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quote: '95 Fleetwood with some improvements

With comparatively flat ride, most all in the suspension I suspect. And interesting where the extinguisher might be mounted in the rear. The 'non-hardfreeze region' pavement is a nice touch. While not exactly 'street racing' by any stretch, the active roadwork, superlative deer-rich quality foliage, tires bumping their limit, and statistically dismal driving skills of each and every one of those oncoming, all add up to nearly exceeding prudent speed. Not that I would have thought so when I was a younger fart. ;)

It looks like a clean ride, and reminds me a.) I really need a dashcam, and b.) I'll certainly be doing the gunsight delete again when mine gets re-painted. The fender indicators frame the view perfectly without it IMO.


EDIT: From response to another thread Ima think I know who's driving?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi, 96 B--



It's hard to say who's driving--most likely it's a geezer who typically putters along at the speed limit after past times of methodical imprudence.



Yes, the suspension appears to be pleasantly flat and neutral in fast curves, controllable with gas/brake and not skittish, firm and well-damped in high-speed dips. Not a barge and not a barnstormer, but fun to push.



A spot for the extinguisher mount would be behind the driver's seat.


A bit off-topic but, speaking of prudent driving, a few weeks ago I drove to a national park in Albania, of all places. Ay, caramba. The last 10 miles of single-track took more than two hours--my mind revolves around things like sidewalls, traction, all those suspension/steering/brake pieces, loved ones, and cliffs. Then you have to repeat it on the way out. Residents go a little faster--they know the road and mostly have good tires, but a single trip over the mountain inflicts a beating on a vehicle. Not a place to ever take a B/D-body or an automatic. Had a manual diesel 4x4, often just idled along in 1st or 2nd gear. 2WD is nuts, but I saw a newish Mercedes sedan at the end--a tourist family that maybe didn't know quite what they were getting into. Impressed with the strength of MB parts but suspect the car had some underside damage.



Here's a short German clip that shows the beginning. Three minutes in you see a few concrete guards and wonder, why bother?


Other than some basic grading and fixing washouts + rockslides, many residents don't want it "improved", and I get their point. They like their quiet valley, have limited capacity, and the current road limits access.
 

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Well, invested another 4 minutes of my life and watched it again. I get the impression driver has made that run at least a few times prior. And that Albanian ?"road" looks like it woulda' been a hoot with my old Corvair.
 

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quote: '95 Fleetwood with some improvements

With comparatively flat ride, most all in the suspension I suspect. And interesting where the extinguisher might be mounted in the rear. The 'non-hardfreeze region' pavement is a nice touch. While not exactly 'street racing' by any stretch, the active roadwork, superlative deer-rich quality foliage, tires bumping their limit, and statistically dismal driving skills of each and every one of those oncoming, all add up to nearly exceeding prudent speed. Not that I would have thought so when I was a younger fart. ;)

It looks like a clean ride, and reminds me a.) I really need a dashcam, and b.) I'll certainly be doing the gunsight delete again when mine gets re-painted. The fender indicators frame the view perfectly without it IMO.


EDIT: From response to another thread Ima think I know who's driving?
I think it's you Bob. Fess up.

Mark: Snowman-33
 

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I think it's you Bob. Fess up.

Mark: Snowman-33


No, not this time. That thar looks like it could pass for Ozarks hills, but some of the trees don't look right. And the lack of crappy pavement eliminates Missourah. It struck me more like Appalachian terrain - make of that what you may. lol I'd like to know the susp. setup though. It reminds me more of my old FTSS (sigh) than the setup on my current one.




Not impressed if one has to cross the double yellow to negotiate the highway.

Any deducted points more than countered by valiant effort to resuscitate the FW section. ;)
 

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I think it's you Bob. Fess up.
Hi, Mark--No, I don't think it's Bob.
Mark
That car has new front/rear suspension, all less than 30,000 miles, some much less. Front and rear regular GM control arms/bushings/balljoints (not the big balljoints, unfortunately). Moog/GM steering parts. Dick Miller triangulation braces in rear and that FBody (?) brand front bar to tie the frame together using the swaybar frame mounts. Both these bracing improvements are noticeable.
Rear got Moog cargo coils and Airbag 1000s. Coils shoulda had a bit removed to keep the rear end an inch lower. Oh, well. The Airbags could have been omitted since they're kept at the minimum pressure almost all the time (i.e., not needed).
Shocks--regular blue/yellow Bilsteins all the way around for a huge improvement. Rear bar--stock FWB.
All that would create a tendency for highspeed oversteer (doubleplus ungood), so the front bar is not the original FE1 28mm item but the FE3 Impala/HD one (30mm I think). Urethane frame bushings can be a bugger to do--urethane doesn't really compress, but the darn bushings/brackets overlap the beginning of a curve in the bar (dumb GM) , so it's necessary to carve a little out of the side of one end of the bushings, or the bushings/brackets will never go on properly. Swaybar endlinks are the white urethane GM ones with the recessed washers--out of production but can be tracked down, and seem to fit better/tighter than aftermarket urethane.
Fast-ratio steering box, Borgeson steering shaft and u-joint ends. Box is due to be swapped out for a newly adjusted spare. Plastic steering sphere kit due to go into the steering column to get rid of one of the last little sources of slop.
Brakes: new or newer all round and MC, Delco parts. Some kinda Wagner severe service metallic pads up front, which work well from speed.
New rear axles and outer bearings. ABS delete since no FWB axle w/ ABS reluctor gear available. Slight vibration remains--side bearings in the pumpkin--not too bad to do.
All torqued/cottered/loctited as appropriate. Oh, and stock 15-inchers w/ whitewalls :)
Wish list: a very large bucket of money, a wrecked CTS-V, and a talented Frankenstein shop to put that suspension/drivetrain under a FW body. A giant-braked, BMW-outhandling, 535 hp'd rolling living room. With a hood ornament.
 

