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Discussion Starter #1
My 1995 Impala took some damage during storage, Mice decided the following plugs were tasty:
Under hood insulation.
Firewall insulation
The O2 receptacle, and O2 sensor.
The rear ABS cable where it plugs into the through body plug on the driver side.
The Passenger side water temp sensor for the dash Gage.
The Water pump temperature sensor wires. Plug available from parts store.
Possibly the horns, I haven't got that far yet.

Car is running but I have ABS light on and intermittent connection on the O2 sensor.

If anyone has a wreck that could supply any of these please PM me. I plan on hitting the wrecking yard this weekend looking for some of these.

Thanks,
AJK
 

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Many a us Feal Yur Paiyn

Do NOT repeat Not test your heater! Just proceed immediately to dropping the blower and plucking out mommie mouse and her cute little brood. Elstwise, bloody smelly carnage better'n any blender lol. I got nicked by a dealer for $400 when out of the country and my wife took it in after setting for 8 months.

Your rodents may be more charitable than where I live. Ornery little dickens like to gnaw right at the plug ends on my tractors so it's extra tough to splice. You're pretty lucky, - any one of about 10 million last gen B/D should put you pretty good on replacements.
 

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The hood insulation and firewall insulation are the most troublesome. They are hard to find in good condition, and the firewall insulation is difficult at best to remove/replace.


The connectors are the same for most/all of the 94-96 B-bodies, and D-bodies.


Use heat shrink crimp connectors instead of trying to solder the wires. Stagger them in large wire bundles to minimize the "lump" where the wires are spliced.
 

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Donor car is always an option but sometimes the originals are pretty brittle with age and heat. Most if not all connectors and/or pigtails could also be available new. Check for sites like this...

Automotive Electrical Connector Pigtails, Terminals, Tools and More

Definitely a good idea to stagger your connections about an inch apart to prevent like Fred mentioned a "lump" of spliced connections. I prefer to solder though over crimp connectors and cover with heat shrink and tape. If you crimp, be sure to invest/borrow a QUALITY crimp tool.
 

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I always pull on both ends of the wires in a crimp connector to verify that it is properly crimped.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone, i dropped the blower motor and the resistor pack and vacuumed. Then i wiped down as far as i could reach with a Lysol solution. I stuck an air hose down each vent and tried to blow any debris back toward my vacuum which was in the blower motor hole. I get a slight scent of mouse when the fan starts but it clears up quickly. My mice seem to chew the cables off right to the nub of the plugs as well. Mothballs and dryer sheets usually drive them away but not this time. Thanks for the link i will check them out.
 

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Thanks everyone, i dropped the blower motor and the resistor pack and vacuumed. Then i wiped down as far as i could reach with a Lysol solution. I stuck an air hose down each vent and tried to blow any debris back toward my vacuum which was in the blower motor hole. I get a slight scent of mouse when the fan starts but it clears up quickly. My mice seem to chew the cables off right to the nub of the plugs as well. Mothballs and dryer sheets usually drive them away but not this time. Thanks for the link i will check them out.
Mice are nasty little basturds. Look into adding a Filter below the Wiper Cowl to help block them from getting into the car. There was someone selling kits for this purpose or I believe there is enough info here you could fab a kit together yourself. Even some metal mesh over the opening could help to block their entry into the cabin.


On Crimp Vs Solder....this is a pretty good thread that talks about the 2 types and what to look for.

https://www.stevemeadedesigns.com/board/topic/139795-the-ultimate-answer-on-solder-vs-crimp/

As I mentioned, I prefer to solder BUT it is important that you know what you're doing to do this correctly. I have a lot of experience at this and always inline splice the wire and make sure the solder is "flowed" thru the entire connection.

Inline Splice? - This is what an inline splice looks like in case you weren't sure what I was referring to. If this is NASA approved, then you know it's good on your "Rocket Ship" too. :>)

http://makezine.com/2012/02/28/how-to-splice-wire-to-nasa-standards/

With crimping, I'm not a fan cause even though you may have a solid Mechanical connection when tugging on wires, these can loosen up over time. Also electrically there is not as much surface contact with the wires as you can accomplish with a solid solder joint. but is done correctly, I may live wit it in a pinch, I just don't trust them. If you do, get the ratcheting type of tool designed for this purpose. Do not use those combo Strippers/Crimpers you often see on the store shelves.
 

