the better. Sandpaper isn't designed to smooth metal, but emery cloth is. You can start with a fine file to smooth the metal fast in the really rough spots. Just don't leave deep file marks. Follow it with the most aggresive grit emery cloth that will remove the file scratches. You can do it by hand. Follow with a finer grit of emery cloth then a finer grit if needed then finish with an aggresive metal or rubbing compound followed by Mother's or any other mag polish. It'll be better than what you had. There are other metal polishes like Wenol's that will do too. Use what you got. Even chrome polish would probably work. But if you're removing the clear coat, use a good aluminum polish to bring some shine to the wheels and to polish the sanded wheel edge. It's hard work but for being on the cheap it comes out pretty good. If you're going to mark the wheel to replace the weights, go ahead, but do it last after everything is done so you don't clean off your marks. Buy new stick on weights, don't try to reuse the old ones. Clean the area with lacquer thinner or solvent with a clean Scotchbrite pad and rag to clean the area for the weights to stick on.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Renoman is right on with the 3M Scotchbrite pads. I used 3M RoLock pads with a mini die grinder to get the groves out. Turned air pressure down to around 70 psi and went at it. After that I used 600 grit sandpapaer to get grind marks off, then 1500 grit to finish up. I didn't use emery cloth but I may go pick some up and try it. After all the sanding I used brown rudge first with my die grinder, still at 70 psi. wash wheel, then blue Wenol's with die grinder, wash wheel, then red Wenol die grinder. Yep that's right, three coats. Then to get the buff marks off I went over it with red (very fine) Wenol by hand to get most of those out. Today I am going to use some cloth like stuff that has diamond in it to finish up getting the buff marks out. It took about 2 hours a wheel give or take a drink break. Hope this helps. Any more question?
Kevin
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Do NOT use the 3M pads or anything abrasive to try and remove the clearcoat. If you follow the directions on that can of paint stripper, it'll do the work WITHOUT the abrasives.

If you do use abrasives, you're in for a helluva lot of work to get the scratch marks back out.

Been there, done that on stock SS rims


For the scrapes on the rims, use some sandpaper to scuff them out. Sand only on the scratches. Do it after the clearcoat is removed.

As for the wheelweight, just leave them. If they don't come off, you're set. If they do, then just have the wheels rebalanced afterwards.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's been a long time since I painted airplanes in the Navy, but I remember we had to use special sand paper when sanding Aluminum.

If using the 'wrong' kind, it caused corrosion from dissimilar metal contact.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I used a product called peeler from pepboys for stripping the clear, works great.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Not to jump on anyones toes here, but I saw the questions in the for sale section on Super10's post. I used Peeler to strip my rims and center caps. But no matter what I tried, I could not get that plastic crap off of a new set of red bowtie centercaps. I polished my own rims too. I used the Eastwood Smoothing and Polishing kit. It was a but-load of work, and I can understand his asking price. Here is a quick pic of the rims shortly after the first day. Remember after every quick polish with Neverdull or Mothers, they came out lookin better. I even had them looking like frigin chrome. That is until the Colorado winter got ahold of them.




Any questions, get with me.

Mav
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I used "aircraft" stripper on my rims., yes i did it with the weights and tires still on the rims.

Did anybody have a problem with the stripper affecting the inner cast "spoked" part?

Lucky for me i was painting them, so i didnt really care... :D
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
MadMav: you ran those tires & rims in a Colorado Winter, Mav...?
Man...they must have been EATEN by the salt..?
I always switch mine over to 15 inch steel rims and tires for the winter months here..

Keep Safe over there !
Jim...
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Jim

I guess they wouldn't understand the Canadian SS wheel option code, AY??????????

;)

Carl
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top