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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 09:15 AM Thread Starter
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Another brake overhaul thread

1995 Chevy Caprice front and rear brake overhaul and stainless flex line installation procedures and tips for RPO JL9 rear disks & JA9 front disks:

Put too much time into researching and performing this job to let it eventually fade from the memory banks. The parts listed are what I decided to use. The choice of parts isn’t important because others will use different parts as they see fit. What’s important is the process and the result. That’s what I mainly wanted to document. My appreciation and credit to both the NAISSO and ISSF forums for offering valuable insight into many decisions made for this project.

I. Rear Disk Brakes –


A.) Bench Work, Prep and Parts Used:

(1) set Remanufactured L & R OEM PBR Calipers by A1 Cardone for appropriate GM RPO JL9

1. Inspected rebuilt units to insure dust boots were installed correctly, then checked threads on both the bleeder screw and the brake line fittings and for overall integrity of units.

(1) G2 Caliper paint kit (red) and (1) can Duplicolor Caliper aerosol paint (black)

2. Painted calipers w/ G2 Caliper paint kit (red). Best to pair this up w/ the front calipers as the kit is more than enough for 4 calipers and has time constraints. If so, complete all steps from article II; section A; steps 1 through 7 at this point. I’d guesstimate there’s really enough to do about 5 calipers w/ 3 coats each. The main impediment isn’t the amount G2 provides, but rather that the clock is ticking. After 4-6 hours, the paint will become unworkable and it isn’t until the 3rd coat that the finish gets the desired glossy shine. Be certain bleeder screw and brake line fittings are completely sealed. Warning - It’s crucial during any caliper drain/repair that no contaminants are introduced inside the caliper housing. Coat the dust boots w/ Vaseline so any unintended brush strokes can easily be wiped off later after paint has dried and cured.
3. At vehicle, removed cap from master cylinder to check fluid level. If it’s low, disconnecting the brake hard lines could allow one of the two partitions to run dry. Top it off. If it’s full, return the cap and seal the master cylinder.
4. Dislodged and removed factory retaining clips holding the hard and rubber flex lines static against the brackets secured to the axle. Disconnected hard lines from original rubber flex lines taking care not to twist the hard lines. A flare nut line wrench is your best friend for this one. See Note 4 about plugging the now leaking hard lines.
5. Removed and retained bolts attaching old bracket assemblies to rear axle keeping old calipers, pads and rubber flex lines attached to brackets. Slid entire assemblies from rotors and off to the bench. Be aware that the FSM states these bracket to axle bolts be replaced. If you’re at all unsure about the integrity of these bolts, replace them. That said, these bolts are metric class 10.9. That’s a tough (hardened) bolt roughly equivalent to Imperial grade 8. I see no reason why they can’t be reused provided Loctite thread locker or equivalent is used.
6. Removed old pads from old calipers and retained/cleaned the backing plates.
7. Retained stainless H clips from old calipers paying attention to orientation. They can only go one of two ways. Remember the right way. Used steel wool to clean up the H clips. You can get new H clips in a rear disk hardware package (Raybestos # H5631A)which includes the 2 H clips, 4 bracket boots and 4 bracket bolts w/ thread locker pre-applied. Since new brackets already come w/ the bracket boots, bracket bolts and slide pins, it’s senseless to get the kit just for the H clips if you’re getting new brackets (see Note 1). However, if the old H clips are damaged or irreparably bent, you will have to get new ones.
8. Removed old brackets from old calipers and inspected, paying close attention to the condition of the slide pins and guide channels using these findings to determine whether new brackets are necessary. Disconnected and discarded old rubber flex lines from old calipers retaining the 2 banjo bolts. Be sure to remove and discard any old crush washers from the banjo bolts.
9. Discard/exchange old calipers, brackets and pads accordingly (core charges, future project, etc…).

* Note 1 - If you need to replace your caliper brackets, I’d recommend you buy them brand new and separately from the calipers if the calipers are remanufactured. Should you get a remanufactured caliper w/ bracket, you may get a remanufactured bracket. Whereas the caliper should be fine (and probably is due to the liability issues associated w/ rebuilding such a unit), there’s a fair chance that the guide channels on the remanufactured bracket could be worn and potentially problematic. It isn’t worth taking a chance on particularly since it’s the bracket guide channels that have such a high wear rate on these rear disk brakes.

