Oops! UCA Pivot Shaft - Chevy Impala SS Forum
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2004, 06:15 PM
kilr95ss
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Seeing the bolt head on the outer part of the frame, me and my trusty Snap On impact wrench removed the bolt, then realizing the bolt was pressed in and the nut was supposed to be remove instead leaving the bolt in the frame.

Seeing how the bolt will spin when the alignment shop trys to loosen the nut to add or remove shims, what do I need to do?
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2004, 06:23 PM
broderick
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get a new bolt and nut and press it in??
post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2004, 07:25 PM
kilr95ss
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[img]redface.gif[/img] Yeah I guess that would work, huh? Maybe the local Chevy dealer will have 2 in stock. Thanks for stating the obvious. [img]redface.gif[/img]
 
post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2004, 07:56 PM
impala_1995_ss
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Quote:
Originally posted by broderick:
get a new bolt and nut and press it in??
Not quite. The bolt is knurled at the end and by using the impact, you stripped the frame. Using new bolt might help a bit but VERY unlikely - it will spin in place.

You have 3 options:
1. Leave as is and have the alignment guy yell at you.
2. Try new bolt and hope they work.
3. You can have the bolts tack welded to the frame to aviod them spinning and making the alignment guy happy.

Pro:
1. Installation is HELLA fast using said impact.
2. Might actually work
3. Make friends with alignment guy

Con:
1. Alignment guy mad at you. May only be mad once after camber is set.
2. May not work.
3. Removing arms in the future maybe a bit more difficult. Turning open end wrench a 1/4 turn at a time takes A LONG TIME. I suggest you buy a closed end wrench that has a built-in ratchet for faster assembly.

BTW, I used an impact too. I didn't know they were knurled either. I chose option 1 and got lucky with the alignment guy. He may have been pissed but I left the car with him and didn't hear a thing when i picked it up.

Good Luck!
post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2004, 08:17 PM
kilr95ss
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I think my father in-law has a 110 stick welder. I may go get it and just tack the old bolts in.
post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2004, 08:34 PM
Spartus
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Mine were all fubared when I removed them so I went to the dealership and purchased 4 new ones. The knurled area on the new bolts is about .100" further out on the bolt.. This will allow the knurled area on the new bolts to contact some virgin metal.. In theory that is...

But on mine I ended up using some washers between the bolt head and the frame because the knurled area stuck out too far and contacted some of the shims... I used some lock nuts too when I put it all back together. The alignment guy didn't say anything about the bolts spinning, so maybe it worked out for him...

And yeah, when I put mine together it took me 1/4 turn on each nut.. fun fun...
post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-07-2004, 02:24 PM
Mike454SS
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Yeah, Noel wasn't too happy with me on AIM when I told him he probably stripped the frame and not the knurlings on the nut...I did it on one bolt too though...in my case the nut came right off, but the cross shaft was seized to the bolt (rust sucks). Tiny tack weld never hurt anybody.
post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-11-2006, 03:28 PM
SSWEET
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Just ran into this problem myself ... alignment tech said he could not continue with the job until the problem was fixed. He suggested tack welding them to the frame so they don't spin.

Have any of you guys had any luck with tack welding the bolts to the frame? This seems to be the easiest method of rectifying the problem, but what are the drawbacks? If I do tack them up, can I break the weld later on down the road if need be?

Thanks.
post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-11-2006, 04:10 PM
95wagon
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Tack weld a little ear of metal to the edge of the bolt head.

Slide the bolt in place with the ear against the frame bracket.

When the bolt tries to turn the ear will touch on the frame and stop it from turning.

This way you can make a careful small weld on the bench rather than trying to do it in the car .
Plus you have not done something that you can't undo

Gerry
post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-11-2006, 05:31 PM
Leardoctor
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Wink

I had the same problem on my 9c1 and rounded out two of the holes with my impact gun because the bolts were rusted to the cross shaft.

My alignment guy didn't care because he could get a wrench on both ends of the bolts from the top of the arm, we just temporarily removed the splash flap form the inner fender so it wasnt in the way. [img]graemlins/.gif[/img]
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