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Joel...

Just curious if you have used any other undercoating products besides 3M, and how they compare.

I have only used the Rustoleum brand, and I love it, but I have also seen 3M, Krylon, and the Harbor Freight house brand all stocked near me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #182 ·
No idea. I just laid it on thick enough that it would absorb high velocity rocks. What do I look like? Project Farm?
 

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I used brush on Rustolem bed liner and it needs a recoat after a couple years.

-Brian
 

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I used brush on Rustolem bed liner and it needs a recoat after a couple years.

-Brian
I feel like bed liner is kind of an "old guy thing", in the sense that people did that back in the day before there were products actually labeled as undercoating.

I was not familiar with Project Farm, but I'm glad that has changed.
 

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feel like bed liner is kind of an "old guy thing", in the sense that people did that back in the day before there were products actually labeled as undercoating.
Sorry, couldnt leave this one alone,,,
Bedliner is the "new thing"
Undercoat has been around as long as cars have been.
8650636108_1a9685dbcf_b.jpg
 

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Sorry, couldnt leave this one alone,,,
Bedliner is the "new thing"
Undercoat has been around as long as cars have been.
View attachment 198898
I would be curious to see some sales data.

I didn't use enough nuance in my post (bad habit), but I wasn't necessarily saying that bed liner was invented first.

It seems like DIY, aerosol-based undercoating products that only cost a few dollars per can have become increasingly more popular and more common on store shelves. The convenience factor is important here.

If I were betting, I would predict that bed liner makes up a much smaller chunk of the undercoating market than it used to.

Also... Doesn't it seem like undercoating has become much less of a "professional" endeavor? 15 years ago, undercoating was a big business that shops advertised alI over the rust belt. Now, everyone just does it themselves with an aerosol can.

For the record, I like being corrected. I don't take it personally, so please don't hesitate. 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #189 ·
The problem with those undercoatings is that corrosion can get inside the frame and rot from the inside out. When I was in upstate NY I tried POR-15 on two cars and one rock chip ruins the whole thing. Then I switched to doing the "New England Undercoating" every fall. Jack up the vehicle, take the wheels off, cover the brakes, drain the engine oil, spray it all over the undercarriage, finish the oil change, then go for a drive on a dusty road. Towards the end of my time in upstate NY I used motorcycle chain lube with anti-corrosion additives in it.

Then I moved south and left all that behind. Our family minivan has 230,000 miles on it and is completely rust-free.
 

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Then I moved south and left all that behind. Our family minivan has 230,000 miles on it and is completely rust-free.
My Caprice has lived in Phoenix AZ all it's life and it shows, 266k and not a bit of rust!
 
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The problem with those undercoatings is that corrosion can get inside the frame and rot from the inside out. When I was in upstate NY I tried POR-15 on two cars and one rock chip ruins the whole thing. Then I switched to doing the "New England Undercoating" every fall. Jack up the vehicle, take the wheels off, cover the brakes, drain the engine oil, spray it all over the undercarriage, finish the oil change, then go for a drive on a dusty road. Towards the end of my time in upstate NY I used motorcycle chain lube with anti-corrosion additives in it.
As effective as that may be, I just can't get behind the idea of using oil and dirt.

I scrubbed my floorpan clean before undercoating, and it had been covered with oil at some point. That oil is the only reason the floor looks okay after sitting outdoors for a decade. So, I get it. It works great.

There are obviously products made for the inside of the frame. And, I mean, if you're doing a frame-off... you have a bunch of options.

sherlock9c1 said:
Then I moved south and left all that behind. Our family minivan has 230,000 miles on it and is completely rust-free.
My Caprice has lived in Phoenix AZ all it's life and it shows, 266k and not a bit of rust!
Guys... That's nothing.

My Audi has now been driven through 23 straight Chicago winters, and has 245k miles. The underside is spotless. The entire floorpan is coated in thick rubber, and most of the bolts don't even have rust. They are built to withstand winter conditions.

We're getting scammed by the American companies. You buy a brand new truck, and after 8 years you already have rust issues and ticking exhaust manifolds.
 
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Discussion Starter · #192 ·
OK, before Caddylack fully commandeers this thread... let's get back to work.
On the ignition coil stud are a bunch of PCM grounds. Those wires tend to fatigue and break, giving really weird drivability problems. Shortly after I reinstalled the motor, I replaced all of the ground connectors with new ones. You should seriously consider doing the same on your car.
198949
 
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Discussion Starter · #193 ·
I also installed the "brake bolt mod" which removes the shuttle valve necessary with drum brakes and changes the proportioning to increase rear brake usage. I did this on my 9C1 and the stopping greatly improved, but I will say that my experience was that rear brake pads wore faster than fronts afterwards. And I completely gave up on doing burnouts without a line lock.

These valves go into the proportioning valve which is directly below the master cylinder. Before installing, I pushed in the brake pedal about 1/2" to block the bleed ports. I lost very little fluid during the swap.

I got this from Rock Auto, the vendor is Pro-Forged. The founders of Pro-Forged were B-body enthusiasts. I believe the company is now owned by Holley.
198950

198951

The modified one is on the left. The stock valving is on the right.
 

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OK, before Caddylack fully commandeers this thread... let's get back to work.
On the ignition coil stud are a bunch of PCM grounds. Those wires tend to fatigue and break, giving really weird drivability problems. Shortly after I reinstalled the motor, I replaced all of the ground connectors with new ones. You should seriously consider doing the same on your car.
View attachment 198949
Have you put any thought into combining the wires into one connector? Or, maybe even into one wire.

I brought this up on the forum once before, but I don't remember who I discussed it with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #195 ·
Have you put any thought into combining the wires into one connector? Or, maybe even into one wire.
Of course. The challenge is finding a connector large enough to handle all four (which I didn't have on hand) and then you'd have to make sure that all four wires were fully captured and crimped into one large crimp.
 

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Best thread on the forum in a decade.
Seriously awesome. Just binged the whole thing.
Makes me want to buy my SS back from my brother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #198 ·
Time for some love to the EVAP system. I don't know what specification GM used for the original rubber hoses on this but time and gas vapors have not been kind to them. This is located under the battery on a Roadmaster/Impala/Caprice/Fleetwood. You can remove the plastic RF lower splashguard to get to it.
198981


Let's take it apart and measure all the right hoses we need.
MVIMG_20190706_091955.jpg


While I'm not sure the old canister was compromised or worn out, I'd rather just install a new one and be done with it.
IMG_20200223_130046.jpg


I used new fuel-line hose; it's tough to find low-pressure hose which would have been thinner wall and a lot more flexible, but fortunately the bends were gentle enough that the thicker high pressure stuff will work without putting too much stress on the plastic fittings. Bracket cleaned and painted. I may have clearcoated this one. Just because.
198984


Installed on the frame rail.
IMG_20200223_135256.jpg


Here's a top-down view with the inner fender removed. This system is now fully restored and ready to go. Just need to fix the leak in the vent line back near the tank and the fuel system will be fully sealed up, working as new.
198987
 
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Discussion Starter · #200 ·
EVAP and PCV are the two most significant (and easiest) emissions reduction devices you can have on your car. I maybe had two hours work into replacing all this stuff. I'd keep it. It doesn't add much weight at all.
 
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