(2) New caliper brackets: Dorman #619-001

10. Removed boot and slider pin assemblies from new brackets. Removed no frill factory brake lubricant of unknown origin from boot and slider pins and set assemblies aside.
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 09:16 AM Thread Starter
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11. Taped off recessed bores of brackets, prepped/cleaned brackets and completely coated w/ Duplicolor caliper aerosol paint (black).
12. After caliper paint has dried and cured, threaded the 2 banjo bolts w/ 2 new crush washers each (Al is OK. Cu apparently better) into the brake line fittings on the calipers a few turns. Don’t tighten. This is merely to prevent contaminants from possibly entering the caliper housing.

(2) Speedbleeders # SB1010 (M10 x 1.0)

13. Some use them. Some don’t. I do. Threaded the speedbleeders into the bleeder screw fittings. Be very careful when threading the bleeders and banjos into the calipers. What w/ the time and expense of coating the calipers, they’ll be w/ the car for the duration. All future rebuilds will need to be done by you or the shop of your choosing. I’m sure not going to be sending THESE cores back to A1 Cardone, warranty or not. Therefore, the threaded fittings must stay clean and true. Should one become stripped, there are some options, but none better than being careful not to strip them in the 1st place.
14. Coated both sides of the H clips retained earlier w/ Bendix Ceramlub (see Note 2). Assembled the H Clips into the calipers. The long side should point to the piston (I didn’t really expect you to remember that from earlier. If you did, give yourself a cookie). This allows full travel of the piston and pad during caliper engagement.

*Note 2 – My use of this product I credit to Bill Harper, aka “Navylifer”, who moderates the Brakes section of the ISSCA forum. Effective temperature range from -70 to +2500 degrees Fahrenheit w/ negligible washout. This product is, at present, unequalled. Although I haven’t used it long enough to give a long term critique, it’s the ability to withstand washout that I’m most enthusiastic about. That it can withstand 2500 degrees is nice, but altogether unnecessary and overkill.

15. Boot and slider assemblies; using Ceramlub, filled the 4 rubber boots about halfway and completely coated the ends of the 4 slider pins that recess submersed within the bracket. Reinstalled slider pin/boot assemblies in brackets and insured proper seal of boots to brackets. Don’t fill the boots completely as there has to be some air inside to allow for proper expansion and contraction of the calipers on the brackets. Coating the slider pins should prevent/severely curtail the oxidation that will inevitably result from the pins’ exposure to this air.
16. Using Ceramlub, coat the bracket guide channels that will directly abut the pads. Just a dab will do you here, however be alert this is a trouble spot due to the direct metal to metal grind that constantly, and sometimes violently, occurs between the hard pad backing plate and the bracket. If you’re going to do periodic maintenance, this would be a place to check and/or relubricate often.

(2) Centric Premium rear rotors #120.62053

17. No slots. No holes. Just metal. More about Centric Parts in the addendum to this procedure.
18. The hat (both back and front) and vented edges came e-coated (electrostatically coated). Unnecessary perhaps, but I added another layer of Duplicolor Caliper aerosol paint (black). Go to town painting them, but insure ALL residual overspray onto the rotor surface is completely removed and cleaned prior to final install.
19. At vehicle, insured parking brake wasn’t set and removed old rotors from axle. Mine weren’t frozen to the axle w/ rust, but in case this happens, spray around base of lug nuts and around axle flange/rotor juncture w/ penetrating oil and turn rotor by hand. This allows gravity to help the penetrating oil spread. If it still won’t budge, use the BFH (3 lb sledge or ball peen work best) as persuasion. Direct the blows between the lug nuts staggering blows in criss-cross fashion similar to lug nut tightening sequence. Don’t hit the lugs! Hit anything BUT the lugs (particularly if the rotor is being trashed/recycled back to Asia). If this doesn’t work, once more w/ penetrating oil and let sit awhile (overnight if possible). Repeat until dislodged. Once rotors are removed, clean all oxidized surfaces of the axle flanges thoroughly w/ emory cloth until smooth and true. You hit a lug didn’t you? Now’s the time to replace it. Want to insure you’ll never have to go through THAT again? See Note 3.

