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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have a source where to get AC Delco part #10269709? it's one of the tranny cooler lines and can't seem to find it online. RockAuto doesn't have it, Hamilton Chevy has them on the eBay store, but at $130, that's a little steep especially when the other line is only $14. thanks
 

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Bend one yourself from a straight piece of 3/8" brake line.
The flares and inverted flare nut are standard!

Nab
 

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Does anyone have a source where to get AC Delco part #10269709? it's one of the tranny cooler lines and can't seem to find it online. RockAuto doesn't have it, Hamilton Chevy has them on the eBay store, but at $130, that's a little steep especially when the other line is only $14. thanks
What exactly is bad on the existing Line/Hose? Cause if you want to fix on the cheap, you have some options there. For example I just used Brass Plumbing Compression fittings on there when the Crimp portion was leaking. Some members have just used some worm Gears clamps in place of the Crimps. If the metal portion has a hole in it you could cut out the bad section and splice in 1 of these Brass compression fittings as well.

If you want to do it right, then replace the entire line. As you know OEM is pricey and you could redo that line in AN hose and fittings and never have to worry about it again. At $130 for OEM, you could most likely replace in a AN option for less than that. If you need more info on any of this let me know OR if staying stock...its a no-brainer.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My line is rusted pretty much all the way to where it meets the rubber boot. It is so like GM to continue to make one of the tranny cooler lines, but not the other one any longer. I might try the route that Nab has suggested. I've seen your threads before on the braided lines, and I actually bought those parts to replace exactly as you have, but since my line is rusty I'd prefer to have a newer one to use.
 

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After looking at the pic of the line you need,
it would definitely be easy to make with what looks like a 30" piece.
The inverted flare nut will even screw into the trans cooler.
On the other end you could use a union and join it to a hose barb fitting.

Nab
 

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Like Nab suggested, just make up a new section of Steel Line with a few bends. Then if on the Cheap, just use one of these Compression Fittings....

https://www.amazon.com/Anderson-Metals-50062-Compression-Fitting/dp/B000BO9DYO

....which you can pick up at home depot or Lowes. On the other end, just replace the Nut and Ferrule with a Brass Hose Barb that threads on "in place" of the Compression nut. Just be sure to use hose that is compatible with oil/fuel and you should have a repair that will hold up real well. My Comprssion fittings were on there years before replacing with the AN setup.

EDIT - Something like this on the other side of the compression fitting linked above.

https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tnpla/55538920?cid=ppc-google-New+-+Hose,+Tube,+Fittings+&+Valves+-+PLA_sCMQOJXDE___164124449255_c_S&mkwid=sCMQOJXDE|dc&pcrid=164124449255&rd=k&product_id=55538920&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-oPvp8S_4gIVQVSGCh2_WwDvEAQYBCABEgIMVvD_BwE

Just open up the box at the store, remove one of the Nuts and make sure the Female Hose barb threads on. For about $10 - $15 in fittings and a few clamps (per side), you got a ShadeTree repair that will hold up very well. Nice thing about the Compression Fitting is you dont need to "flare" the end, just use a Straight Cut on the Metal line with a tubing cutter....EzPz.
 

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I'll have to disagree with 4door here.
A compression fitting is what you use if your stuck on the side of the road.
It's not a permanent fix.

Nab
 

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I'll have to disagree with 4door here.
A compression fitting is what you use if your stuck on the side of the road.
It's not a permanent fix.

Nab
I wouldn't rule out a compression fitting as a permanent fix - they're used all over the hydraulic industry at thousands of psi for millions of cycles without failure. They're simple, inexpensive, easy to install and work well - what's not to like?

I've put them on the high side of my A/C line as a repair almost 10 years ago with no issues and wouldn't think twice about putting them on a transmission cooler line or anywhere else. I have them on power steering lines as well in 2 different vehicles.

As long as they're properly installed (which goes for any kind of fitting), they're as good if not better in some ways than inverted/bubble flared fittings in my opinion.
 

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=Fix Until Broke;12105880
As long as they're properly installed (which goes for any kind of fitting), they're as good if not better in some ways than inverted/bubble flared fittings in my opinion.
Compression fittings are what you use when your stuck on the side of the road.
It may be common practice in the plumbing industry where water pressure remains
in the 40- 60 psi range.

Would you use a compression fitting as a permanent fix for a broken brake line?

Nab
 

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Compression fittings are what you use when your stuck on the side of the road.
It may be common practice in the plumbing industry where water pressure remains
in the 40- 60 psi range.