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cabin Filter

Wagon or Sedan?....doesn't matter. This kit is what I purchased years ago but gives you an idea of what I was referring to. It blocks what I believe is their only point of entry into the cabin. Certainly is where they get into the HVAC System and allows all that nasty mouse Stank and cooties to blow thru the interior.....YUK!!! Nasty little vermin.

Caprice Cabin Filter
 

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The cabin filter has proven to not stop the mice. They use it as nesting material. The filter is good for keeping dust out of the car.


The real fix is the flap on the end of the drain channel. The flap is either too small, and allows enough room for the animal to get past, or flaps both ways, and allows the animal to push it out of the way. The dilemma is replacing it with one that will close properly, open only out, and still allow the water to drain. A screen is not an option, because debris can clog it, and you get water in the car.


I have not designed a replacement flap, because keeping it closed requires some weight or pressure, and that will allow water to back up. Maybe one with small holes in the bottom that would allow the water through, but if the holes get clogged, open to allow the debris to wash out. Another might be one with an angled lip on the bottom to make it impossible for the little animals to get a grasp on it. The flap could be an extension of the original one, and be pop riveted to the original one, if it is still there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Fred does anyone have a picture of this, i am not familiar with where this "flap" is on the car, is at the bottom of the cowl? I am struggling with the Impala repairs and keeping it on the road as it's my only transportation right now. I just lost the drivers side exhaust pipe, and no one local has an exhaust for car, ended ordering the aluminized kit from summit. The timing belt on my Pacifica let go at highway speed and I had to quickly get the Impala out. I am struggling with an overheating issue that I had before putting the car away. I think it's that I just can't get the air out. Replaced both fans, one was not working and one was drawing high current. No fuses or breakers were bad or sockets melted, just when secondary fan came on it was drawing a fare amount of power. I had done the water pump (was leaking) and thermostat (180 deg.) when I had to replace the opti-spark. Replaced the radiator the year before. I have a 160 thermostat ready to go in, also replaced the pressure cap. Heater core is not blocked.
 

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I do not have a picture of the flap, but it is at the extreme right end of the cowl drain channel.

There should be a bleeder valve on the thermostat housing for letting the air out of the hose. You can get a "connector" with a threaded hole for a bleeder valve on ebay for about $10. It splices into the upper line at its highest point. You may have to tap the hole further to get the bleeder to install properly.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/38MM-Radiator-Hose-Temperature-Sensor-Adapter-Black-Breather-Tank-Adapter-/232126629742?hash=item360bd3476e:g:14MAAOSwImRYIj-K&vxp=mtr

You can get the motors for the fans, and just replace them, instead of the whole fan unit.
 

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I do not have a picture of the flap, but it is at the extreme right end of the cowl drain channel.

There should be a bleeder valve on the thermostat housing for letting the air out of the hose. You can get a "connector" with a threaded hole for a bleeder valve on ebay for about $10. It splices into the upper line at its highest point. You may have to tap the hole further to get the bleeder to install properly.


38MM Radiator Hose Temperature Sensor Adapter Black Breather Tank Adapter

You can get the motors for the fans, and just replace them, instead of the whole fan unit.
That's interesting Fred, as I have never seen that before. WHat I really like about that product is that it's made from aluminum, and not plastic.

Good find & post!
 

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Fred does anyone have a picture of this, i am not familiar with where this "flap" is on the car, is at the bottom of the cowl?
2.5 minutes with "cowl hole". But then again, I learned a thing or two too so we're even:
http://www.impalassforum.com/vBulletin/53-heating-cooling-hvac/266196-blower-motor-filling-water.html



I am struggling with an overheating issue that I had before putting the car away. I think it's that I just can't get the air out. I had done the water pump (was leaking) also replaced the pressure cap.
Important missing symptom, Are you losing AF? New cap, but of course you want to check you're retaining pressure a good amount of time after shutoff. Elsewise, pinhole at hoses or banjo crossover (or somewhere else hidden). You ARE raising car up high when bleeding? Most guys find it tough otherwise.
 