* Note 3 – Apply an even layer of the Ceramlub over the entire axle flange that abuts the inside of the rotor. Works better than the old school silicone spray treatment and will promote a clean, true surface for the rotor to rotate against which, in turn, should be beneficial to the overall effectiveness and longevity of the calipers and pads as well. Dpn’t get the Ceramlub on the lug nut threads!

* Note 4 - Believe it or not, standard rubber tire stem caps filled w/ RTV sealant will effectively seal your brake hard lines during the disassembly process. Just remove them from your wheels, clean and dry the inside, dab them w/ RTV and push them over the leaking hard line. This will prevent the master cylinder from draining completely and creating a new and improved headache. Probably better ways to do this, but this was free and effective. Afterwards, pull the caps off, remove the RTV (will now be solid and easy to get off), clean them and put them back on the wheels.

(1) set Earl’s 5 piece braided stainless steel flex line kit # 28A140ERL

20. Stainless flex lines covered later in the installation section.

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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 09:22 AM Thread Starter
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(1) set Performance Friction Carbon Metallic brake pads # 0628-20

21. Brake pads covered later in the installation section.

(1) jar Bendix Ceramlub (Thanks again Bill!)

Miscellaneous:Materials which will be necessary at most and handy at least -

· Brake parts cleaner. Carb cleaner is not brake parts cleaner. Non-chlorinated brake parts cleaner is best.
· Penetrating oil. No, WD-40 is not penetrating oil.
· WD-40. In case I need to displace water since WD-40 is a ‘W’ater ‘D’isplacer.
· CRC Disk Brake Quiet. Much more uniform and tacky than the tubes of goop they send out w/ new pads.
· Loctite thread sealant
· Thread anti-seize
· RTV sealant
· Silicone lubricant
· NLGI Grade 2 Multi-purpose grease
· Absorbent towels, rags, etc…
· Cotter pins & crush washers.


B.) Installation:

1. Now’s the time to adjust/service the parking brake. Once tolerances for the parking brake shoes were set, installed new rotors onto the axle flanges.
2. Prepared the disk pads by coating the back of the pads w/ CRC disk brake quiet. Installed the proper backing plate retained earlier on the appropriate pad over the CRC dbq film. Now coat the outer surface of the backing plate w/ CRC dbq.
3. Installed caliper brackets onto axle using the metric class 10.9 bolts retained earlier or w/ new replacements. These bolts must be coated w/ Loctite or equivalent and torqued to 74 lb/ft. If you’ve never used or owned a torque wrench before, now’s the time. There’s simply too much riding on this overhaul for it not to be performed correctly.
4. Assembled pads on the Ceramlub pre-lubricated bracket guide channels and then installed the calipers over the pads. Be certain the anti-rattle springs on the pads are seated correctly on the caliper H clips. The springs have 2 ends. Each end should ride on one of the two corresponding sleeves of the H clip. Bolted the calipers to the brackets. The bolts are provided w/ the new brackets and come precoated w/ thread locker. If reusing old bolts, apply thread locker to these prior to install. Torqued these bolts to 23 lb/ft.
5. Installed the left and right rear braided stainless flex lines to the hard lines, again taking care not to twist the hard lines. Don’t tighten them yet. Threaded the banjo bolts retained earlier through the banjo fittings attached to the stainless flex lines and into the caliper brake line fittings. Be certain the 2 new crush washers are on either side of the banjo fitting (one seated between caliper and banjo fitting. One seated between banjo fitting and bolt head). Now tighten the banjo bolt to the caliper securely, but w/out over tightening. The rear calipers have aluminum housings and the threads will strip more readily than iron. Finally, tightened the flex to hard line connections and secured them w/ the factory retaining clips.
6. Replaced the “5th line” atop the differential w/ the 5th braided stainless flex line making certain all old crush washers were removed, discarded and replaced w/ new.
7. Checked the master cylinder to make sure the fluid level was above the bottom drain ports of both partitions. If there is fluid above this point, air won’t enter the master cylinder. If fluid drops below this point, air will enter. This check is just to be certain that during removal of the calipers and lines that enough old fluid remains to prevent air from entering the master cylinder. There still should be an adequate supply of old fluid left and since you’ll be bleeding the system of all old fluid, topping off now will only create more work later during the bleed process. However, if the master cylinder is low enough to begin introducing air into the system, add some new brake fluid.