Would you use a compression fitting as a permanent fix for a broken brake line?

Nab
I'm not going to change your mind/opinion on this - Just sharing real world experience and factual knowledge.

It's not only common practice in the plumbing industry at 40-60 psi, but also in the hydraulic industry at 4000-6000 psi. I've personally put thousands of these connections in service with hundreds of millions of cycles at these pressures (not an exaggeration at 4 cycles/second 24/7 for years) without failure. Yes, I would use a compression style fitting as a permanent fix for a broken brake line - on the side of the road or in the shop.
 

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I'll have to disagree with 4door here.
A compression fitting is what you use if your stuck on the side of the road.
It's not a permanent fix.

Nab
That's ok and I understand your concern but with trans Pressure what it is there, no reason to be concerned. Sure most Pressure Switches at the Water Tank are set to cut off at 60 PSI and on at 30 PSI but the Compression Fitting itself has a higher PSI range. The Brass fittings I've checked are spec'd at the 200 - 400 PSI range. Trans lines don't see that kind of pressure anyway.

From a personal experience standpoint...I had these brass Compression fittings on my Trans lines for Many Years and Many Miles and never an issue. Only removed them to convert over to AN lines since after doing the Engine Oil Cooler lines in AN, my trans cooler lines looked like Poo. I'm POSITIVE that if I did not remove the brass fittings, they'd still be on the car now. So I would not consider this a Temp fix at all.

EDIT - Just to be clear here since Brakes were mentioned. I would NOT....repeat, WOULD NOT ever consider using a compression fitting on a Brake System. the Pressures are much higher there. They do make special "unions" for this purpose and lines need to be flared.

EDIT2 - Just to include a pic of what the old Brass fittings looked like. Really old pic and sorry for the stupid Photobucket Logo right where the fittings are.
 

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I'm not going to change your mind/opinion on this - Just sharing real world experience and factual knowledge.

Yes, I would use a compression style fitting as a permanent fix for a broken brake line - on the side of the road or in the shop.
You don't need to change my mind, you may have to change state law though, because compression fittings are ILLEGAL to use on brake lines and for good reason. A compression fitting relies on the surface of the outside of the tube for clamping which can slip off if the surface has been degraded by corrosion. Also, an extra turn of the compression nut can crack it in half unlike an inverted flare fitting which clamps harder when extra torque is applied to the nut.

Nab
 

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You don't need to change my mind, you may have to change state law though, because compression fittings are ILLEGAL to use on brake lines and for good reason. A compression fitting relies on the surface of the outside of the tube for clamping which can slip off if the surface has been degraded by corrosion. Also, an extra turn of the compression nut can crack it in half unlike an inverted flare fitting which clamps harder when extra torque is applied to the nut.

Nab
We're getting way off topic here...I'm not nearly as concerned about legal laws as I am about physical laws. Physical laws demonstrate that either fitting will do the required job safely. We can go round and round on this all day and not change each others opinions. There's nothing wrong with inverted/bubble flare fittings, just as there's nothing wrong with compression fittings - both need to be properly done and have similar sensitivities as well as advantages/disadvantages. Both can fail if overtorqued, due to corrosion, due to incorrect assembly (many more opportunities to do this with inverted flare than compression by the way....), etc.

Now, back to transmission cooler lines...

Since the lines are "all rusty", I'd suggest using nickel copper tubing available in most autoparts stores and many online as well. It's very easy to form/bend into shape, can use whatever kind of fitting that you prefer and will never rust.

If you route it correctly, you can eliminate the hoses all together.
 

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Why even gamble on compression fittings,when one doesn't have to. Have I used them? Yes,but do I prefer them? No,especially since AN hose/fittings are so easy to source,and use.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Here's my line just for reference. I plan on getting some brake line and try bending it with a cheapo HF tube bender, we'll see how it turns out
 

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3/8" diameter brake line? Making factory style bends w/o kinking line isn't easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Quick thought, what issues would come up if I were to bypass the main radiator for tranny cooling and just use the dedicated factory cooler? Meaning just run the 2 lines straight from the transmission to the cooler, and plug the radiator.
 

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Quick thought, what issues would come up if I were to bypass the main radiator for tranny cooling and just use the dedicated factory cooler? Meaning just run the 2 lines straight from the transmission to the cooler, and plug the radiator.
2 positives come to mind- Tranny will run cooler and no posibility of cross-contamination of antifreeze into the tranny.

Nab
 

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+1 on the zero chance of cross contamination. Still a good idea to have a trans temp gauge to see if additional cooling capacity is called for...
 
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