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AHA! I knew it! Laudable upfits all, making the wheels/tires the weakest link. Ya ain't gonna believe your enhanced quality of life with 18's and some oversized rubber. Not quite re-birth perhaps but:

And the new design steering spheres = neato: gm, buick, cadillac, chevrolet, oldsmobile, & pontiac steering column internal parts knucklepivot 26001507 | Steering Column Services

I really have to rein in the impulses with my current FWB to keep from changing even a single thing more from what I've already done. I sure would love a set of sacked out SS coils, but then the law requires Bilsteins all around - and THEN I'd be tempted to stick a second rear bar on again, - and THEN there's those rear discs, and THEN.....

My old car was --> perfect <-- for (really really) long solo commutes mixed with the occasional enjoyment of abrupt direction changes around town. My current rig is getting speced as a 'stealth blu-hair couple cross-country sleeper'. It's shaping up pretty well. The hitch serves as an acceptable Buick brace, but some things on the table might be that F-body front brace, plus I have a set of DM braces but was saving them for the black car. With everything set it's time for an alignment, so I'll have it done using the 'spirited SS driving' numbers. None of those would affect straightline interstate cush, but then in the turns........... But enough about me, you ought to set up a sig if any other goodies on yours eh.
 

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I just got back from a week in the Smoky Mtns for the Fall colors = great region, charming treacherous 2-lane paved goat paths they call 'roads', and more than enough overlooks and trails to explore. I misplaced your previous recommendation on dash cams and interested your take on what's out there now v. what you use.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
96B,

Some earlier camera thoughts with updates:

I've used a little white Sony "actioncam" alternative to a GoPro (and a couple hundred dollars less). Originally bought 4 years ago for some marine use since it has an accessory waterproof case. I imagine they are cheaper and better/easier now. It's a Sony HDR-AS100. They now sell for well under $100 used on ebay.

For some real-life examples from that camera, look here: https://eagleblade.com/videos/. Many of the on-board clips on the little 13 and 21-foot boats were done with that camera, and the tunnel shots on the 39-foot taxi. Aerial and shore with different equipment.

Superb Sony video quality and image stabilization. Not the easiest controls, since it's designed to be so compact. You have to button-scroll through various LCD menus to get to the things you want. Image stabilization can make playback a little wavy-looking depending on circumstances, but the videos are very high quality. Wide angle lens, so you don't want to shoot faces with it, and there is of course some distortion. The waterproof cover has a built-in lens for wider view but will increase the distortion. It's not a pro camera, so you can't add filters (like a polarizer, which would be very useful on sunny days and on water)

One bad feature true of many little cameras--microphones are on the front, so when exposed there's wind noise unless you slap together a foam-n-duct-tape windsock for it. For any outdoor use (e.g., fender/bumper), I'd look for a camera with wind protection. Can turn wifi on and use a smartphone to position it right. It's a fun outdoorsy/action camera with long recording life if you keep the wifi off. Batteries can be swapped out. Also has GPS embeddable. The suction mount holds very well on fiberglass, metal, or glass, but not on a grained dashboard. On an exterior surface (boat hull, car body) it's wise to add a safety string to the camera--the suction cup does occasionally come loose with enough shaking. It does come with sticky permanent mount clips for the helmet crowd.

Comes with good editing software--relatively easy to learn.

Cameras: the image quality's all pretty good these days. Re a dashcam in particular, I'd look for something from a real company that actually does R&D and makes things, like Sony. I'm sure the many cheapo brands will work, but their controls, instructions, software, and lifespan won't be as easy/good. I'm guessing you want convenient to use and download.

Update: I've done a little random looking at newer dash/marine cameras--no real need, just curiousity. Most of them make me think of nuclear powerplant control rooms (too much to learn) but without the AZ-5 easy switch (Chernobyl joke).

Now I'm feeling inspired to do something different, like bolt the camera to the engine cradle or something for a road-level forward view and take a drive, or position it to catch the tire/suspension behavior as well. Or put it in the back and watch the driveshaft and rear susp.
Hope this helps,
Mark
 
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