II. Front Disk Brakes –


A.) Bench Work, Prep and Parts Used:

(1) L & R OEM RPO JA9 Caliper &

(2) front caliper rebuild kits - Raybestos # WK2005

1. At vehicle, dislodged and removed factory retaining clips holding the hard and rubber flex lines static against the bracket secured to the frame. Disconnected hard lines from original rubber flex lines taking care not to twist the hard lines. A flare nut line wrench is your best friend for this one. See Note 4 about plugging the now leaking hard lines.
2. Removed old caliper pins keeping old calipers, pads and rubber flex lines intact as a complete assembly. Slid entire assemblies from rotors and off to the bench. The original caliper pins must be perfectly smooth w/ no corrosion/pitting and w/ no grooves worn into channels adjacent to the threaded portion. So your caliper pins are anything but what was just described? Discard them.

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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 09:28 AM Thread Starter
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3. Removed old pads from calipers.
4. Disconnected and discarded old rubber flex lines retaining the banjo bolts. Be sure to remove and discard the old crush washers from the banjo bolts.
5. Inspected OEM units checking threads on both the bleeder screw and brake line fittings and for overall integrity of units.
6. Removed all washers (4 per caliper: 2 large. 2 small), bushings (2 per) and piston clips (1 per) from calipers and discarded same. Leave the caliper pin channels vacant if you’re planning to paint the calipers. There’ll be crud in these. Clean it out thoroughly w/ brake parts cleaner and a rag.
7. Rebuilt the units using the seal and dust cap included in each of the two rebuild kits (Raybestos # WK2005). I won’t go into specifics here. All but diehard home mechanics, professional mechanics and people foolish enough to paint their calipers do this work anymore. Suffice to say that it must be done right or really bad things can happen. Do it right. If you’re in the least bit uncertain about doing this, have a pro do it.
8. Painted the front calipers along w/ the rears at this point w/ G2 Caliper paint kit (red) using same precautions on threaded fittings (completely sealed) and dust boots (coat w/ Vaseline). Some paint will get into the caliper pin channels where new washers will be installed. Once the paint has dried and cured, be certain all paint is chipped away and completely removed from these channels. If left in channels, the new washers won’t fit properly and will bind against the new caliper pins.

(2) Speedbleeders # SB1015 (M10 x 1.5)

9. Threaded the speedbleeders into the bleeder screw fittings.

(1) front brake hardware kit – Raybestos # H5500

10. The kit has parts for both front calipers. Installed new washers (again: 2 large and 2 small per caliper) and bushings. The clips can be installed later w/ the new pads. Apply Ceramlub to the inner circumference of all washers. This will allow the new caliper pins to glide through the washers once assembly is complete and calipers installed.
11. Thread the 2 banjo bolts w/ 2 new crush washers each (Al is OK. Cu apparently better) into the brake line fittings on the calipers a few turns. Don’t tighten. This is merely to prevent contaminants from possibly entering the caliper housing.

(2) Centric Premium front rotors #120.62035 Cryo treated by NW Cryogenics

12. No slots. No holes. Just metal. More about Centric Parts and cryogenic treatment in the addendum to this procedure.
13. The hat (both back and front) and vented edges came e-coated (electrostatically coated). Unnecessary perhaps, but I added another layer of Duplicolor Caliper aerosol paint (black). I left the rear surfaces w/ the ABS ring untouched. For the front/hat, insure the inner bore of the rotors and the lug nuts are sealed/taped against overspray. Go to town painting them, but insure ALL residual overspray onto the rotor surface is completely removed and cleaned prior to final install.
14. At vehicle, removed old rotors from spindles by removing hub dust/debris caps, cotter pins, castle nuts, washers and outer bearings in that order. Because new rotors were used, the inner bearings came off w/ the rotors and were discarded w/ same. Should new bearings need to be installed on an existing rotor, break down the parts as directed above but prior to pulling the rotor off, thread the castle nut onto the spindle a couple of turns. This will force the old inner bearing off the rotor when pulled from the spindle. Always use new oil seals when replacing bearings.