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That's interesting Fred, as I have never seen that before. WHat I really like about that product is that it's made from aluminum, and not plastic.

Good find & post!

And it is only $10 shipped.
 

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The cabin filter has proven to not stop the mice. They use it as nesting material. The filter is good for keeping dust out of the car.


The real fix is the flap on the end of the drain channel. The flap is either too small, and allows enough room for the animal to get past, or flaps both ways, and allows the animal to push it out of the way. The dilemma is replacing it with one that will close properly, open only out, and still allow the water to drain. A screen is not an option, because debris can clog it, and you get water in the car.


I have not designed a replacement flap, because keeping it closed requires some weight or pressure, and that will allow water to back up. Maybe one with small holes in the bottom that would allow the water through, but if the holes get clogged, open to allow the debris to wash out. Another might be one with an angled lip on the bottom to make it impossible for the little animals to get a grasp on it. The flap could be an extension of the original one, and be pop riveted to the original one, if it is still there.
ON the passenger side down low of the firewall I installed rat wire to keep them out of the blower also it does filter out any particles larger than 1/4 inch..

mint odors do keep them out up here. up in the Seattle Washington area they had this problem with the weather conditions creating the rat issues .. vehicles parked over night the critters chewed up the injector wiring on several .
 

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The cabin filter has proven to not stop the mice. They use it as nesting material. The filter is good for keeping dust out of the car.


......
Um, yes apparently it does. And yes they sure do. And yes it does a good job. lol

I happened across a listing in the book at AZ for cabin filter used on my wife's Tribute. There's zero reference to one in the Owner's Manual, so I get home and pull everything apart and sure enough there's one in there. So I changed it. After only 12 years! Tons of debris, but not all that much actual dirt. And it kept dry since no mold.

Mice had munched the hell out of it, but never broke through into the cabin.
 

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As far as solder or crimp goes... Depends on what you want to have happen.

GM actually welds wires together and is the BEST way to connect wires.

Each method has its pros and cons...

Crimp - Makes a mechanical connection and when done right will last a long time and doesn't create a reduction in current due to resistance when done with quality connectors. The main issues with these is that you will fail at a percentage of them. And another portion will eventually work their way free. Just no way around it. Not to mention they take up much more room than any other method. Regardless of what anyone will try to tell you crimp connectors will have a number of them fail over time. Heat shrink tubing over them will help but never makes it 100%.

Soldering - Makes more of a chemical bond. These connections will never come apart and will require heat to separate or you have to cut them apart. They can corrode easier than the bare wire, can make the wires more brittle to breaking over time if the wire is not wrapped right before soldering, and they can raise the resistance of the wire at the location of the soldering. Note that you should use heat shrink tubing with a sealant in it when doing them outside the vehicle. If you use electrical tape you should only use Scotch 33+ or 88+. They will live the longest. I have heard of heat shrink tape which may work as well.

If you look at GM Upfitters guide they suggest a combination of the two.. Crimp the connectors to gain the mechanical connection then solder the connection to insure it will stay together. This appears to be the best connection for use in vehicles since it has the pros of both types without the cons of either. You still should wrap both with some sort of heat shrink if done outside the vehicle to prevent corrosion.
 

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Um, yes apparently it does. And yes they sure do. And yes it does a good job. lol

I happened across a listing in the book at AZ for cabin filter used on my wife's Tribute. There's zero reference to one in the Owner's Manual, so I get home and pull everything apart and sure enough there's one in there. So I changed it. After only 12 years! Tons of debris, but not all that much actual dirt. And it kept dry since no mold.

Mice had munched the hell out of it, but never broke through into the cabin.
Agreed. While nothing is foolproof, it does help. Plus there is a wire mesh on the other side that they can't chew thru....at least on the filter I have.
 

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I was at the local yard over the weekend, and pulled a couple of fenders. I noticed that the 94s did not have the flap on the end of the cowl drain. I suspect that the mice have an easier time getting into the later model cars because of this. I do not know what year the stopped putting the flap on them, so it could be even earlier.
 

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Honestly, have never seen mice do what you describe, but I've seen plenty of damn squirrels do damage. where I live, would suspect squirrels over mice...
 
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