(2) new front inner wheel bearings – Timken Set 6

15. Packed the bearings w/ NLGI grade 2 grease. The palm of hand method works fine. A bearing packer is even better.
16. Races; Some maintain they should always be replaced w/ the matching race to the bearing being installed. Some don’t. I won’t argue either point. I simply used the provided races. Satisfaction w/ current industry wide tolerances for new bearings is my reasoning. I generally only replace them if there is extreme mileage or evident damage/wear to them. If you are at all in disagreement w/ this or uncertain about using an unmatched bearing and race, feel free to knock them out and replace them w/ the matched set.
17. Filled middle of inner rotor bores w/ about “3 heaping fingers” of NLGI grade 2 grease rotating it around so that it covered all exposed metal. Dropped (2) inner bearings in (2) inner rotor races (ABS ring side).

(2) new front wheel oil seals – Timken # 4739

18. Tapped seals into seal recess and fully seated them inside the inner hub of the rotors (ABS ring side).

(2) new front outer wheel bearings - Timken Set 3

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19. Packed the bearings w/ NLGI grade 2 grease. The palm of hand method works fine. A bearing packer is even better. Placed back in plastic wrap and set aside.

(1) set Performance Friction Carbon Metallic brake pads # 0614-21

20. Brake pads covered later in the installation section.

(2) new caliper pin kits - Raybestos # H5058

21. Each kit has 2 caliper pins. Caliper pins covered later in the installation section.



B.) Installation:

1. Installed rotors on front spindles seating rotors over spindles and then installing outer bearings, washers, castle nuts and cotter pins in that order. The castle nuts were hand tightened and then torqued another ½ - ¾ turn until resistance was encountered when spinning the rotors by hand. This preloads the bearings. Now the castle nuts were backed off until a cotter pin could be placed through both the spindle hole and the castle nut “nook”. Spin rotors to check for looseness/over tightening. If too tight, loosen the castle nut so the next “nook” aligns w/ the spindle hole. Insert cotter pin and retest. If too loose, tighten the castle nut so the next “nook” aligns w/ the spindle hole. Insert cotter pin and retest. Once OK, bend one leg of the cotter pin back over the tip of the spindle until it points back to the head of the cotter pin and cut the base of the other leg off. Replace the dust cap retained earlier over the end of the hub.
2. Prepare the disk pads by coating the back of the pads w/ CRC disk brake quiet. Attach the 2 clips put aside earlier from the front hardware kit on the 2 inner pads.
3. Applied Ceramlub to the caliper guide channels where direct metal to metal contact w/ the pads occurs. Installed the pads on the calipers at this point.
4. Installed loaded calipers over the rotors and seated between upper and lower spindle support brackets.
5. Coated smooth surfaces of the new caliper pins w/ Ceramlub taking care NOT to get any on the threads. Threaded new caliper pins through spindle support brackets and into calipers. Tightened caliper pins.
6. Installed the left and right front braided stainless flex lines to the hard lines, again taking care not to twist the hard lines. Don’t tighten them yet. Threaded the banjo bolts retained earlier through the banjo fittings attached to the stainless flex lines and into the caliper brake line fittings. Be certain the 2 new crush washers are on either side of the banjo fitting (one seated between caliper and banjo fitting. One seated between banjo fitting and bolt head). Now tighten the banjo bolt to the caliper securely, but w/out over tightening. Finally, tightened the flex to hard line connections and secured them w/ the factory retaining clips.

III. Bleeding and Bedding –

A.) Bench Work, Prep and Parts Used:

(1) Quart Valvoline Synthetic Hi-Performance DOT 3 & 4 brake fluid

* Note 5 – Brake fluid is hygroscopic. It readily absorbs moisture. Humidity is moisture. Brake fluid readily absorbs humidity. Once you crack that seal, use it all if possible. Whatever is left over should be discarded. It doesn’t keep.

About 1 foot of 3/8” clear flexible vinyl tubing

B.) Bleeding:

1. Removed cap from master cylinder. Removed all debris and/or film from the master cylinder interior using a clean cotton fiber towel. Filled master cylinder w/ new brake fluid (see Note 5). Returned cap atop the master cylinder. A casual note here about how good a paint remover brake fluid is. Don’t drip it onto your fender or firewall area. If so, clean up immediately w/ soap and water.
2. At right rear caliper, removed protective debris cap and loosened bleeder screw. Warning - This is only possible w/ speedbleeders! Loosening a standard bleeder screw and leaving it loose while engaging and disengaging the brake pedal WILL result in air entering the system! If using standard bleed screws, a 2 man, gravity bleed or vinyl hose submersed into old brake fluid operation will be necessary. Attached the vinyl hose to the bleeder nipple. Placed other end of tube in an old bottle to avoid spills. Bled unit by depressing and disengaging brake pedal completely to the floor and back up repeatedly. Periodically checked master cylinder and refilled to insure it wouldn’t run dry. Periodically checked color of fluid entering the spill bottle and in vinyl tube until satisfied fresh fluid had worked itself all the way through the line. Once satisfied, removed vinyl tubing, tightened bleeder screw, replaced debris cap atop bleeder screw (if available) and topped off master cylinder.
3. Repeated procedure from step 2 on each remaining caliper in the following sequence: left rear, right front and left front.
4. Repeated entire procedure from steps 1 to 3 once more. For this step, only a couple of pedal engagements are necessary per caliper.
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5. Cleaned each caliper w/ soap and water to remove any chemical residue from the freshly painted calipers. Installed wheels and buttoned them up for the road. I use a 100 ft/lb Snap-On torque stick w/ a Mac impact gun to insure against over tightening the lug nuts.


C.) Bedding:

I’m no expert on this, so all I’ll provide is this:
http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/tech_white_papers.shtml
http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp_bedinstock.shtml
http://www.baer.com/technical/braking-202/padbedding.php

I followed the instructions as outlined from the 2nd link.


IV. Addendum –


A.) Centric Rotors –

The choice of Centric rotors was purely experimental. There really isn’t too much info out there about them. They get fairly good marks from members of various other car forums who’ve used them and from http://www.zeckhausenracing.com/. I have gotten one scathing review from the owner of the cryo shop I sent them to. So I just want to be up front about why these rotors were chosen (looking for a good alternative blank) and what the expectations of them are (hopefully good, but can’t know until tested). Factors which were considered when choosing the Centrics: recent migration of many traditionally North American foundries to overseas suppliers, double disk grinding and excellent non-directional finish, mill balancing to exacting tolerances instead of drilling out material from the “heavy” side, center split instead of side split core casting, e-coating on rotor edge and hat (note that other manufacturers are now adopting this as well). For those who instead want a proven commodity and are interested in cryo treatment, I’d recommend the Raybestos rotors from Frozen Rotors. This is what they currently use for their blanks and keep in stock.



B.) Cryogenic Treatment -

I’m a firm believer in the longevity cryogenic treatment can provide to brake rotors. I’ve used the process before on other platforms w/ favorable results. Any physical system is only as strong as its weakest link. The weak point in the Caprice braking system has been established by many to be the rotors. A daily driver and not using the vehicle for track use or AutoX, it’s difficult to substantiate the costs involved w/ a big brake upgrade kit. My choice to have the front rotors cryo’d was therefore intended to be a more cost effective way of bolstering the weakest link.

From what I gather, although this should by no means be definitive, all facilities offering this service for brake rotors use a computer controlled “set it and forget it” process using a top or front loading (usually top loading) cryogenic vat. Treatment prices vary. The time interval it takes dropping it to -300 degrees, the length of soak, the interval the process heat tempers the rotors afterwards and the final heat tempering temperature also vary. Direct inquiries to the various companies addressing these questions should be raised prior to final facility choice. In general, longer initial soak time and higher final tempering temperature is desirable. Shipping charges will play a role in choosing a facility. Listed here are various companies offering this service Nationwide and there are several others:

CA - NW Cryogenics - http://www.nwcryo.com/
CA – Rotors Online - http://www.rotorsonline.com/
NC - Performance Cryogenics - http://www.percryo.com/
GA - Professional Cryogenics - http://www.procryo.com/
MN – Diversified Cryogenics - http://www.frozenrotors.com/
OH – Cryoplus - http://www.cryoplus.com/

All facilities will accept drop shipments, but must be aware of the drop beforehand so arrangements can be made. Frozen Rotors is the only to specialize in brake rotors and have the longest track record in this arena. The advantage w/ Diversified Cryogenics is that they stock and cryo the rotors on site so you won’t have the additional shipping expenses and time delays associated w/ drop shipment. I have used their products before w/, to date, issue-free results. They are however, and to be frank, the most expensive. They maintain they use a proprietary process unlike other competitors, although I have no independent way of verifying the true advantages of this over other cryo processes. When considering the additional time and expense of shipping rotors out for cryo treatment, the Frozen Rotors are well established, reputable and become a more cost competitive option. The main reason I didn’t go w/ them for this project is that they use Raybestos blanks primarily for this platform, I wished to use Centric and they were charging too much additional to order the Centrics in. They offer a Power Slot Cryo rotor for those interested in slotted technology, but you should be aware their relationship w/ Power Slot was initiated prior to Centric’s acquisition of Power Slot in late 2007; http://www.autoblog.com/2007/10/31/centric-adds-power-slot-to-brake-family/. To that end, it’s interesting to note that the final 2 digits in the Power Slot Cryo rotor are now the same as the corresponding C-Tek (Centric’s economy blank), Centric Premium (Centric’s premium blank) and SportStop (Centric’s premium slotted and/or drilled offering) rotor part number:

Power Slot Cryo p/n – 8235PSx FR 8253PSx RR
Centric C-Tek p/n – 121.62035 FR 121.62053 RR
Centric Premium p/n – 120.62035 FR 120.62053 RR
Centric SportStop slotted p/n – 126.62035 FR 126.62053 RR
Centric SportStop drilled p/n – 127.62035 FR 127.62053 RR
Centric SportStop S&D p/n – 128.62035 FR 128.62053 RR

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C.) RPO JB9 & JA9 Front Disk Brake Observations

Caliper Pin: JB9 = 4 1/8” long, JA9 = 4 3/8” long
Caliper Piston: JB9 = 1.95" Overall Length 2.934" Piston Diameter
JA9 = 2.04" Overall Length 2.935" Piston Diameter
Master Cyl: HD & SEO 9C1/9C6/1A2 = 1 ¼” bore
All other Caprice/Impala SS = 1 1/8” bore
Brake Pads: JB9 = 11/32” Inner, 11/32” Outer
JA9 = 15/32” Inner, 11/32” Outer
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-09-2009, 09:40 AM Thread Starter
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Hopefully some of this can be useful since the recent SQL "purge". This job was completed in May 08. To date, no issues and great, firm brakes.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-27-2009, 12:53 AM
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Very well written! Thank you for all the detail in sharing your experience. My brakes are garbage right now, so I'm very happy to soak up some insight from your thorough post.

-Matt



96 9c1 LT1 - Home depot Intake / Home plate delete / TB By-pass / Performabuilt L1 / 2k converter.
91 9c1 LO5 - Broke the bell housing / Thrashed and Canned :-/
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 08-27-2009, 11:32 AM
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If this post is considered a thread hijack, let me know and i'll re-post. This thread seems like a good place to post some technical brake questions though. Anyway, I've changed my front pads, bent the tabs, applied anti-squeal goo to the back of the pads, and replaced the pins and bushings but when I apply the brakes and the car's is about to stop, I hear a loud, single click coming from the front brakes. It sounds like the pads are shifting but other than bending the tabs on the pads and putting anti-squeal goo on the pads, how can you stop the pads from moving? Also, this thread appears sticky worthy, just a suggestion

Ruphrax sourced 1996 RMW
Caddy tail lights
2.5" catback w/flowmaster 40's, X-pipe, & 911 tips
Ram Air hood/intake
Smooth front bumper
Rear roll pan
Rear wiper delete
Custom SS grill
UMI LCA's
Electric fan conversion
Hotchkis rear sway bar
Eagle 20's
Bonnies
Intrax springs
Bilsteins
160 thermostat
Soon to come: Reflash, 1.6 rockers, gears, custom console, bags, custom sub enclosure, HUD, 19" LCD monitor in tailgate, Trans Am steering box,
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3140885
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